American Sociological Association

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  1. Featured Member Benefit: Teaching and Learning Resources

    Faculty are at the heart of the discipline of sociology. ASA offers resources and programs to support pedagogical and career success for faculty and teachers at all stages of their careers and at all types of institutions. Member benefits include:

  2. 2018 ASA Award Recipients

    The ASA awards are conferred on sociologists for outstanding scholarship, teaching, practice, and advancing the public understanding of sociology. The ASA proudly announces the recipients of the awards for 2018. Congratulations to the following honorees:

    Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award

    Joe R. Feagin, Texas A&M University

  3. 2017 ASA Award Recipients

    Cox-Johnson-Frazier Award

    Mary Romero, Arizona State University

  4. The Condensed Courtship Clock: How Elite Women Manage Self-development and Marriage Ideals

    As elite, heterosexual women delay marriage, complete higher education, and pursue high-status careers, are they able to de-center the other-oriented roles of wife and mother in their lives? Using in-depth interviews with 33 single, college-educated women, the authors examine how elite women balance expectations for self-development and family formation. Participants constructed a timeline with three phases: the self-development phase, the readiness moment, and the push to partner. Women’s initial focus on self-development ends with a shift toward feeling ready to search for a spouse.
  5. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.
  6. Cancer, Body, and Mastery at the Intersection of Gender and Race

    Using the 2006-2014 data from the Health and Retirement Study, the author compares changes in personal mastery after a new cancer diagnosis among white men, white women, black men, and black women.
  7. Race, Emotional Reliance, and Mental Health

    Prior research shows that emotional reliance, an indicator of interpersonal dependence, is an important psychosocial risk factor for mental health problems. However, few have considered black-white differences in emotional reliance or the role it may play in racial variations in mental health outcomes. Using a community epidemiologic sample of adults in Nashville, Tennessee, the current study builds on the small literature on emotional reliance by exploring three aims. First, we evaluate racial differences in emotional reliance.
  8. Social Relations and Health: Comparing “Invisible” Arab Americans to Blacks and Whites

    This paper establishes preliminary benchmarks by comparing average values of social relations and health among Arab Americans, blacks, and whites. Specifically, we expand traditional racial/ethnic categories to distinguish Arab Americans, historically and legally considered white. Data come from a unique random-digit-dial (RDD) sample of Arab Americans (N = 96), blacks (N = 102), and whites (N = 100) from metro-Detroit collected in 2011, ranging in age from 19 to 89. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to compare health, network structure, composition, and support quality.