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  1. Section Bylaws

    BY-LAWS: SECTION ON RACE, GENDER AND CLASS

    Approved 1996, Revised 2010

  2. Conferences & Calls for Papers

    Race, Gender, and Class Section

    This page lists announcements, upcoming conferences, and calls for papers relevant to Race, Class and Gender. Please send other conference announcements and calls for papers to the webmaster for posting.

  3. Landa Abstract

    “It’s Just Completely Different For Them:” Gender Differences In Black Experiences Of An Urban-To-Suburban School Integration Program

  4. Past Awards

    Race, Gender, and Class Section

    Past Awards

    Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award

    This award recognizes scholars who have made a distinguished and significant contribution to the development of the integrative field of race, gender, and class through the publication of a book on the "cutting edge" of sociological inquiry. Links are to the publisher's book page.

  5. Study Uses 311 Complaints to Track Where and When Neighborhood Conflict Emerges

    Each year, 311 — New York City's main hub for government information and non-emergency services — receives millions of requests and complaints, including New Yorkers' gripes about their neighbors.

  6. Actresses Must Be Picky About With Whom They Work to Survive in Movie Industry

    Actresses need to be pickier than men about with whom they work if they want to survive in the movie industry, suggests a new study.

    "My research indicates that women in the film industry suffer a lack of access to future career opportunities when they tend to work with people who have collaborated frequently in the past," said Mark Lutter, lead author of the study and head of the "Transnational Diffusion of Innovation" Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies (MPIfG) in Germany.

  7. For Most Adolescents, Popularity Increases the Risk of Getting Bullied

    A new study suggests that for most adolescents, becoming more popular both increases their risk of getting bullied and worsens the negative consequences of being victimized.

    “Most people probably would not think that having a higher social status would increase the risk of being targeted, but with few exceptions, that’s what we find,” said the study’s lead author Robert Faris, an associate professor of sociology at the University of California-Davis. “It’s kind of a hidden pattern of victimization that is rooted in the competition for social status.”