FOOTNOTES February 2001
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FAD Funded Again!

The Sociology Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) has made an award of $165,000 to support ASA’s Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD). The additional three years of funding continues an important, long-term collaboration between NSF and ASA. “FAD is venture capital to invest in important scientific research in the discipline,” said Felice J. Levine, ASA Executive Officer and principal investigator of the grant. We have considerable evidence of how this seed money has led to important projects, field-shaping conferences, and publications in sociology.”

Co-principal investigator, Roberta Spalter-Roth noted, “The evaluations by the NSF review panel were uniformly positive about the FAD program, praising the ‘venturesome’ and ‘cutting edge’ quality of the funded projects, the high publication rates, and the influence outside the confines of the discipline.” (See the story on the impact of FAD projects).

The small grant program operates with ASA matching NSF grant on a dollar-for-dollar basis so that $150,000 in NSF support yields $300,000 in research investment (or $100,000 per year). By providing small grants to support groundbreaking research initiatives and other important scientific activities such as research conferences, FAD nurtures the development of knowledge that advances sociology as a discipline. FAD offers two opportunities per year to submit proposals (June and December). “This collaboration between ASA and NSF is very important, for both the funding it provides as well as the stimulus to quality basic research,” says Levine. “Many of our FAD grantees have gone on to apply to the NSF Sociology Program, to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and to other support programs for more full blown projects.”

As a result of this renewal, the maximum ceiling for individual grants will increase from $5,000 to $7,000, effective with the next funding deadline of June 15, 2001. An Advisory Committee, consisting of five members of ASA’s elected Council (current Council members include Richard Alba, Diane Brown, Michael Burawoy, Paul DiMaggio, and Richard Flacks), and the principal investigator and co-principal investigator (Felice J. Levine and Roberta Spalter-Roth, respectively) evaluate FAD submissions, decide upon awards, and provide written evaluations for all applicants. Information about submissions can be obtained on ASA’s web site (www.asanet.org/student/fad.html). Brief descriptions of the latest round of FAD awards can also be found on ASA’s web site (www.asanet.org/footnotes/dec00/fns.html). For additional information call or e-mail Roberta Spalter-Roth (202-383-9005 or spalter-roth@asanet.org) or program assistant Drew Sutter (research@asanet.org).