American Sociological Association

ASA Footnotes

A publication of the American Sociological AssociationASA News & Events
July/August 2016
Volume 
44
Issue 
5

Sociologists Elected to the National Academy of Sciences

In May, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) announced the election of two sociologists—Andrew Cherlin and Eileen Crimmins—among this year’s 84 new members. These newly elected NAS members were recognized for their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Members in the Academy, considered one of the highest honors in American science, help write reports on key scientific issues to help inform policymakers’ decisions.

The 2016 NAS election was held during the annual meeting of the Academy. NAS is a private organization of scientists and engineers dedicated to the furtherance of science and its use for the general welfare. The Academy acts as an official adviser to the federal government, upon request, in any matter of science or technology. For more information, see www.nasonline.org.

Andrew Cherlin is the Griswold Professor of Public Policy and Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. His research focus is on the sociology of families and public policy. Cherlin has published books and articles on topics such as marriage and divorce, children’s well-being, intergenerational relations, family policy, and welfare policy. His most recent book is Labor’s Love Lost: The Rise and Fall of the Working-Class Family in America. Also this spring, he was among 213 new members elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Eileen M Crimmins is the AARP Professor of Gerontology in the Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. She is currently the director of the USC/UCLA Center on Biodemography and Population Health, a Demography of Aging Center supported by the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIA). She is also the Director of the Multidisciplinary Training in Gerontology Program and the NIA-sponsored Network on Biological Risk. Much of her research has focused on changes over time in health and mortality.