American Sociological Association

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  1. Pathways to Job Satisfaction: What Happened to the Class of 2005?

    This is the second in a series of research briefs to focus on the job outcomes of the 2005 sociology cohort. This brief describes a pathway from the sociological research skills learned as an undergraduate to the types of jobs obtained one and a half years after graduation and the effect on job satisfaction. 

  2. What are they Doing with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology? Data Brief on Current Jobs

    This brief uses data gathered from the second wave of the survey of 2005 sociology majors. It provides an overview of the post-graduate activities of graduates including the kinds of jobs they held, their satisfaction with these jobs, and the changes in their overall satisfaction with the sociology major. 

  3. Jobs, Careers & Sociological Skills: The Early Employment Experiences of 2012 Sociology Majors

    This research brief details the variety of jobs obtained by the 2012 cohort of sociology graduates, along with the types of sociological skills they have found useful and their job satisfaction. 

  4. Pathways to Job Satisfaction: What Happened to the Class of 2005?

    This is the second in a series of research briefs to focus on the job outcomes of the 2005 sociology cohort. This brief describes a pathway from the sociological research skills learned as an undergraduate to the types of jobs obtained one and a half years after graduation and the effect on job satisfaction. 

  5. Individual Salary is Not Enough

    Individual Salary is Not Enough: Measuring the Well-Being of Recent College Graduates in Sociology examines the outcomes of a baccalaureate degree in sociology. The authors find that income, the most widely-used degree outcome measure, is inadequate as a sole predictor of college outcomes, including job satisfaction, holding a professional job, experiencing on-the-job advancement, and participating in civic life. Learning sociological skills and methods appears to be more important. (Corrected version October 2016)