July/August 2011 Issue • Volume 39 • Issue 6

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Announcements

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Correction

Andrea Borella, University of Turin-Italy, was mistakenly identified as female in his "In the News" listing in the May/June 2011 issue of Footnotes.


Call for Papers

Publications

Memory and Reflexivity and Memory and Data Banks. We invite abstracts of working papers for review and inclusion in a book proposal package on the role of memory in reflexivity (Part I) and memory in banked data (Part II). Memory and Reflexivity – In the historical social sciences, reflexivity in relationship to memory has been conceptualized along two dimensions. The first dimension, reflecting the Durkheimian School, conceptualized reflexivity as a form of social construction. The second dimension is described as an awareness among individuals, groups, and institutional systems about the deep roles played by the processes of social construction in organizing and conditioning their interpretative skills and sensibilities. Memory and Data Banks – Modern society depends on data storage banks, filled with electronic memories of our identity practices. Banked memories, however, present problems along the private/ public boundary. As new "commodities," these memories are not owned, or managed, by the social agent who generated the memory. Send Part I inquiries and abstracts to Luca Mori at luca.mori@univr.it and send Part II inquires and abstracts to Noel Packard at packardn@prodigy.net. Deadline: Ongoing. Contact: Noel Packard, 1459 N. Camino Alto, #205, Vallejo, CA 94589; (707) 557-5493; packardn@prodigy.net.

Poverty in America: Health and Well-Being Among the Vulnerable, edited by Kevin Fitzpatrick. This three-volume interdisciplinary collection will explore the challenges and solutions in addressing the public health crisis among America’s poor. While providing theoretical and empirical insights, contributors will be asked to prepare manuscripts for one of the three volumes. The first volume explores the general challenges of health and health care among low- and no-income populations; a second volume is devoted exclusively to health and healthcare issues among the homeless; and a third volume focuses on the link between health and place and its impact on America’s poor. Contributors should propose a chapter for one of these volumes. E-mail a proposal of no more than 900 words and a two-page CV to Kevin Fitzpatrick kfitzpa@uark.edu. Deadline: September 15, 2011. For more information, see sociology.uark.edu/3550.php and click on "Poverty and Health in America."

Research in the Sociology of Health Care. Papers are being sought for volume 30 of Research in the Sociology of Health Care published by Emerald Press. The major theme for this volume is issues in health and health care related to race/ethnicity, immigration, SES, and gender, especially papers dealing with macro-level system issues and micro-level issues. Papers that focus on linkages to policy, population concerns and either patients or providers of care as ways to meet health care needs of people both in the United States and in other countries are welcome. For papers examining issues in health and health care in countries other than the United States, the focus could be on issues of delivery systems in those countries and ways in which revisions and changes impact health or health care. The volume will contain 10 to 14 papers, generally between 20 and 40 pages in length. Deadline: February 1, 2012. Contact: Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld, Sociology Program, School of Social and Family Dynamics, Box 873701, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3701; (480) 965-8053; Jennie.Kronenfeld@asu.edu.

Sociology of Health and Illness Monograph. Proposals are invited for volume 20 in the monograph series to be published by Sociology of Health and Illness in conjunction with Wiley-Blackwell Publishers. The monograph will comprise 8 to 10 peer-reviewed papers and will appear both as a special issue of the journal and in book form. Financial support is available to support a day-long meeting to launch the published monograph. The proposal should be no more than 2,000 words. Deadline: August 1, 2011. Contact: Monograph Editor, Hannah Bradby at H.Bradby@warwick.ac.uk. For more information, visit www.blackwellpublishing.com/shil_enhanced/.

Solving Social Problems provides a forum for the description and measurement of social problems, with a keen focus on the concrete remedies proposed for their solution. The series takes an international perspective, exploring social problems in various parts of the world, with the central concern being always their possible remedy. Works on diverse subjects are welcome. In addition to recommending solutions to social problems, the books in this series are theoretically sophisticated, exploring previous discussions of the issues in question, examining other attempts to resolve them, and adopting and discussing methodologies that are commonly used to measure social problems. Proposed solutions may be framed as changes in policy or practice, or more broadly as social change and social movement. Solutions may be reflective of ideology, but are always pragmatic and detailed, explaining the means by which the suggested solutions might be achieved. Contact: Bonnie Berry at solving@socialproblems.org or Neil Jordan at njordan@ashgatepublishing.com; www.ashgate.com/sociology.

Meetings

33rd Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, March 22-24, 2012, Asheville, NC. Theme: "Spiritual Matters/Matters of the Spirit." From Romanticism’s spiritual resurgence to the interrogations of Darwinism and science, the 19th century was immersed in conversation about the place of spirituality and religion in society, politics, and the arts. Paper and panel proposals are welcome on all aspects of belief, religion, and spirituality from 1789-1914. E-mail abstracts (250 words) for 20-minute papers with the author’s name and paper title in the heading, as well as a one-page CV to Phylis Floyd, floyd@msu.edu, and Michael Duffy, duffym@ecu.edu. Deadline: September 30, 2011. For more information, visit www.english.uwosh.edu/roth/ncsa/.

2012 Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Sociological Association, April 4-7, 2012, Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego, CA. Abstracts for posters and papers are invited as well as suggestions of topics for panels and poster sessions. Presentations of research in applied and academic sociology are welcome. The structure of presentations is flexible; potential contributors are encouraged to send abstracts for individual research papers, posters, complete sessions, thematic sessions, panel discussions, software demonstrations, and more. Deadline: October 17, 2011. Contact: Charlie Tolbert at ssaprogram@baylor.edu; www.sssaonline.org.

California Sociological Association 22nd Annual Meeting, November 4-5, 2011, Berkeley Marina Hotel. Theme: "California and the World." Send proposals for sessions, panels, abstracts of papers to Tony Waters at twaters@csuchico.edu. For more information, visit www.csufresno.edu/csa/conference/conference.html.

Hong Kong Sociological Association 13th Annual Conference, December 3, 2011, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Theme: "Global Sociology for a Global World." In the process of globalization, sociological research has transcended national and trans-national levels of analysis. Important issues remain with regard to our understanding about the complex interplays between the global and the local. The conference aims to draw discussions about this valuable theme and encourage presentations contributing to the development of a more global sociology or to a better understanding of local issues in the global context. Papers from sociologists and colleagues in the social sciences are welcome. Prospective participants can apply to present a paper or organize a panel. Deadline: September 15, 2011. Contact: Queena NG, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong; fax 852 26 03 52 13; HKSA2011@cuhk.edu.hk.

Work and Family Researcher Network (WFRN) Inaugural Conference, June 14-16, 2012, Philadelphia, PA. Theme: "Interdisciplinary Conversations." We invite submissions of papers, posters, and symposia proposals that address all aspects of work and family issues. Researchers and scholars from all disciplines are encouraged to participate. Consistent with the WFRN’s mission to advance, promote, and disseminate work and family research and to encourage knowledge and understanding of work and family issues among a broad community of stakeholders, WFRN welcomes proposals for innovative sessions such as professional development of work and family scholars; delivering high-quality teaching and training in work and family issues for students, managers and policy makers; developing work and family researchers’ effectiveness at communicating their research to the press as well as to policymakers; and translating research into organizational, community, and policy interventions. Deadline: September 30, 2011. Contact: workandfamily@sas.upenn.edu. For more information, visit wfrn.createsend3.com/t/r/l/jtuhlhd/nuduuhtkl/h/.

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Meetings

August 19, 2011. The Crisis and Contradictions of Consumption, University of Nevada-Las Vegas. Sponsored by the Consumer Studies Research Network. Registration deadline: July 15. For more information, visit csrn.camden.rutgers.edu/.

August 19-22, 2011. Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) Summer Meeting, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV. SWS will be holding their meeting in conjunction with the ASA Annual Meeting. For more information, visit www.socwomen.org.

August 20, 2011. The Integrated Health Interview Series (IHIS) Workshop, 6:30-8:15pm, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV. The free workshop will focus on the IHIS database. For more information, visit training.pop.umn.edu/asa2011/registration.

August 23, 2011. The Policy and Research Workshop: Using the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) in Research, 8:30am-10:10am, Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, NV. The free workshop will cover all of the IPUMS databases. For more information, visit training.pop.umn.edu/asa2011/registration.

September 16-17, 2011. The Public Mission of the Social Sciences and Humanities: Transformation and Renewal, Social Science Research Center Berlin, Berlin, Germany, co-sponsored by the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and others. For more information and for free conference registration, visit publicsphere.ssrc.org/initiative-academia-public-sphere/.

October 22, 2011. First Annual Public Sociology Graduate Conference, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. For more information, visit gmusocgrads.wordpress.com/activities/grad-conference-2011/.

November 4-5, 2011. California Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Doubletree Berkeley Marina. Theme: "California and the World" Contact: Tony Waters at twaters@csuchico.edu; www.csufresno.edu/csa.

December 3, 2011. Hong Kong Sociological Association 13th Annual Conference, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Theme: "Global Sociology for a Global World." Contact: Queena NG, Department of Sociology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong; by fax 852 26 03 52 13; HKSA2011@cuhk.edu.hk.

March 22-24, 2012. 33rd Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, Asheville, NC. Theme: "Spiritual Matters/Matters of the Spirit." Contact:  Phylis Floyd, floyd@msu.edu or Michael Duffy, duffym@ecu.edu. For more information, visit www.english.uwosh.edu/roth/ncsa/.

April 4-7, 2012. 2012 Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Sociological Association, Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego, CA. Contact: Charlie Tolbert at ssaprogram@baylor.edu; www.sssaonline.org.

June 14-16, 2012. Work and Family Researcher Network (WFRN) Inaugural Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Theme: "Interdisciplinary Conversations." Contact: workandfamily@sas.upenn.edu. For more information, visit wfrn.createsend3.com/t/r/l/jtuhlhd/nuduuhtkl/h/.

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Funding

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Research Grant Program funds research on a wide variety of topics related to the mission of LSAC. Specifically included in the program’s scope are projects investigating precursors to legal training, selection into law schools, legal education, and the legal profession. To be eligible for funding, a research project must inform either the process of selecting law students or legal education itself in a demonstrable way. The program welcomes proposals for research proceeding from any of a variety of methodologies, a potentially broad range of topics, and varying time frames. Proposals will be judged on the importance of the questions addressed, their relevance to the mission of LSAC, the quality of the research designs, and the capacity of the researchers to carry out the project. Deadlines: February 1 and September 1. www.lsacnet.org/LSACResources/Grants/lsac-legal-education-grant-program.asp.

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Fellowships

The Abe Fellowship is designed to encourage international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The objectives of the program are to foster high quality research in the social sciences and related disciplines, to build new collaborative networks of researchers around the three thematic foci of the program, to bring new data and new data resources to the attention of those researchers, and to obtain from them a commitment to a comparative or transnational line of inquiry. For more information, contact Fernando Rojas at abe@ssrc.org.

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) 2010-11 Fellowship Competitions. With nearly $15 million recently awarded to 350 scholars worldwide, ACLS is a major source of support for humanistic scholarship in the United States. ACLS Fellowships and grants include ACLS Fellows, individual scholars conducting research on topics in the humanities and related social sciences; Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellows and Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellows, scholars at specific stages of the academic career embarking on large-scale research projects; ACLS Digital Innovation Fellows and ACLS Collaborative Research Fellows, whose projects demonstrate the range and value of alternative research methods; Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellows and Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellows in American Art, early career scholars conducting dissertation research or completing the dissertation; ACLS New Faculty Fellows, recent PhDs appointed to two-year positions at universities and colleges across the United States where their particular research and teaching expertise augment departmental offerings. The 2011-12 competitions open at the end of July. For more information, visit www.acls.org/programs/comps/.

Princeton Society of Fellows invites applications for three-year postdoctoral fellowships, 2012-2015, for recent PhDs in humanities or allied social sciences. Four appointments to pursue research and teach half-time in the following areas: Open discipline (two fellowships), Humanistic Studies, and East Asian Studies. Stipend 2012-13: approximately $76,000. Deadline: September 30, 2011. For more information, visit www.princeton.edu/sf.

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Competitions

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis is soliciting nominations for its Book Award, which will recognize the book published in 2011 that best furthers understanding of the American Civil Rights Movement and its legacy. The recipient of the award will receive $1,000 and deliver an address in the Hooks Institute Lecture Series during the 2012-2013 academic year. One copy of the book should be submitted, postmarked by December 1, 2011, to Book Award Nomination, The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change, 107 Scates Hall, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, 38152-3530. Only non-fiction books originally published in 2011 will be eligible for submission. Contact: Aram Goudsouzian, University of Memphis, Department of History, (901) 678-2520 or agoudszn@memphis.edu.

Marian Madison Gypsy Lore Society Young Scholar’s Prize in Romani Studies. The Gypsy Lore Society established the Marian Madison Gypsy Lore Society Young Scholar’s Prize in Romani Studies for the best unpublished paper by a young scholar on a topic in Gypsy and Traveler Studies. The prize is $500. The winning paper will be published in an issue of the journal Romani Studies. Papers written in English by undergraduate students, graduate students beyond their first year of study, and those holding the PhD for no more than three years are eligible to compete. Any topic that would be deemed appropriate for Romani Studies will be considered. The selection committee will look for self-contained scholarly articles of publishable quality that treat some relevant topic in an interesting and insightful way. Deadline: October 30, 2011. Contact: Katalin Kovalcsik, Gypsy Lore Society Prize Competition, Institute of Musicology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pf 28, H-1250 Budapest, Hungary; kovalcsik@zti.hu.

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In the News

The American Sociological Association (ASA) was mentioned in a May 17 LiveScience.comarticle about why men and women with power may be more likely than those without power to cheat on their spouses. An ASA research was also mentioned in a May 17 Chronicle of Higher Education article, "Social Scientists’ Wages Struggle to Keep Pace with Inflation."

An American Sociological Review (ASR) study was mentioned in an April 28 Reuters article about how the recent housing crash disproportionately hurt minority neighborhoods. An ASR study was also mentioned in a May 2 Athens Banner-Herald article about how excessive spending on incarceration could be redirected toward education. Another ASR study was mentioned in a May 9 United Press International article, "How to Mitigate Family Career Disadvantage." 

Amy Bailey, Christy Glass, and Peg Petrzelka, all of Utah State University, were quoted in an April 27 Utah Statesmen article about how Utah has the largest gender wage gap of any state in the country.

Bonnie Berry, Social Problems Research Group, was recently interviewed by Index Magazine about appearance bias.

Terry Besser, Iowa State University, was quoted in a May 27 Des Moines Register article, "Cities Strive to Embrace Growing Hispanic Shops."

Anthony P. Browne, CUNY-Hunter College, wrote an op-ed on President Obama and black leadership that appeared in the April 7-13 issue of the New York Amsterdam News.

Robert Crosnoe, University of Texas-Austin, was mentioned in a May 12 post on the Houston Chronicle’s "Mom Houston" blog about his research, which found that teens who are bullied and socially ostracized are much less likely to go to college.

William D’Antonio, Catholic University of America, was quoted in a May 7 Arizona Republic article about his poll, which found that a majority of Catholics in Phoenix believe Bishop Olmsted misused his authority in revoking the Catholic status of St. Joseph’s Hospital after the hospital terminated a pregnancy to save the life of a mother.

Kathleen Denny, University of Maryland, was quoted in an April 12 AOL.com article about her study, which found that the Boy Scout and Girl Scout manuals are highly gender-stereotyped, with Boy Scouts, much more so than Girl Scouts, being directed toward science, math, and career-oriented pursuits. Denny’s study was also mentioned in an April 11 ABC News Radio article.

Michele Dillon, University of New Hampshire, discussed a Public Religion Research Institute report indicating strong support among Catholics for gay rights on BloggingheadsTV. Her comments were excerpted by the New York Times online on March 25 and reported in several news outlets, including NPR.

Peter Dreier, Occidental College, wrote a May 1 Daily News op-ed arguing that banks should pay for foreclosures.

Francesco Duina, Bates College, Andrew Perrin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and Jeremy Straughn, Purdue University, were quoted in a May 2 LiveScience.com article about why bin Laden’s death brought America together for one night. The article also appeared on Yahoo!News on May 2.

Rachel Dwyer, Ohio State University, was referenced in Science Daily on June 6 regarding her study on self-esteem and credit card and college loan debt held by young adults aged 18 to 27.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, Rice University, was quoted in a May 5 LiveScience.com article about her study concerning spirituality among elite atheist scientists.

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, wrote a June 3 CNN.com column, "Gmail Hacking a Sign of Cyberattack Threat."

S. Michael Gaddis, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, wrote an op-ed piece, "Rethinking Accountability Models in U.S. Public Education," in the June 2 Atlanta Journal-Constitution. The article addresses the recent Atlanta and Washington DC cheating scandal and the unintended consequences of educational accountability.

Al Gedicks, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, wrote a May 20 Milwaukee Journal Sentinel op-ed, "What’s the Rush for Mine Permitting."

Jennifer Glass, University of Iowa, had her letter to the editor on "Mothers in the Workforce" published in the May 14 New York Times.

Joseph C. Hermanowicz, University of Georgia, and Gaye Tuchman, University of Connecticut, were quoted in a May 16 Inside Higher Ed article about how the American professoriate is changing, with tenured and tenure-track professors frequently being replaced by adjuncts.

Arlie Hochschild, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted on June 7 in The Washington Post’s "BlogPost" about a recently expanded employment service that provides senior women, or "grandmas," for child care, housekeeping, cooking, and pet sitting.

Alexander Janus, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted in a June 5 Miller-McCune article "On Immigration Polls, a Lot of People Lie."

A Journal of Health and Social Behaviorstudy was mentioned in a May 25 Wall Street Journal article about how first-graders attending school in negative classroom environments (e.g., where teachers are exhausted or there aren’t enough materials) show more signs of stress.

Maria Kefalas, Saint Joseph’s University, was mentioned in a June 6 Philadelphia Inquirer column, "A Viral Approach to Ending Violent Relationships."

Maria Kefalas, Saint Joseph’s University, was quoted and Patrick Carr, Rutgers University, Frank Furstenberg, and Laura Napolitano, both of University of Pennsylvania, were mentioned in a June 8 Vancouver Sun article about their study, which found that young adults still tend to view marriage as an important life commitment to which they aspire.

Hyun Sik Kim, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was quoted in a June 3 USA Today article about his American Sociological Review study, which found that divorce may negatively affect children’s math scores and social skills. Kim’s study was also the subject of articles in a number of other media outlets including The Huffington Post, Reuters, U.S. News and World Report, TIME.com, FoxNews.com, and United Press International on June 2. His research was also a topic on a June 3 episode of The View.

Michael Kimmel, SUNY-Stony Brook, wrote a May 27 Ms. Magazine column on "Dominique Strauss-Kahn and the Myth of Consent."

Fred Markowitz, Northern Illinois University, was quoted in a June 8 PsychCentral.com article about his Social Psychology Quarterly study, which found that mothers who held negative attitudes toward their mentally ill children could impede their recovery.

Janice McCabe, Florida State University, was mentioned in a May 5 post on the New York Times "Arts Beat" blog about her recent study on gender representations in children’s books throughout the 20th century. The study was also the subject of articles in other media outlets including The Guardian and FoxNews.com (May 6), LiveScience.com (May 9), the National Post (May 12), and the San Francisco Chronicle (May 16).

Shannon M. Monnat, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was interviewed on April 25 on KNPR’s "State of Nevada" about social explanations for the gender wage gap in Nevada.

Janet Poppendieck, CUNY-Hunter College, was quoted in a June 7 Minnesota Public Radio article about a coalition that has launched an effort to fight hunger in Minnesota.

David Purcell, Kent State University, was quoted in a May 8 Cleveland Plain-Dealer article about how American culture has changed since 9/11.

Liana Sayer, Ohio State University, and Sharon Hays, University of Southern California, were mentioned in a May 6 Savannah Morning News article about the growing number of working mothers who face challenges ranging from securing high-status jobs and promotions to juggling work, housework, and childcare.

Shane Sharp, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was quoted in a Lifescript.com article (April 24) and a Shape.com article (May 5) about his Social Psychology Quarterly study, which found that praying helped victims of violent relationships regain their sense of self-worth.

A Social Psychology Quarterly study was mentioned in a May 9 Mail & Guardian Online article about how size-based discrimination and prejudice may damage the overall physical health of overweight people.

Kristen W. Springer and Dawne M. Mouzon, both of Rutgers University, were mentioned in an April 30 Wall Street Journal article for their Journal of Health and Social Behavior study, which found that older men with stereotypically masculine attitudes are less likely than their peers to seek preventive health care.

Jessi Streib, University of Michigan, was quoted in a June 7 Vancouver Sun article about her study, which found that working-class disengagement with academia may begin before students enter kindergarten.

Jaye Cee Whitehead, Pacific University, wrote a May 16 New York Times op-ed criticizing the recent trend of promoting same-sex marriage on the basis that it will stimulate the economy. Whitehead encouraged readers to support gay marriage as a civil right, not as a moneymaker.

Kristi Williams, Ohio State University, was quoted in a June 2 Los Angeles Times article about her American Sociological Review study, which found that mothers who have their first child out of wedlock described their health at age 40 as poorer than did other mothers. Williams’ study was also the subject of articles in a number of other media outlets, including My Health News Daily on June 2, MSNBC.com on June 3 and Indian Express on June 5. William Avison, University of Western Ontario, was also quoted in the June 3 MSNBC.com article.

Fletcher Winston, Mercer University, appeared on WGXA/ABC-TV NewsCentral (Macon, Georgia) on May 24 to discuss a recent Census report concerning gender differences in advanced degree attainment.

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Awards

Sherry Cable, University of Tennessee, Thomas Shriver and Tamara Mix, both of Oklahoma State University, received the Allan Schnaiberg Outstanding Publication Award for their 2008 article "Risk Society and Contested Illness: The Case of Nuclear Weapons Workers" in the American Sociological Review from the Environment & Technology Section of the ASA.

Dalton Conley, New York University, was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. He was appointed on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise from a group of almost 3,000 applicants. 

Robert Crutchfield, University of Washington, was named a 2011 American Society of Criminology Fellow.

Christopher Gibson, Brown University, received the ECF Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.

Myra Marx Ferree, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was recently awarded the Alice H.Cook Professorship from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. She was given the opportunity to name her professorship and chose Cook pioneering feminist social research.

James W. Messerschmidt, University of Southern Maine, was awarded the 2010-11 MacPherson Award for Outstanding Feminist Faculty by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program for his outstanding contribution to feminist scholarship, teaching, and service to the Program.

Roslyn Arlin Mickelson, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, received the 2011 First Citizens Bank Scholars Medal presented by the University of North Carolina-Charlotte to honor faculty scholarship and intellectual inquiry.

Mark Sheldon Mizruchi, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. He was appointed on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise from a group of almost 3,000 applicants. 

Torin Monahan, Vanderbilt University, received the inaugural Surveillance Studies Book Prize of the International Surveillance Studies Network for his book Surveillance in the Time of Insecurity.

Alexandra K. Murphy, Princeton University, received the ECF Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.

Ruther Peterson, Ohio State University, received the 2011 Edwin H. Sutherland Award from the American Society of Criminology, which recognizes outstanding contributions to theory or research in criminology on the etiology of criminal and deviant behavior, the criminal justice system, corrections, law, or justice.

Hery Pontell, University of California-Irvine, received the 2011 Herbert Bloch Award, which recognizes outstanding service contributions to the American Society of Criminology and to the professional interests of criminology.

Monica Prasad, Northwestern University, received the Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.

Paul M. Roman, University of Georgia, is the 2011 appointee to the Regents’ Professorship at the University of Georgia, recognizing excellence in scholastic achievement. Roman is the first member of the Department of Sociology to be honored since the award began in 1948.

Sadia Saeed, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, has been elected to American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellows Program.

Olga Shevchenko, Williams College, received an American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship.

R. Tyson Smith, Rutgers University, has been elected to American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellows Program.

Ralph Taylor, Temple University, was named a 2011 American Society of Criminology Fellow.

Steven Michael Tipton, Emory University, was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.

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Transitions

Michael Bader will join the American University Department of Sociology as Assistant Professor of Sociology in fall 2011.

Monica Biradavolu, American University, has been appointed Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Assistant Director of the new American University Center on Health, Risk, and Society.

Kim Blankenship, American University, has been appointed Professor of Sociology, Chair of the Department of Sociology, and founding Director of the new American University Center on Health, Risk, and Society.

Feinian Chen joined the Department of Sociology at University of Maryland in the fall of 2010 as an Associate Professor.

Bonnie Thornton Dill, University of Maryland, has been appointed dean of the College of Arts and Humanities.

Myra Marx Ferree has received the Alice H. Cook Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dana Fisher joined the Department of Sociology at University of Maryland as Associate Professor in the spring of 2011.

Viktor Gecas, Purdue University, retired in May 2011.

Antwan Jones has joined the Department of Sociology at George Washington University as an Assistant Professor.

Kelly Joyce will serve as the next Dean of Undergraduate Studies at William & Mary.

Michael Kimmel, Stony Brook University, received the rare honor of Distinguished Professor by the State University of New York system.

Meredith Kleykamp joined the University of Maryland in the fall of 2010 as an Assistant Professor in sociology and as a Faculty Associate of the Maryland Population Research Center.

Kelly Moore will serve as Program Officer in the National Science Foundation Program on Science, Knowledge and Technology, and as a member of the Foundation’s Ethics and Values in Science Program beginning July 1, 2011.

Christina Prell joined the Department of Sociology at University of Maryland as an Assistant Professor in the spring of 2011.

Rasawn Ray joined the Department of Sociology at University of Maryland in the fall of 2010 as an Assistant Professor.

Randa Serhan will join the American University Department of Sociology in fall 2011 as Assistant Professor of Sociology and Director of the Arab Studies program.

Adam Shapiro was appointed Dean of the College of Humanities, Arts, Behavioral and Social Sciences at California State University-San Marcos.

Renée T. White has been appointed Dean of the Simmons College School of Arts and Sciences in Boston.

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People

Delia Baldassari, Princeton University, was named a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar Class of 2011-12.

Dan Clawson and Naomi R. Gerstel, both of the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, were named Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholars Class of 2011-12. This working group will write a book examining how workplace time—scheduled hours, flex time, overtime, and vacation—is controlled and allocated.

Andrew J. Cognard-Black, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, received a Fulbright to lecture at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia in spring 2012.

Paul J. DiMaggio, Princeton University, was named a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar Class of 2011-12. He will analyze how the choices of individual members within social networks may influence those of other members and whether these "network effects" impact inequality by reinforcing advantages or disadvantages.

Jennifer Lee, University of California-Irvine, was named a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar Class of 2011-12. She will write a book analyzing and comparing the different pathways to upward mobility of the children of Mexican, Chinese, and Vietnamese immigrants, as well as native-born whites and blacks.

Natalia Sarkisian, Boston College, was named a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar Class of 2011-12. She will write a book examining how social class and race shape kin support in the United States.

Christine Schiwietz, Georgetown University, was elected 2012 President of the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

David Segal, University of Maryland, has been a consultant to the Executive Office of the President on military spouse employment. He was also invited to the announcement of the President’s initiative in support of military families in April.

Gregory D. Squires, George Washington University, was elected Vice Chair of the Governing Board of the Urban Affairs Association.

Jessica M. Vasquez, University of Kansas, was named a Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholar Class of 2011-12. She investigate whether, and to what extent, Latino intermarriage with non-Hispanic whites facilitates the adoption of an "American" identity and integration into the mainstream for both parents and children.

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New Books

Franco Barchiesi, Ohio State University, Precarious Liberation: Workers, the State, and Contested Social Citizenship in Postapartheid South Africa (State University of New York Press, 2011).

Howard Brody, Peter Conrad, Brandeis University, Allan Horwitz, Rutgers University, and Cheryl Stults, The Risks of Prescription Drugs (Amazon Kindle, 2011).

Jerry Hage, University of Maryland, Restoring the Innovative Edge: Driving the Evolution of Science and Technology (Stanford University Press: 2011).

Joseph C. Hermanowicz, University of Georgia, (Ed.) The American Academic Profession: Transformation in Contemporary Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).

John P. Hoffmann, Brigham Young University, Delinquency Theories: Appraisals and Applications (Routledge, 2011).

Edith W. King, ASA Emerita, Teaching in an Era of Terrorism, 3rd ed. (Amazon Kindle, 2011).

Cameron Lippard, Appalachian State University, and Charles A. Gallagher, La Salle University, Being Brown in Dixie: Race, Ethnicity, and Latino Immigration in the New South (First Forum Press, 2011).

Thomas Scheff, University of California-Santa Barbara, What’s Love Got to Do with It? Emotions in Pop Songs (Paradigm Publishers, 2011).

Russell K. Schutt, University of Massachusetts-Boston and Harvard Medical School, and Stephen M. Goldfinger, SUNY Downtown Medical Center, Homelessness, Housing, and Mental Illness (Harvard University Press, 2011).

Sarah Sobieraj, Tufts University, Soundbitten: The Perils of Media-Centered Political Activism (NYU Press, 2011).

Gayle A. Sulik, Pink Ribbon Blues: How Breast Cancer Culture Undermines Women’s Health (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Rachael A. Woldoff , West Virginia University, White Flight/Black Flight: The Dynamics of Racial Change in an American Neighborhood (Cornell University Press, 2011).

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Other Organizations

The Africana Institute celebrated 10 years of services to Essex County College, the greater Newark community, and beyond on May 12, 2011. Sociologist Akil Kokayi Khalfani has severed as Director for the past five years and has lead the Institute to reach new scholarly, cultural, and social heights. The institute has a Scholar-in-Residence program that has hosted two ASA members over the past five years—Kesha Moore, Drew University, and Janice Johnson Dias, John Jay College. Those interested in urban research in Newark should apply to be a Scholar-in-Residence. Contact: Akil Kokayi Khalfani, Africana Institute, Essex County College, West Market and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Newark, NJ 07102; (973) 877-3219; www.essex.edu/ai.

The Pure Sociology Network (PSN) is an e-mail-based discussion group dedicated to those with a positive interest in the growing movement in sociology known as pure sociology, which explains human behavior with its social geometry. Created in 2006, the PSN exists to allow easy communication among and between anyone with information to share or with requests relevant to pure sociology. If you have an interest in pure sociology and would like to be included in these discussions, contact Ellis Godard, (818) 677-4050; egodard@csun.edu.

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Contact

International Review of Sociology (IRS) is a channel to spread up-to-date results of interdisciplinary research and analysis across continents and cultures. It is published three times a year in English, French, German, and Spanish, and is subject to peer-review process. The Editorial Board of the IRS aims to broaden their contacts to researchers and scholars of other countries, to enlarge the study area of the journal to a wider number of disciplines and cross-cultural approaches, and to look for new themes and research interests. The IRS is looking for help in setting editorial priorities, submitting scientific articles, research results, and self-candidature as guest-editors of the monographic section of the Review. For more information, contact Giovanni B. Sgritta, Sapienza Università di Roma, +39-06-49910645; sgritta@uniroma1.it or mariella.nocenzi@uniroma1.it.

Sociology of Consumers and Consumption. Petitions are now being accepted in support of creating a Section on the Sociology of Consumers and Consumption. Contact: Dan Cook at dtcook@camden.rutgers.edu; csrn.camden.rutgers.edu/.

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