Printer Friendly Version Of American Sociological Association: Involuntarily Out-of-Field Rates for Doctorate Social and Behavioral Scientists, 1993 - 2003
http://www.asanet.org/research/stats/employment_trend_data/involuntarily9303.cfm

Involuntarily Out-of-Field Rates for Doctorate Social and Behavioral Scientists


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Graph of Involuntarily Out-of-Field Rates for Doctoral Social and Behavioral Scientists, 1993 - 2003 in percents


Note: Labor force is defined as those employed plus those unemployed and seeking work.  Involuntarily out-of-field rate is the percent of individuals who reported they were working part-time exclusively because suitable full-time work was not available and/or working in an area not related to the first doctoral degree (in their principal job) at least partially because suitable work in the field was not available.

Summary:

In 2003, about one out of 20 sociologists reported that they are employed out-of-field because they could not find what they considered to be a suitable job for a sociologist. While the ten-year trend for sociologists is more volatile compared to other disciplines, the out-of-field rate has shown only modest growth since 1999, a trend which generally parallels rates for PhDs from other disciplines.
Related charts:

Source:

ASA computations based on data from National Science Foundation, Science Resource Statistics, Characteristics of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in the United States (Arlington, VA: NSF, 1996 - 2006). Retrieved from http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/pubseri.cfm?seri_id=13 (November 31, 2006).