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2010 Annual Meeting
Didactic Seminars

For additional program information contact:

Academic and Professional Affairs
Email: APAP@asanet.org
Phone: 202-383-9005 xt 318

 105th Annual Meeting Banner

Didactic Seminars are designed to keep sociologists abreast of recent scholarly trends and developments. Experts considered to be at the forefront of a given field are invited by the Program Committee to conduct these intensive sessions. Seminar fees are non-refundable after July 14.  However, if the required enrollment was not reached by the time of preregistration closed and the seminar was cancelled, all fees will be fully refunded.  Reservations for seminars are accepted in order of receipt.  Those who did not preregister may check for possible openings at the ASA On-Site Registration.

 

2010 Didactic Seminar Roster

Seminar 01. Didactic Seminar. Quantitative Narrative Analysis and PC-ACE

Sat, Aug 14 - 9:00am - 12:00pm

Atlanta Marriott Marquis

Fee: $35

       

Leader: Roberto P. Franzosi,  Emory University

 

Seminar Description: Not available at this time.

*You must also register for the Annual Meeting to attend this course.

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Registration Closes July 14

Seminar 02. Small-N Compass: Systematic Cross-Case Analysis

Sat, Aug 14 - 2:30pm - 4:10pm

 Atlanta Marriott Marquis

Fee: $35

 

Leader: Charles C. Ragin, University of Arizona

 

 

 

Seminar Description: The analytic challenge of case-oriented research is not simply that the number of cases is small, but that researchers gain useful in-depth knowledge of cases that is difficult to represent using conventional forms (e.g., representations that emphasize the “net effects” of “independent variables”). The researcher is left wondering how to represent knowledge of cases in a way that is meaningful and compact, but which also does not deny case complexity. Set-theoretic methods such as Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), the central focus of this seminar, offer a solution. QCA is fundamentally a case-oriented method that can be applied to small-to-moderate size Ns. It is most useful when researchers have knowledge of each case included in an investigation, there is a relatively small number of such cases (e.g., 10-50), and the investigator seeks to compare cases as configurations. With these methods it is possible to construct representations of cross-case patterns that allow for substantial heterogeneity and diversity.

This seminar offers an advanced introduction to the approach and to the use of the software package fsQCA. Both the crisp (i.e., Boolean) and fuzzy-set versions of the method will be presented.Fuzzy set analysis is gaining popularity in the social sciences today because of the close connections it enables between verbal theory, substantive knowledge (especially in the assessment of set membership), and data analysis. Fuzzy sets are especially useful in case-oriented research, where the investigator has a degree of familiarity with the cases included in the investigation and seeks to understand cases configurationally--as specific combinations of aspects or elements. Using fuzzy-set methods, case outcomes can be examined in ways that allow for causal complexity, where different combinations of causally relevant conditions combine to generate the outcome in question. Also, with fuzzy-set methods it is a possible to evaluate arguments that causal conditions are necessary or sufficient. Examinations of this type are outside the scope of conventional analytical methods.

*You must also register for the Annual Meeting to attend this course.

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Registration Closes July 14

 

Seminar 03. Neurosociology and the Social Nature of the Brain

Mon, Aug 16 - 10:30am - 12:10pm

Atlanta Marriott Marquis

Fee: $35

 

Leaders: David D. Franks, Virginia Commonwealth University; Jeff Davis, California State University-Long Beach

 

 

Seminar Description: Since the last half of the 1990s, which Congress officially labeled “the Decade of the Brain”, the ASA and its officers have supported special and regular sessions in neuroscience at our annual meetings. From the beginning, these sessions have been very well attended. In 1999 Dr. Franks and Thomas Smith edited the first collection of essays by sociologists dealing with neurosociological issues titled Mind, Brain and Society: Toward a Neurosociology of Emotion.  One reviewer of this volume said that all sociologists should read it, but that he feared very few would because of the wall between biology and sociology. In a relatively short time, it has become evident that this bias has significantly dissipated, and more and more articles and chapters dealing with neuroscience are being accepted in sociological journals and books. Much of this acceptance has been because of the support for neuroscience by our leading theorists who have been invited to start off the seminar.  This seminar should aid in demonstrating the relevance of the brain to our social natures and to maintaining sociology’s growing interest and necessary progress in this area.

*You must also register for the Annual Meeting to attend this course.

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Registration Closes July 14

 


Seminar 04. Emergent Technologies for Qualitative Research

Mon, Aug 16 - 2:30pm - 5:30pm

Atlanta Marriott Marquis

Fee: $35

 

Leader: Sharlene J. Hesse-Biber, Boston College

 

 

Seminar Description: Emergent technologies have pushed against the boundaries of qualitative research practice. This didactic seminar will explore issues regarding how qualitative researchers can effectively apply new technological innovations, including the use of the internet, mobile phone technologies, geospatial technologies, and the incorporation of computer-assisted software programs, to collect and analyze both qualitative and mixed-methods dataThis seminar will:
(l) Provide an overview of some of the newest mobile technologies (using GPS) in the service of gathering qualitative data:    The mobile phone allows the researcher to capture personal experience in real time and space.  The collection of user experience data has enormous implications for the study of human interaction. The researcher is able to study experience in context over an extended period of time   using fewer resources and in a less obtrusive manner. We provide in-depth examples how this technology might be applied to a qualitative research project. We will also discuss some of the ethical, issues emergent technologies raise for social researchers.
(2) Computer Assisted Software for Multi-media Analysis:  We demonstrate  the latest data gathering and analysis software for analyzing multi-mediated data qualitative data —web-based data,  audio, video and images using the computer-assisted data analysis package, HyperResearch (www.researchware.com)
(3). Transcription Software for Qualitative Data Analysis: We will also demonstrate cutting edge transcription software and discuss how the importance of transcription and its role in analyzing your qualitative data. We will demonstrate the transcription software, HyperTranscribe  (www.researchware.com).
Please note: This is not a hands-on seminar, but we will be demonstrating the software and provide you with a set of handouts. The seminar will last for 3 hours.

*You must also register for the Annual Meeting to attend this course.

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Registration Closes July 14