November 2010 Issue • Volume 38 • Issue 8

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Announcements

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Call for Papers

Publications

Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice Special Issue: "Special Education, Human Rights, and Social Justice in East Asia." Papers are invited on education for human rights and social justice from a range of local and national contexts across East Asia. All contributions should be emailed to Audrey Osler at A.H.Osler@leeds.ac.uk and Yan Wing Leung at ywleung@ied.edu.hk. Deadline: November 30, 2010. Label your e-mail: ECSJ Education, human rights and social justice special issue submission. For more information, visit lists.hrea.org/phplist/lt.php?id=Kh5QBgdeCgJbAxgGCwEFUU4GBFY
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Journal of Women’s History Special Issue: "Human Rights, Global Congresses, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms." Authors are invited to submit articles that address the historical dimensions of the intersection between human rights and transnational feminist organizing. Authors should place their analysis in its specific historical and social contexts. We encourage submissions from academics, activists, and meeting attendees. Deadline: May 15, 2011. Submit papers to both Jean Quataert at profquat@binghamton.edu and Benita Roth at broth@binghamton.edu.

Solving Social Problems provides a forum for the description and measurement of social problems, with a keen focus on the concrete remedies proposed for their solution. The series takes an international perspective. In addition to recommending solutions to social problems, the books in this series are theoretically sophisticated, exploring previous discussions of the issues in question, examining other attempts to resolve them, and adopting and discussing methodologies that are commonly used to measure social problems. Proposed solutions may be framed as changes in policy or practice, or more broadly as social change and social movement. Solutions may be reflective of ideology, but are always pragmatic and detailed, explaining the means by which the suggested solutions might be achieved. Contact: Bonnie Berry at solving@socialproblems.org or Neil Jordan at njordan@ashgatepublishing.com.

Meetings

First Global Conference on Transparency Research, May 19-20, 2011, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ. This meeting will bring together leading scholars from throughout the world to collectively advance our understanding of the impact and implications of transparency policies that involve governments. In addition to individual paper proposals, the program committee encourages the submission of panels consisting of no more than four papers. Proposals from individuals at all stages of their career, particularly graduate students, are welcome. Deadline: November 30, 2010. Contact: Jyldyz Kasymova at transparency.conference@gmail.com or Suzanne Piotrowski at spiotrow@newark.rutgers.edu. For more information, visit spaa.newark.rutgers.edu/home/conferences/
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Meetings

November 24-27, 2010. The Athens Dialogues, Onassis Cultural Centre-Athens. Sixty eminent academics from the partner organizations and other leading institutions will come together for discussions ranging widely across disciplines and historic periods. Contact: klawanss@ruderfinn.com. For more information, visit www.athensdialogues.org.

December 6-9, 2010. TASA Conference 2010, Macquarie University. Theme: "Social Causes, Private Lives." The 2010 TASA conference is dedicated to the reassertion of sociology as an engaged, critical discipline. For more information, visit www.soc.mq.edu.au/tasa-conference.

January 6-8, 2011. Arizona Methods Workshops, Tucson, AZ. Workshop 1: Qualitative Comparative Analysis and Fuzzy Sets. Workshop 2: Introducing Structural Equation Modeling. Workshop 3: Introducing Social Network Analysis Methods. Workshop 4: Categorical Data Analysis. Contact: Erin Leahey: (520) 621-9351; methods@arizona.edu.

March 24-27, 2011. Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) Annual Meeting, St Louis, MO, Theme: "The Dynamics of Inequality." Contact: Mary Zimmerman and Pooya Naderi at mss2011@ku.edu; www.theMSS.org.

April 6-8, 2011. The British Sociological Association Annual Conference, London School of Economics. Theme: "60 Years of Sociology." Contact: BSAConference@britsoc.org.uk; www.britsoc.co.uk/.

May 19-20, 2011. First Global Conference on Transparency Research, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ. This is the first large meeting of its kind to bring together leading scholars from throughout the world to collectively advance our understanding of the impact and implications of transparency policies that involve governments, either directly or indirectly. Contact: Jyldyz Kasymova at transparency.conference@gmail.com or Suzanne Piotrowski at spiotrow@newark.rutgers.edu. For more information, visit spaa.newark.rutgers.edu/home/conferences/1stgctr.html.

May 24-26, 2011. Global Awareness Society International’s 20th International Interdisciplinary Conference, Sheraton Old San Juan Hotel, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Theme: "The Global Future: Caribbean and Beyond." The central focus of the conference will address how globalization impacts various peoples and geographic regions of the world. Contact: George Agbango at gagbango@bloomu.edu or Jay Nathan at nathanj@stjohns.edu. For more information, visit orgs.bloomu.edu/gasi.

June 16-18, 2011. Human Rights, War, and Peace After the Cold War, Seoul, Korea. This three-day conference intends to bring together human rights scholars and practitioners to discuss human rights issues as related to peace and war in the post-Cold War era. Contact: Sukhee Han at shan65@yonsei.ac.kr; Anja Mihr at A.Mihr@uu.nl; or Füsun Türkmen at fturkmen@gsu.edu.tr.

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Funding

Effects of the Social Environment on Health: Measurement, Methods and Mechanisms. This FOA, issued as part of the NIH Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet), solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to investigate structural, behavioral, sociocultural, environmental, cognitive, emotional, and/or biological mechanisms through which the social environment affects health outcomes. The NIH will commit approximately $5 million to this funding initiative in 2011, allowing the support of 8 or 9 new R01 applications, for a total of approximately $24 million over the next five years. Deadline: January 6, 2011. For more information, visit grants.nih.gov/grants/funding/424/index.htm.

Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program. This Graduate Fellowship Program of the National Academies is designed to engage its fellows in the analytical process that informs U.S. science and technology policy. Fellows develop basic skills essential to working or participating in science policy at the federal, state, or local levels. Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars and those who have completed graduate studies or postdoctoral research in any social/behavioral science or any relevant interdisciplinary field within the last five years are eligible to apply. The program takes place in Washington, DC. Deadline: May 1, 2011. Contact: policyfellows@nas.edu; www.national-academies.org/policyfellows.

National Science Foundation Social-Computational Systems (SoCS) program seeks to reveal new understanding about the properties that systems of people and computers together possess and to develop theoretical and practical understandings of the purposeful design of systems to facilitate socially intelligent computing. The SoCS program will support research in socially intelligent computing arising from human-computer partnerships that range in scale from a single person and computer to an Internet-scale array of machines and people. Proposals that reflect collaborative efforts spanning computational and human centered approaches and perspectives are encouraged.
Deadline: November 23, 2010. For more information, visit www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10600/nsf10600.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click.

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Competitions

2011 Alan T. Waterman Award. The National Science Foundation (NSF)requests nominations for the 2011 Alan T. Waterman Award. The award recognizes the talent, creativity, and influence of a singular young researcher. Nominees are accepted from any field of science or engineering that NSF supports. Candidates should have demonstrated exceptional individual achievements in scientific or engineering research. Criteria include originality, innovation, and significant impact on the field. Contact: Mayra Montrose, Office of Integrative Activities, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Rm. 1270, Arlington, VA 22230; (703) 292-8040; fax (703) 292-9040; mmontros@nsf.gov.

2011 Roberta G. Simmons Outstanding Dissertation in Medical Sociology Award. This award is given each year by ASA’s Medical Sociology section. Self-nominations are accepted. Eligible candidates must have defended their doctoral dissertations within two academic years. Candidate should submit an article-length paper (sole-authored). This paper may have been previously published, or may be in press or under review. A letter of recommendation from a faculty mentor is also required. Deadline: March 1, 2011. Contact: Sara Shostak, Brandeis University; sshostak@brandeis.edu.

The Midwest Sociological Society’s (MSS) 2011 Student Paper Competition is open to all students who are members of MSS. Graduate and undergraduate papers are judged in separate divisions with prizes in each division. Deadline: January 8, 2011. For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

North Central Sociological Association Student Paper Competition 2011. Two divisional awards: (1) Graduate Student Division and (2) Undergraduate Division. The maximum length of a paper is 5,000 words. An abstract of no more than 100 words must also be included. Papers with multiple authors will be considered provided that all authors are students in the same division category. Deadline: January 14, 2011. Contact: Carolette Norwood, Department of Africana Studies, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210370 Cincinnati, OH 45221-0370; Carolette.Norwood@uc.edu, Subject line: NCSA Student Paper Competition.

Graduate Student Paper Award. The ASA Social Psychology Section invites submissions for the Graduate Student Paper Award. The paper should be article length. Eligible papers include those that, between March 2010 and March 2011, were: submitted for a class or seminar; was a thesis or dissertation; presented at a professional meeting; submitted or accepted for publication; pre-published on a journal website; or published. Authors of eligible papers must be graduate students at the time of the paper submission. Multi-authored papers may be submitted if all authors are students, but the prize must be shared. Deadline: March 1, 2011 to: Ellen Granberg at granber@clemson.edu.

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In the News

The American Sociological Association was mentioned in an August 2 Wall Street Journal book review about a new book titled, "Higher Education?" The ASA was also mentioned in an August 2 Inside Higher Ed article about a report ASA issued on the decline in the number of academic job postings in its job bank and in an August 16, 2010 Inside Higher Ed article about the National Science Foundation’s new social science agenda.

Amarnath Amarasingam, Laurier-Waterloo, wrote an August 31 guest post for the Washington Post’s "On Faith" blog titled, "Glenn Beck and the Restoration of American Civil Religion." Robert Bellah, University of California-Berkeley, was mentioned in the post.

Bernadette Barton, Morehead State University, was quoted in an August 19 Christian Science Monitor article about her study on the Creation Museum in Petersburg, KY.

Andrew A. Beveridge, Queens College-CUNY, was quoted in an August 24 New York Times article about racial patterns in school budget votes.

William T. Bielby, University of Illinois-Chicago, and Gail McGuire, Indiana University-South Bend, were mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about their study, which looked at women’s informal networks at work. The media outlets include UPI and CNBC.com on August 16, 2010, the Toronto Sun on August 17, 2010, and a variety of others.

Amy J. Binder, University of California-San Diego, was mentioned and Kate Wood, University of California-San Diego, was quoted in an August 18, 2010 Inside Higher Ed article on their research findings about conservative college students being generally happy and accepted at "liberal Eastern" universities. The article also quoted Sarah S. Willie-LeBreton, Swarthmore College. The article was reprinted in USA Today and was also the subject of an August 20 UPI article.

David Blouin, Indiana University, was mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about his study, which found that dogs’ family status depends on the family’s locale. The media outlets include MSNBC.com on August 15, USA Today on August 19, 2010, and a variety of others.

Donna Bobbitt-Zeher, Ohio State-Marion, and Douglas Downey, Ohio State-Columbus, were mentioned or quoted in various media outlets about their study, which found that teenagers without siblings are not disadvantaged socially. The media outlets include MSNBC.com on August 16, WebMD on August 17, USA Today on August 19, The Miami Herald on August 21, The New York Times on September 12, and a variety of others.

Danah Boyd, Microsoft Research, wrote a September 6 Huffington Post column, "How Censoring Craigslist Helps, Pimps, Child Traffickers and Other Abusive Scumbags." Boyd and her Huffington Post column were mentioned in a September 7 post on the Wall Street Journal’s "Digits" blog.

Matt Bradshaw and Guang Guo, both of the University of North Carolina, Jeremy Freese, Northwestern University, Michael Shanahan, University of North Carolina, and Kristen Springer, Rutgers University, were mentioned in an August 16 U.S. News & World Report article titled, "Sociologists Looking at Risky Behavior Plunge into the Gene Pool."

Michelle Budig, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, wrote a September 30, 2010, post on The Hill’s "Congress Blog" titled, "Parenthood Exacerbates the Gender Pay Gap." The post mentioned Irene Boeckmann, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Jennifer Glass, University of Iowa, Melissa Hodges, and Joya Misra, both of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Michelle Budig, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and Paula England, Stanford University, were mentioned in a September 23 Slate article about why women need the Paycheck Fairness Act.

Robert Bullard, Clark Atlanta University, was quoted in a September 10 Ventura Country Star article about his presentation to a local environmental justice group.

Esteban Calvo, Boston College, was quoted in an August 17 U.S. News & World Report article on his research, which found benefits to retiring at or near age 62.

Richard Carpiano, University of British Columbia, was the subject of an August 28 Chicago Tribune Q&A about why neighbors are good for your health.

Anmol Chaddha and William Julius Wilson, both of Harvard University, wrote a September 12 Washington Post op-ed, "Why We’re Teaching ‘The Wire’ at Harvard."

Wendy Chapkis, University of Southern Maine, was quoted in an August 15 Portland Press Herald article about medical marijuana dispensaries.

Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in an August 27 Associated Press article about how the recession may have caused a decline the U.S. birth rate. The article appeared in various media outlets, including Yahoo!News, ABCNews.com, USA Today, the Washington Times. He was also interviewed on NPR’s "All Things Considered," on September 29 about how many Americans are increasingly getting married when it makes financial sense. The interview was also the subject of a September 29 post on NPR?s blog, "The Two-Way." Cherlin and Mark Mather, Population Reference Bureau, were also quoted in a September 28 New York Times article titled, "Saying No to ‘I Do,’ with the Economy in Mind."

Nicholas Christakis, Harvard Medical School, was quoted in a HealthDay News article about his study, which suggests that competing for a mate might shorten a man’s life. The article appeared in media outlets including Bloomberg Businessweek on August 10 and USA Today on August 13.

Cheryl Cooky, Purdue University, and Michael Messner, University of Southern California, were mentioned in an August 26 Daily Caller article about mainstream coverage of women’s sports.

Benet Davetian, University of Prince Edward Island, and Scott Schieman, University of Toronto, was quoted in a Postmedia News article about how kids are swearing at earlier ages, which appeared in various media outlets including the Calgary Herald on September 18, the Vancouver Sun on September 18, and the Ottawa Citizen on September 20.

Stefanie DeLuca, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in the September 13 issue of Time magazine. Her research on the negative consequences of delaying the transition to college cautioned the growing enthusiasm for high school graduates to take a "gap year" off before attending college.

Michele Dillon, University of New Hampshire, was interviewed on CNN on June 27 about the Catholic Church, gay pride parades, and gay marriage. She wrote a July 18 guest post for the Washington Post’s "On Faith" blog about the linkage in Vatican thinking between sex abuse and the threat of change posed by women’s ordination and was quoted in an August 15 Cleveland Plain Dealer article on the emergence of independent Catholic spirituality groups.

Peter Dreier, Occidental College, wrote a September 15 article for the Nation titled, "The Fifty Most Influential Progressives of the Twentieth Century."

Alex Dupuy, Wesleyan University, was interviewed for an August 20 AOLNews.com article about Wyclef Jean’s candidacy for president of Haiti.

Mark Edwards, Oregon State University, was quoted in a September 24 article on Central Oregon’s KTVZ.com about a report showing that more men than ever before are seeking food assistance benefits.

David Ekerdt, University of Kansas, was mentioned and Merril Silverstein, University of Southern California, was quoted in an August 30 post on the New York Times’, "The New Old Age" blog, titled "Aging’s Misunderstood Virtues."

Morten Ender, United States Military Academy, was mentioned in an August 28 Philadelphia Inquirer article about social media networking during military deployments among British, American, and Israeli troops and specifically the making of YouTube videos.

Amitai Etizioni, George Washington University, wrote a September 17 CNN.com opinion piece titled, "Why Firm Parenting Is Good Parenting."

Claude Fischer, University of California-Berkeley, and Richard Lachmann, University at Albany-SUNY, were quoted in a September 9 USA Today article, "Cellphones, Social Networks Make Eavesdropping OK?"

William Frey, Brookings Institution, Larry Griffin, University of North Carolina, and Thomas Pettigrew, University of California-Santa Cruz, were quoted in a September 18 Christian Science Monitor article, "Beyond Racism: Lessons from the South on Racial Discrimination and Prejudice."

Kathleen Fried, Arbor Consulting Partners, and Kathleen Gerson, New York University, were mentioned in an August 12 Boston Globe article about maternity leave.

Herbert Gans, Columbia University, was quoted in a September 30 post on the Forbes.com blog "Medialand."

Kathleen Gerson, New York University, was quoted in a September 23 CBSNews.com article, "Men: We Have It Tougher than Prior Generations."

Barry Glassner, Lewis & Clark College, wrote a September 27 op-ed in USA Today, "Yes, College Is Worth the Price of Admission."

Eric Grodsky, University of Minnesota, and Bill McCarthy, University of California-Davis, were mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about their study on how teen sex while in romantic relationships is generally harmless to the teens’ academics. An Associated Press article on the study appeared in various media outlets including Yahoo!News, the San Francisco Chronicle, MSNBC.com, and the Boston Globe on August 15. Articles also appeared in Salon, AOLNews.com, and CNN.com on August 16, and many others.

Adam Habib, University of Johannesburg, was quoted in an August 15, 2010, New York Times article and mentioned in an August 20, 2010, post in the Boston Globe’s "On Liberty" blog about his being barred from entering the United States and his appearance at the ASA’s 2010 annual meeting. He was also interviewed on August 14, 2010, on CNN Newsroom about the same issues.

Lisa Hajjar, University of California-Santa Barbara, was the subject of an August 12 Chronicle of Higher Education Q&A. She is working on a book about lawyers who have defended detainees since 9/11.

Benjamin Kelly, McMaster University, was mentioned and Marlene Santin, McMaster University, was quoted in an August 16, 2010 Miller-McCune article about their research on flight attendants. The article also mentioned Arlie Russell Hochschild, University of California-Berkeley.

Aaron Kupchik, University of Delaware, was interviewed in an August 29 Salon feature about his recent book, Homeroom Security: School Discipline in an Age of Fear. He was also interviewed on WAMC, Northeast Public Radio on August 18 and on New Hampshire Public Radio on September 16.

Marnia Lazreg, Hunter College, CUNY, was the subject of a July 21 Chronicle of Higher Education Q&A interview about the practice of veiling.

C.N. Le, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, was quoted in a September 7 Los Angeles Times article, "Unemployment Lasts Longer for Asian Americans," which discussed factors that make Asian Americans workers both more and less susceptible to the current recession.

Shayne Lee, Tulane University, wrote a September 26 CNN.com opinion piece, "Why Black Church Culture Rejects Homosexuality."

Zai Liang, University at Albany-SUNY, was quoted in an August 15 International Business Times article about African merchants in China.

Donald Light, University of Medicine and Dentistry, was mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about his study on the pharmaceutical industry. The media outlets include The Independent and The Telegraph on August 17 and the Yorkshire Post on August 18.

D. Michael Lindsay, Rice University, wrote an August 30 Huffington Post column, "Glenn Beck, the Faithful, and the Second Coming." He also mentioned Michael Young, University of Texas-Austin, in the column.

Charles Loeffler, Robert Sampson, and Bruce Western, all of Harvard University, were quoted in an August 18 U.S. News & World Report article, "Most Prisoners Come from Few Neighborhoods."

Ruth Lopez Turley, Rice University, was the subject of a Q&A interview and Geoffrey Wodtke, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was mentioned in an August 21 Houston Chronicle piece about their research on how where college students live affects their grades.

Richard Lloyd, Vanderbilt University, was quoted in an August 23, Washington Post article on the public reaction to the proposed "Ground Zero" mosque in Manhattan.

Ross Macmillan and Ann Meier, both of the University of Minnesota, were quoted and Shelley Correll, Stanford University, was mentioned in a September 27 Star Tribune article about the growing trend of women deciding not to have children.

Michael J. Mascarenhas, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, blogged about his work on water and sanitation issues in Rwanda in posts on the New York Times’ "Scientist at Work" blog on August 24 and 26, and September 1, 9, and 15.

Doug Massey, Princeton University, was quoted in an August 3 Christian Science Monitor article about how Arizona became ground zero for immigration reform.

Mark Mather, Population Reference Bureau, was quoted in a September 28, Associated Press article on U.S. Census data that show the recession appears to be impacting marriages and expanding the income gap. The article appeared in a variety of media outlets including Yahoo!News, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Denver Post, and the Los Angeles Times. He was also mentioned in a September 29, 2010 Wall Street Journal article on the decline of marriage rates.

Aaron M. McCright, Michigan State University, was mentioned in September 15, 2010, post on USA Today’s "Green House" blog about his study that found that women are more likely to accept climate change science than men. McCright and his research were also featured in a number of other media outlets including the Toronto Sun, UPI, and The Christian Science Monitor on September 15.

Christin Munsch, Cornell University, was mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about her study, which found that financially dependent men are more likely to cheat. The media outlets include FoxNews.com, CNN.com, MSNBC.com, and the New York Daily News on August 16, 2010, Time.com on August 21, 2010, and the New York Times on September 26, 2010.

Alondra Nelson, Columbia University, wrote a September 3 column on "The Social Life of DNA" for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s special issue on "Big Ideas for the Next Decade."

Bernice Pescosolido, Indiana University, was quoted in a September 14 MSN Health & Fitness article about her study, which found that Americans’ prejudice and discrimination toward people with serious substance abuse or mental health problems has not changed in the past 10 years. She was also quoted in a September 16 post on the Orlando Sentinel’s "Vital Signs" health blog.

Martyn Pickersgill, University of Edinburgh, was quoted in a September 4 Financial Times article about whether there is an increasing pathological narcissism.

Brian Powell, Indiana University, was quoted in a September 14 Associated Press article about his research on what Americans believe constitutes a family. The article appeared in a number of media outlets including Yahoo!News, the Denver Post, ABCNews.com, MSNBC.com, the San Francisco Chronicle, and a variety of others. Powell was also quoted on September 15 in an ABCNews.com in a New York Times article on the research. The New York Times article also quoted Stephanie Coontz, Evergreen State College.

Cesar J. Rebellon and Karen Van Gundy, both of the University of New Hampshire, were mentioned in a September 2 WebMD article about their Journal of Health and Social Behavior study, which found that marijuana’s "gateway effect" is overblown. The article also quoted Lesley Reid, Georgia State University. The study was also the subject of articles in a variety of other media outlets including the Los Angeles Times on September 2, MSN Health & Fitness on September 3, and U.S. News & World Report on September 3.

Judith Rollins, Wellesley College, was a guest on July 15, 2010 on Choice-FM Radio’s "Allison Guilbert Show" (in Nevis, West Indies) to discuss her recent publications on women in Nevis, including Voices of Concern: Nevisian Women’s Issues at the Turn of the 21st Century.

Michael J. Rosenfeld, Stanford University, was mentioned or quoted in a number of media outlets about the study he did with Reuben J. Thomas, City College of the City University of New York, which found that having Internet access at home increases the likelihood that adults will be in romantic relationships. The media outlets include Yahoo!News, UPI, and the Toronto Sun on August 16, and The Telegraph on August 17. Rosenfeld was also interviewed on August 16 on NPR’s "All Things Considered."

Wanda Rushing, University of Memphis, was quoted in a September 14 Commercial Appeal article about then new volume of "The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture" on urbanization, which she edited.

David Schaefer, Arizona State University-Tempe, was quoted in an August 17 U.S. News & World Report article about his research on depressed teenagers.

Amy Schalet, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, was quoted in a September 7 Salon article about her research on cultural attitudes regarding teenage sex in the Netherlands and the United States.

Christopher Scheitle, Pennsylvania State University, was quoted in a September 23, 2010, Telegraph article and a September 24, 2010 MSN.com article about his study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, which found that people who left a strict religious group were less likely to be in good health than those who remained in the group.

Juliet Schor, Boston College, was mentioned in a September 6, 2010 post on the New York Times’ "Dot Earth" blog, discussed about her proposal for Americans to scale back their work in an effort to move toward fuller employment and more fulfilled lives.

Melissa Sheridan Embser-Herbert, Hamline University, was quoted in a September 16 American Prospect article about the "don’t ask, don’t tell" policy in the military.

John Skrentny, University of California-San Diego, was interviewed in an August 14 piece on NPR’s "All Things Considered" about so-called birthright citizenship.

Roberta Spalter-Roth, American Sociological Association, was quoted in an August 17, 2010 Inside Higher Ed article about her research, which found that while sociology is still a popular major, there is a decreased satisfaction with the major. Nicole Van Vooren, American Sociological Association, was also mentioned in the article.

Gregory D. Squires, George Washington University, was quoted in a September 4, 2010 Washington Post article titled, "Marvin Gaye Park in NE Has Neighbors Reclaiming Their Sense of Community."

Kate Strully, University at Albany-SUNY, was mentioned in an August 3 UPI article on her study in the American Sociological Review, which highlights the benefits of the Earned Income Tax Credits anti-poverty program.

Megan Sweeney, University of California-Los Angeles, was interviewed on September 16 on American Public Media’s "Marketplace" about why the U.S. birthrate was at its lowest level in a century.

Jay Teachman, Western Washington University, was quoted in a September 10 New York Post article about his study, which found that women who are the breadwinners in their marriages are significantly more likely to get divorced.

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, wrote a September 8 Huffington Post column titled, "Bank Profits Are the Problem, Not the Solution."

Bradford Wilcox, University of Virginia, was quoted and Nicholas Wolfinger, University of Utah, was mentioned in a September 22 CNN.com article about children of divorced parents who are vowing to have enduring marriages.

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Awards

Leo Goodman, University of California-Berkeley, received the 2010 Paul Lazarsfeld Award from the ASA Methodology Section.

Gladys García-López, University of California-Santa Barbara, received the Sociologists for Women in Society Cheryl Allyn Miller Award in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the field of women and work.

Veronica Montes, University of California-Santa Barbara, received the Sociologists for Women in Society Esther Ngan-ling Chow and Mareyjoyce Green Scholarship for her dissertation "The Development and Transformation of Household Social and Economic Strategies of Mexican Families as They Become Transnational: A Multi-Sited Ethnographic Approach."

Josephine Akosua Adomako Ampofo, University of Ghana-Legon, received the Sociologists for Women in Society Feminist Activism Award.

Joya Misra, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, received the Sociologists for Women in Society Mentoring Award.

Nancy Naples, University of Connecticut, was named the Sociologists for Women in Society 2011 Distinguished Feminist Lecturer.

Sarah K. Bruch, University of Wisconsin-Madison, received the Beth B. Hess Memorial Scholarship, awarded annually by Sociologists for Women in Society, with the American Sociological Association and the Society for the Study of Social Problems, to a graduate student in sociology who began her or his college career at a two-year community or technical college.

Tyrone A. Forman, Emory University, received an Alphonse Fletcher Sr. Fellowship. The award is given to a small number of faculty each year who are nationally recognized leaders in their respective fields and whose work advances the goals of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision.

Carter Butts, University of California-Irvine, received the 2010 Leo Goodman Award from the ASA Methodology Section.

Larry Isaac, Vanderbilt University, recently received the Distinguished Lectureship Award from the Southern Sociological Society for 2010-2011, the 2010 Clifford Geertz Prize for Best Article from the ASA Section on Sociology of Culture, and the Distinguished Scholarly Article Award from the ASA Section on Labor and Labor Movements.

Patricia A. Adler, University of Colorado, and Peter Adler, University of Denver, received the George Herbert Mead Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction

Joseph A. Kotarba, University of Houston, received the Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction.

Tammy Anderson, University of Delaware, received the Charles Horton Cooley Award from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction.

Marc Eaton, University of Colorado, received the Herbert Blumer Graduate Student Paper Award from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction.

James A. Davis, National Opinion Research Center’s General Social Survey and Harvard University, was awarded the 2010 Warren J. Mitofsky Award for Excellence in Public Opinion Research by the Board of Directors of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research.

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Transitions

Steve Carlton-Ford was recently promoted to full professor and is now Head of the Sociology Department at the University of Cincinnati.

Havidán Rodríguez, University of Delaware, has accepted a position as provost and vice president of academic affairs at the University of Texas-Pan American in Edinburg, Texas.

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People

Riley E. Dunlap, Oklahoma State University, has been elected a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Robert D. Mare, University of California-Los Angeles, presented "The Multigenerational Demography of Social Mobility" at Pennsylvania State University’s 5th Annual De Jong Lecture in Social Demography.

Wendy Simonds, Georgia State University, was elected the 2011-12 President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.

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New Books

Daniel Béland, University of Calgary, and Robert Henry Cox, Eds., Ideas and Politics in Social Science Research (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Ivy Bourgeault, University of Ottowa, Robert Dingwall, University of Nottingham, and Raymond De Vries, University of Michigan, Eds., The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Methods in Health Research (SAGE, 2010).

James J. Chriss, Cleveland State University, Ed., Social Control: Informal, Legal, and Medical (Emerald, 2010).

Francesco Duina, Bates College, Winning: Reflections on an American Obsession (Princeton University Press, 2010).

B. Feuillet-Liger, K. Orfali, Columbia University, and T. Callus, Eds., Who Is My Genetic Parent? Donor Anonymity and Assisted Reproduction: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Bruylant, 2010).

Lori Freedman, University of California-San Francisco, Willing and Unable: Doctors’ Constraints in Abortion Care (Vanderbilt University Press, 2010).

Jack Levinson, City College of New York, Making Life Work: Freedom and Disability in a Community Group Home (University of Minnesota Press, 2010).

Rachel Schurman, University of Minnesota, and William Munro, Illinois Wesleyan University, Fighting for the Future of Food: Activists vs. Agribusiness in the Struggle over Biotechnology (University of Minnesota Press, 2010).

Christian Smith, University of Notre Dame, What Is a Person? Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good from the Person Up (University of Chicago Press, 2010).

Steven Whitman, Ami Shah, Maureen Benjamins, Sinai Urban Health Institute, Eds., Urban Health: Combating Disparities with Local Data (Oxford University Press, 2010).

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Other Organizations

The Sociological Quarterly. The Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) seeks an individual with a distinguished scholarly record and editorial experience to be the next editor of The Sociological Quarterly (TSQ). Since 1960, the journal’s contributors, peer-reviewers, advisory editors, and readers have made it one of the leading generalist journals in the field. The editor solicits, reviews, and makes decisions about all manuscript submissions. Appointment begins March 1, 2012. The new editor will edit volumes published in 2013-2016. Contact MSS at (608)787-8551; MidwestSS@centurytel.net; www.TheMSS.org.

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Contact

Melissa Hotlzman, an associate professor of sociology at Ball State University, is preparing a Master’s-level grant-writing course for the Spring semester and is interested in hearing from those who presently teach (or will be teaching) similar courses. Contact Hotlzman at mkholtzman@bsu.edu.

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Caught in the Web

The Versatile PhD. This online community was created in 1999 by Paula Chambers to help humanists and social scientists explore non-academic careers. The community recently matured into The Versatile PhD, a web-based discussion forum supported by a premium content subscription service. The Versatile PhD community has about 2,300 members and is quite vibrant, with experienced people helping out beginners and everybody exchanging a wealth of ideas, information, and moral support. The site serves all humanities and social science disciplines and invites more sociologists to join. Basic membership is free and open to all. Sociologists working outside the academy are specially invited to contact Chambers about a possible writing opportunity. Contact: paula@versatilephd.com; versatilephd.com.

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Summer Programs

Congregations and Social Change: Adaptation and Innovation among Religious Communities. June 27-July 22, 2011, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI. This seminar focuses on the ongoing changes and negotiations that religious congregations make in relation to the broader social world, engaging these issues in a historically sensitive way, informed by scholarship rooted in a sociological perspective. Deadline: January 14, 2011. For more information, visit www.calvin.edu/scs.

Crime & Justice Summer Research Institute: Broadening Perspectives & Participation. July 11-29, 2011, Ohio State University. This institute is designed to promote successful tenure/careers among faculty from underrepresented groups working in areas of crime and criminal justice. Participants will complete an ongoing project in preparation for journal submission or agency funding review. The Institute will provide living and travel expenses for the duration of the workshop and will culminate in a research symposium. Deadline: February 11, 2011. Contact: kennedy.312@sociology.osu.edu; cjrc.osu.edu/rdcj-n/summerinstitute.

From Worldview to Worship: The Liturgical Turn in Cultural Theory. June 20-July 8, 2011, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI. This seminar examines a new paradigm for the study of religion, one that focuses on liturgical practices broadly conceived, rather than on beliefs and doctrines. We will examine the significance of this liturgical turn for both scholarly fields (philosophy, religion, sociology) and Christian ministry (campus ministry, worship youth ministry). Participants will to grapple with some of the primary texts behind the "turn to practice" in order to consider the implications of the liturgical turn for their area of research or practice. Deadline: January 14, 2011. For more information, visit www.calvin.edu/scs.

Training Program for Scientists Conducting Research to Reduce HIV/STI Health Disparities. Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS), University of California-San Francisco. Scientists interested in pursuing independent research careers and funding are invited to apply to the CAPS Training Program. Scientists conducting social and behavioral HIV-prevention research in racial and ethnic minority communities will receive intensive mentorship and research training from leading UCSF faculty to assist them in obtaining large-scale funding for their independent HIV-prevention research programs. Program participants are supported for three summers in San Francisco, receive funds to conduct pilot studies, and are guided in analyzing their pilot study data and in developing a full research proposal. Contact: Jackie Ramos, 50 Beale Street, Suite 1300, San Francisco, CA 94105; (415) 597-4976; jackie.ramos@ucsf.edu; www.caps.ucsf.edu/CAPS/about/fellows/minorityindex.php.

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