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  1. Sociologists Available to Discuss Holiday-Related Topics Ranging From Shopping to Sadness

    As the holiday season begins, the American Sociological Association (ASA) has sociologists available to discuss holiday-related topics ranging from shopping to sadness.

  2. Journal of Health and Social Behavior to Publish Corrected Version of Study

    The authors of a March 2015 Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB) study, "In Sickness and in Health? Physical Illness as a Risk Factor for Marital Dissolution in Later Life" (2015, 56(1):59-73), have retracted the article. There was a major error in the coding in their dependent variable of marital status. The conclusions of that study should be considered invalid. A corrected version of the article will appear in the September 2015 issue of JHSB.

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  3. Job Authority Increases Depression Symptoms in Women, Decreases Them in Men

    A new study finds that having job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men.

    "Women with job authority — the ability to hire, fire, and influence pay — have significantly more symptoms of depression than women without this power," said Tetyana Pudrovska, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin and the lead author of the study. "In contrast, men with job authority have fewer symptoms of depression than men without such power."

  4. Accepting a Job Below One's Skill Level Can Adversely Affect Future Employment Prospects

    Accepting a job below one's skill level can be severely penalizing when applying for future employment because of the perception that someone who does this is less committed or less competent, according to new research from a sociologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

  5. Local Homicide Rate Increases Cause More Elementary Students to Fail School

    A new study finds that an increase in a municipality’s homicide rate causes more elementary school students in that community to fail a grade than would do so if the rate remained stable.

  6. People More Likely to Cheat as They Become More Economically Dependent on Their Spouses

    Both men and women are more likely to cheat on their spouses the more economically dependent they are on them, according to a new study.

    "You would think that people would not want to 'bite the hand that feeds them' so to speak, but that is not what my research shows," said study author Christin L. Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut. "Instead, the findings indicate people like feeling relatively equal in their relationships. People don't like to feel dependent on another person."

  7. Sociologists Available to Discuss Mass Shootings and Gun Culture

    In the wake of yesterday's tragic event in San Bernardino, California, the American Sociological Association (ASA) has sociologists available to discuss mass shootings and gun culture.

  8. For Men in Pink-Collar Jobs, a Tradeoff: Lower Pay, More Job Security

    Is a man without a four-year college degree better off trying to land a well-paying but insecure job in traditionally male fields such as manufacturing or construction, or should he consider lower-paying but steadier employment in a female-dominated field?

    Janette Dill, a University of Akron sociology professor, and her colleagues try to answer that question in a new study she will present at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

  9. Study Reveals Why Men Receive Much More Media Coverage Than Women

    For years social scientists have grappled with the question of why men receive far more media coverage than women, and now a new study reveals the answer.

  10. Men Viewed More Favorably Than Women When Seeking Work-Life Balance

    While some suggest that flexible work arrangements have the potential to reduce workplace inequality, a new study finds these arrangements may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status and gender.

    Study author Christin Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at Furman University, analyzed the reactions both men and women received when making flexible work requests — meaning that they either asked to work from home or to work non-traditional hours.