American Sociological Association



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  1. More Than Half of 'Children' Misperceive or Reject Parents' Political Party Affiliations

    A new study finds that more than half of all "children" in the U.S. either misperceive or reject their parents' political party affiliations.

  2. Children of Undocumented Mexican Immigrants Have Heightened Risk of Behavior Problems

    Children of undocumented Mexican immigrants have a significantly higher risk of behavior problems than their co-ethnic counterparts with documented or naturalized citizen mothers, according to a new study.

    The difficulties come in two forms: sadness or social withdrawal — what the authors refer to as internalizing behavior problems — and issues such as aggressiveness towards others — which the authors call externalizing behavior problems.   

  3. Study Suggests Earning a College Degree Before, But Not After, Getting Married Protects Against Obesity

    People who earn a college degree before getting married are much less likely to become obese than those who graduate from college after getting married, according to a new study.

  4. Unlike Less Educated People, College Grads More Active on Weekends Than Weekdays

    People’s educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers.

    The study finds that, on average, those with a college degree are more active on Saturdays and Sundays than on a typical weekday — whereas for people without a high school degree, the opposite is true.

  5. Consumers Increasingly Face Companies’ Creative Smoke and Mirrors, Study Finds

    Heavily marketed as a safer, healthful alternative to smoking, electronic cigarettes are under fire from California health officials who have declared "vaping" a public health threat, hoping to head off the type of deceptive manipulation that tobacco companies succeeded with for decades, according to researchers. 

  6. ASA Opposes Subpoena of ‘Belfast Project’ Data

    The Council of the American Sociological Association (ASA) is profoundly disturbed by the possibility that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit will uphold Judge William G. Young’s recent ruling that personally identifiable research data collected as part of Boston College’s “Belfast Project” must be turned over to British law enforcement through the U.S. Department of Justice.

  7. Couples That Split Childcare Duties Have Higher Quality Relationships and Sex Lives

    Heterosexual couples that split childcare duties have higher quality relationships and sex lives than those who don't, according to new research that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA). 

  8. CUNY Professor Elected President of the American Sociological Association

    Ruth Milkman, a professor of sociology at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center and research director at CUNY’s Joseph F. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies, has been elected president of the American Sociological Association (ASA). Barbara J. Risman, a professor and head of the Department of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, has been elected vice president.

  9. Daughters Provide as Much Elderly Parent Care as They Can, Sons Do as Little as Possible

    Parents are better off having daughters if they want to be cared for in their old age suggests a new study, which finds that women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible.

  10. Daughters of Interracial Parents More Likely Than Sons to Identify as Multiracial

    Daughters of interracial parents are more likely than sons to identify as multiracial, and this is especially true for children of black-white couples, according to a new study in the February issue of the American Sociological Review.