American Sociological Association

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  1. The Best Time to Have a Baby: Institutional Resources and Family Strategies Among Early Career Sociologists

    Using data from ASA's 1998 Survey of Recent PhD Graduates in Sociology, this research brief examines the availability and use of resources and strategies during graduate school and their impact on the early career success of a cohort of PhD sociologists, asking the question "When is the best time to have a baby for women sociologists?"

  2. Gender in the Early Stages of the Sociological Career

    This research brief uses data from ASA's 1998 Survey of Recent PhD Graduates in Sociology to examine how the increase in women sociology doctorate holders over men has influenced early career outcomes among women and men who recently received their degrees.

  3. Mothers in Pursuit of Ideal Academic Careers

    Using data from ASA's PhD+10 survey, this research brief studies whether gender and parental status affected likelihood of obtaining an "ideal" versus "alternative career" during the first 10 years post-PhD.

  4. PhDs at Mid-Career: Satisfaction with Work and Family

    This research brief focuses on work and family activities that affect satisfaction with careers and families for a cohort of mid-career sociologists who are mothers
    and fathers or childless.

  5. Resources or Rewards? The Distribution of Work-Family Policies

    Using data from ASA's 2004 PhD+6 Follow-Up Survey, this research brief examines the distribution and use of work-family policies and other scholarly resources among academics in sociology.

  6. The Faculty Pipeline in Sociology and Other STEM Disciplines

    This presentation summarizes available data on the progression of women, and particularly women of color, in sociology and other disciplines through college degrees and faculty ranks. Obtaining data with sufficient detail is difficult, but there is ample evidence that women are underrepresented at senior faculty ranks across disciplines.

  7. ASA Sections: Membership by Gender

    ASA Sections: Membership by Gender, 2001-2015

     

    2001

    2008

    2015

     

  8. ASA Membership by Gender

    Notes: Percentages calculated on members providing data. Some caution should be used in interpreting these figures, since a substantial proportion of members do not complete the demographic items. Data for 2000 not available. Beginning in 2014 members could specify non-binary gender identities, which were selected by 0.2 percent in 2014, 0.4 percent in 2015, and 1.2 percent in 2016.

  9. ASA Regular Members by Gender

    Notes: Percentages calculated on members providing data. Some caution should be used in interpreting these figures, since a substantial proportion of members do not complete the demographic items. Data for 2000 not available. Beginning in 2014 members could specify non-binary gender identities, which were selected by 0.1 percent in 2014, 0.2 percent in 2015, and 0.8 percent in 2016.

  10. ASA Student Members by Gender

    Notes: Percentages calculated on members providing data. Some caution should be used in interpreting these figures, since a substantial proportion of members do not complete the demographic items. Data for 2000 not available. Beginning in 2014 members could specify non-binary gender identities, which were selected by 0.3 percent in 2014, 0.8 percent in 2015, and 2.2 percent in 2016.