American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 168 results in 0.028 seconds.

Search results

  1. American Sociological Association Names Nancy Weinberg Kidd New Executive Officer

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) announced today that Nancy Weinberg Kidd will succeed the retiring Sally T. Hillsman as the Association's executive officer in September.

    Kidd, who earned a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University and a B.A. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, is currently the executive director of the National Communication Association (NCA) in Washington, D.C.

  2. American Sociological Association Launches New Open Access Journal, Socius

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) has launched Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, a new open access journal, which published its inaugural articles earlier this month.

    A first of its kind for the ASA, the journal is free to anyone, appears online only, and can feature scholarly papers on any sociology-related topic.

  3. ASA Is Seattle Bound!

    If you simply attempt to enjoy Seattle by staying in or around the Sheraton Hotel and the Washington State Convention Center you will miss a key feature of Seattle: its neighborhoods. The topography of Seattle lends itself to the creation of unique spaces defined by a variety of hills, valleys, and waterfronts. The long-standing patterns of ethnic and racial segregation, migrations, and new economic dynamics uniquely define a variety of historically distinct, well-established, and also emerging features of the social and built landscape of the city.

  4. The Concerns of Student Protesters and What Sociology Has to Offer

    Causes of Protests and Student Demands

    At the root of some student complaints are worries over representation, campus climate, and a nagging sense of the failure of diversity policies to address issues of structural inequality. A large body of sociological research on diversity and affirmative action in higher education lends credence to student complaints about a lack of representation. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, faculty of color remain underrepresented.

  5. Political Parties or Sociology Parties?

    Mike Leavitt, the former governor of Utah, recently stated that “[t]here is more sociology happening now than there is politics [in the current election]…the politics are really overshadowed by the sociology...[But] we don’t have sociology parties, we have political parties.”1 Although I am not extensively versed in political science and cannot speak to whether sociology trumps politics in this election, there certainly is a good deal of sociology surrounding Trump in politics.