July-August 2008 Issue • Volume 36 • Issue 6

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Announcements

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Corrections

Page 1 of the "2008 Annual Meeting Supplement," in the centerfold of the printed May/June 2008 Footnotes, provided the correct date of the ASA presidential address and awards ceremony (in the "Major Plenary Sessions" sidebar box), but it misstated the day. The correct day is Saturday, August 2, at 4:30 pm.

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Call for Papers

Publications

The Flame of Love: Theologically Informed Social Scientific Research on the Experience and Expression of Godly Love in the Pentecostal Tradition. The University of Akron and the Institute for Research on Unlimited Love announce a request for proposals for a research venture, The Flame of Love: Theologically Informed Social Scientific Research on the Experience and Expression of Godly Love in the Pentecostal Tradition. Letters of intent must be received by July 28, 2008. After expert review, the project co-directors will invite a small number of full proposals, which must be received by October 13, 2008. For more details, visit www3.uakron.edu/sociology/flameweb/rfp.html.

Gender & Society Special Issue: Heteronormativity and Sexualities. This special issue of Gender & Society seeks articles that investigate the operation and effects of heteronormativity and resistance across a variety of gendered, racialized, and classed contexts. Papers are welcome providing sociologically grounded, data-rich empirical scholarship that demonstrates how heteronormativity works in everyday lives, production of culture, and the practice of social institutions. Completed manuscripts should be submitted online to mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gendsoc and should specify in the cover letter that the paper is to be considered for the special issue. Manuscripts are due October 1, 2008. Contact: Beth Schneider at schneider@soc.ucsb.edu or Jane Ward at janew@ucr.edu.

The Journal of Applied Social Science, the official, peer-refereed journal of the Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology (AACS), is requesting submissions for future issues. We publish original research articles, essays, research reports, teaching notes, and book reviews on a wide range of topics of interest to the sociological practitioner. All submissions are processed electronically. Send as an email attachment a word-processed document (not PDF) file of the manuscript, an abstract of no more than 150 words, and a brief biographical statement. Tables and figures must be camera-ready. Submissions for the fall issue will be accepted through August 15, 2008, and for the spring issue through February 15, 2009. Submissions should be accompanied by a processing fee of $15 sent via postal mail (this fee is waived for members of AACS). Contact: Jay Weinstein, Journal of Applied Social Science, Department of Sociology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI 48197; jay.weinstein@emich.edu. For further information on journal policy, officers, bylaws, and membership application, visit www.aacsnet.org.

Race, Gender and Class Special Issue: Socializing Our Youth. The editors seek papers covering all aspects of youth socialization that utilize an intersectionality approach (work that looks at how markers of difference such as gender, race, class, and sexual orientation function simultaneously and cannot be understood in isolation) within or across disciplinary conversations. All theoretical and methodological approaches are welcome. Contact: Heather Albanesi, Race, Gender & Class, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, PO Box 7150, University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150; halbanes@uccs.edu. Manuscripts are accepted for consideration with the understanding that they are original material and are not under consideration for publication elsewhere. Submission deadline: July 1, 2008.

The Society for Terrorism Research (STR) announces a call for papers for its flagship journal, Terrorism Research. Papers that are accepted for publication will appear in both an internet and paper-bound journal. The purpose of the journal is to provide a timely, scientifically, and theoretically sound set of papers addressing terrorism from an interdisciplinary, integrative, behavioral science perspective. For more information, including submission procedures, visit www.societyforterrorismresearch.org/pages/strjournal.html. Contact: Samuel Justin Sinclair at jsincl@post.harvard.edu; www.societyforterrorismresearch.org.

Meetings

2009 Pacific Sociological Association’s 80th Annual Meeting, April 8-11, 2009, Westin Horton Plaza, San Diego, CA. Speakers are invited to present their research pertaining to: collective memory, socio-political issues pertaining to "commodity memory" such as electronic dataveillance, video surveillance; seed, sperm or DNA banking; drug technology to improve or repress memory; sociological, psychological, historical or legal issues pertaining to personal, trauma, repressed, body memory; or early or recent theoretical conceptualizations about memory and related topics. Send initial inquiries, abstracts, and contact information to Noel Packard at packardn@prodigy.net. For more information, visit www.pacificsoc.org. Deadline: September 1, 2008.

Second International Conference on Religion and Media, November 9-12, 2008, Tehran and Qom, Iran. All media researchers and scholars, representatives from diverse religious traditions, and professionals and students involved with the subjects of the conference are invited to submit a paper. For more information, visit www.religion-media.ir/.

Teachers, Teaching, and the Movies: Representations and Pedagogy in Film, Television, and New Media Multi-disciplinary Conference, March 26-28, 2009, Saint Mary’s College of California, Moraga, CA. This multi-disciplinary conference will focus on two growing areas in the fields of education and media studies: (1) The ways in which movies and television represent teachers and teaching, students and learning and (2) How film, television, and new media function as pedagogical tools in the classroom. Organizers are looking for papers that critically examine the cultural representation of teachers, students, and the educational setting, as well as papers that explore the ways that films, television, and new media open possibilities for new forms of pedagogy. Send proposals of at least 250 words and no more than 500 words by October 1, 2008. Contact: Robert Bulman, Sociology Department, Saint Mary’s College of California, 1928 St. Mary’s Road, Moraga, CA 94575; rbulman@stmarys-ca.edu.

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Awards

Patti Adler, University of Colorado, was honored with the 2008 Teacher Recognition Award at the University of Colorado-Boulder, the only faculty award chosen solely by the students. 

Paul Almeida, Texas A&M University, received a Fulbright Faculty Fellowship for his project, "Globalization, Democratization, and Civil Society in Central America." He will spend the 2008-2009 academic year as a visiting professor at the University of Costa Rica.

Suzanne Bianchi, University of Maryland-College Park, and Sally Hillsman, American Sociological Association, received the Stuart A. Rice Award for Career Achievement Award from the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

Wayne Brekhus, University of Missouri, has been awarded the University of Missouri’s William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence.

Clifton Bryant, Virginia Tech, received the 2008 Martin L. Levin Award from the Southern Sociological Society.

Noelle Chesley has received a 2008 Sloan Work-Family Career Development Grant to support her research investigating the experiences of stay-at-home fathers and their full-time employed female partners.

Jessica Davey, Marian College, received first place in the undergraduate division of the Annual Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition in Honor of Don Martindale.

Jennifer Dunn, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, and Doug Hartmann, University of Minnesota, received the Inaugural Midwest Sociological Society Early Career Scholarship Award.

Larry Griffin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, received the 2008 Distinguished Lecturer Award from the Southern Sociological Society.

Geoff Harkness, Northwestern University, received first place in the graduate division of the Annual Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition in Honor of Don Martindale.

Shirley Hill, University of Kansas, was named the winner of the Inaugural Midwest Sociological Society Distinguished Book Award for her book Black Intimacies: A Gender Perspective on Families and Relationships.

Christine Himes, Syracuse University, has been named Maxwell Professor of Sociology in recognition of her scholarly contributions and service to the University and Maxwell School.

Larry Isaac, Vanderbilt University, has been awarded a 2008 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for his research on "Elite Paramilitaries in the Gilded Age."

Dejun Kong, Washington University-St. Louis, received second place in the graduate division of the Annual Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition in Honor of Don Martindale.

William Marsiglio, University of Florida, was elected to Fellow status for the National Council on Family Relations, 2007.

HarmoniJoie Noel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, received second place in the graduate division of the Annual Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition in Honor of Don Martindale.

Harper Ida Simpson, Duke University, received recognition from the Southern Sociological Society by having her name added to the Society’s Roll of Honor.

Verta Taylor, University of California-Santa Barbara, is the 2008 recipient of the John D. McCarthy Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Scholarship of Social Movements and Collective Behavior from the Center for the Study of Social Movements and Social Change at Notre Dame University.

Charles Tilly, Columbia University, was awarded the 2008 Albert O. Hirschman Prize, which is awarded annually to scholars who have made outstanding contributions to international interdisciplinary social science research, theory, and public communication in the tradition of Albert O. Hirschman. (See obituary in May/June 2008 issue of Footnotes, p. 15)

Ashley Vancil, Beloit College, received second place in the undergraduate division of the Annual Midwest Sociological Society Student Paper Competition in Honor of Don Martindale.

Kathy Ward, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, Received the Second Annual Jane Addams Outstanding Service Award from the Midwest Sociological Society’s Women in the Profession Committee.

Gregory Weiss, Roanoke College, received the 2008 Distinguished Contributions to Teaching Award from the Southern Sociological Society.

Robert Wuthnow, Princeton University, Peter Bearman, Columbia University, and Mark Granovetter, Stanford University, have been elected members of the 2008 class of Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Michael Yaksich, University of Maryland-College Park, received the Irene B. Taeuber Graduate Student Paper Award from the District of Columbia Sociological Society.

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Meetings

July 31, 2008. 2008 Communication and Information Technologies Section of the American Sociological Association (CITASA) Pre-Conference and Graduate Student Workshop, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Theme: "Worlds of Work: Communication and Information Technologies." All sessions are open to members of CITASA, the ASA, and the general public. A detailed program, including paper abstracts, can be found at citasa.org/pre-conference.

July 31, 2008. Psychoanalysis and Society, Sheraton Hotel, Boston, MA. Last year in New York an informal group of scholars gathered to discuss relationships of Freudian psychoanalysis to sociological issues. This year the plenary speaker will be Fred Alford. There is no charge for attendance, but organizers ask participants to pre-register to reserve their spot. Contact: Lynn Chancer at lchancer@hunter.cuny.edu or Lauren Langman at Llang944@aol.com.

July 31-August 1, 2008. Sociological Imagination Group (SIG) 9th Annual Meeting, Westin Copley Place Hotel, Boston, MA. Theme: "Confronting Fundamental Social Problems." Free admission. Half of the presentations will be devoted to open discussion. Focus is not only on papers presented at this time but is also on developing a social science movement throughout the year, aimed at fulfilling what C.W. Mills called "The Promise of Sociology."

August 1-4, 2008. Sociologists for Women in Society (SWS) Summer Meeting, Boston, MA. Feminist scholarship, activism, and professional development. For more information, visit www.socwomen.org.

October 19-23, 2008. Third Global Congress of Women in Politics and Governance, Dusit Hotel, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines. Theme: "Gender and Climate Change." This conference is designed for women parliamentarians; women in decision making and governance; youth leaders and media practitioners; funding/donor agencies/organizations. Contact: Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP), 4237-4239 Tomas Claudio Street, Baclaran, Parañaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines; (632) 851-6934; fax (632) 852-2112; globalcongress2008@gmail.com; globalcongress2008@capwip.org; capwip@capwip.org; www.capwip.org or www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org.

October 23-24, 2008. Penn State’s 16th Annual Symposium on Family Issues, University Park campus. Theme: "Development of Hispanic Children in Immigrant Families: Challenges and Prospects." Sixteen scholars from major institutions will integrate perspectives from multiple social sciences and address policy implications. For more information, visit: www.pop.psu.edu/events/symposium/2008.htm. Contact: Carolyn Scott at css7@psu.edu.

November 9-12, 2008. Second International Conference on Religion and Media, Tehran and Qom, Iran. All media researchers and scholars, representatives from diverse religious traditions, and professionals and students involved with the subjects of the conference are invited to attend. For further information, visit www.religion-media.ir/.

March 26-28, 2009. Teachers, Teaching, and the Movies: Representations and Pedagogy in Film, Television, and New Media Multi-disciplinary Conference, Saint Mary’s College of California, Moraga, CA. Contact: Robert Bulman, Sociology Department, Saint Mary’s College of California, 1928 St. Mary’s Road, Moraga, CA 94575; rbulman@stmarys-ca.edu.

April 8-11, 2009. 2009 Pacific Sociological Association’s 80th Annual Meeting, Westin Horton Plaza, San Diego, CA. For more information, visit www.pacificsoc.org.

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Funding

The Open Society Institute (OSI) has recently launched a new fellowship program to support outstanding idea entrepreneurs from around the world. The Open Society Fellowship enables innovative professionals to work on projects that inspire meaningful public debate, shape public policy, as well as generate intellectual ferment within OSI. The fellowship focuses on four areas: National Security and the Open Society; Citizenship, Membership, and Marginalization; Strategies and Tools for Advocacy and Citizen Engagement; and Understanding Authoritarianism. Fellows’ projects may include books, articles, outreach for documentary films, online media, and efforts to seed new campaigns and organizations. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis and there is no deadline. To apply online, visit www.soros.org/initiatives/fellowship/focus_areas/guidelines. Contact: Bipasha Ray at osfellows@sorosny.org; www.soros.org/initiatives/fellowship.

The Princeton University Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts invites applications for three-year postdoctoral fellowships, 2009-2012, for recent PhDs (January 2006-June 2009) in humanities or social sciences. Four appointments to pursue research and teach half-time include: Open discipline (two fellowships), Humanistic Studies, and East Asian Humanities. Annual stipend: approximately $69,500. Application deadline: October 1, 2008. For details, visit www.princeton.edu/~sf.

The National Poverty Center’s Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy Postdoctoral Fellowships, 2009-2011. One- and two-year postdoctoral fellowships offered to American scholars who are members of groups that are underrepresented in the social sciences. Fellows will conduct their own research on a poverty-related topic under the direction of Sheldon Danziger of the National Poverty Center. Funds are provided by the Ford Foundation. Applicants must have completed their PhD by August 31, 2009. Preference is given to those who have received their degree after 2003. Application deadline is January 19, 2009. Contact: Program on Poverty and Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, 735 South State St., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Applications can be downloaded from fordschool.umich.edu/research/poverty/fellowship_opps.php.

Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Guide to NIH Grants. For more information, visit obssr.od.nih.gov/Content/Research/BSSR_Guide_To_Grants_at_NIH. Compiled and distributed by the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Office at the National Institutes of Health obssr.od.nih.gov/ Contact: abeles@nih.gov.

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Competitions

Fifth Worldwide Competition for Junior Sociologists. The International Sociological Association (ISA) announces the organization of the Fifth Worldwide Competition for Junior Sociologists engaged in social research. The winners will be invited to participate in the XVII World Congress of Sociology which will take place in Göteborg, Sweden, July 2010. The winning papers will be considered for publication in English in the ISA’s journal International Sociology, or in another ISA publication. Candidates must send an original paper that has not been previously published. Papers focusing on socially relevant issues are preferred. The phenomena examined may be social, economic, political, cultural or of any other kind, but their interpretation or analysis must show a sociological orientation. Empirical research papers must go beyond descriptive reporting of results to broader, analytical interpretations. Papers will be judged according to perceptiveness with which issues are treated, the quality of empirical materials presented, the consistency with which an analytic framework is used, the originality of ideas, and the clarity of style. Papers from scholars in third world countries are welcome. Papers may be written in one of the following languages: English, French, Spanish, as well as Arabic, Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, and Russian. Assessors will be appointed for each of these languages. Contact: 5th ISA Worldwide Competition for Junior Sociologists, Attention: Louis Chauvel, Department of Sociology, Sciences-Po University Paris, 27 rue Saint Guillaume, 75007 Paris, France; 33-1-44185441, fax -1-44185451; chauvel@sciences-po.fr. Deadline: April 1, 2009. For more information, visit www.isa-sociology.org/wcys/index.htm.

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In the News

Organized by Subject Area

Aging and the Life Course

Benjamin Cornwell, Edward Laumann, and Philip Schumm, all of the University of Chicago, had their research on social connectedness of older Americans included in an April 18 Associated Press article. Cornwell was quoted in the article, which was published on CNN.com on May 12 and widely elsewhere online, and in print newspapers around the country. Cornwell was also quoted in a May 14 Orlando Sentinel article about the decline of lawn bowling clubs.

Nick Danigelis, University of Vermont, as a result of his article on intracohort aging and sociopolitical attitudes in the October 2007 American Sociological Review with Melissa Hardy, Penn State University, and Steve Cutler, University of Vermont, was interviewed by Reuters, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Toronto Globe & Mail, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Wilson Quarterly, University of California-Berkeley’s Greater Good, LiveScience.com, Wisconsin Public Radio, and Vermont Public Radio, among others. 

Gordon De Jong, University of Pittsburgh, was quoted in a May 18 New York Times story about changing demographics in Pittsburgh, where deaths outnumber births.

Michael Kearl, Trinity University, was quoted in a February 27 article in the Houston Chronicle about leap year and humanity’s time obsessions. Kearl was also quoted in a May 6 Baltimore Sun article about the public’s fascination with final words of the dying, and a May 25 article in the same newspaper about how people deal with death.

Phyllis Moen, University of Minnesota, was quoted in The New York Times on April 21 in a story about conflicting perspectives on retirement and marriage roles between husbands and wives of retirement age. Moen was also quoted in an April 26 article in Canada’s National Post about women’s fertility and their careers.

Katherine Newman, Princeton University, was quoted in a May 23 Wall Street Journal column about young adults returning to live at home with their parents. Newman was one of 20 researchers who contributed to "The Price of Independence," a collection of studies published by the Russell Sage Foundation.

Yang Yang, University of Chicago, was quoted about her research on happiness and aging from the April issue of the American Sociological Review in articles by the Associated Press (April 18), Reuters (April 16) and United Press International (April 17). Yang’s research was covered by the Chicago Sun-Times (April 18), The Miami Herald (April 26), and in other news outlets around the country.

Children and Youth

American Sociological Association was mentioned during a question and answer session segment during the release of the "Trends in Infancy/Early Childhood and Middle Childhood Well-Being, 1994-2006" report broadcast on C-SPAN on April 25.

Amy Best, George Mason University, was quoted in the April 27 Press Democrat (Santa Rosa, CA) article about the rite of prom. Best was also quoted on the low-cost prom phenomenon in a May 21 Associated Press article that was published in The Boston Globe, Yahoo! News, CNN.com, MSNBC, and other media outlets around the country.

Maria Kefalas, St. Joseph’s University, was quoted about the problems faced by girls nationwide in a column from the April 23 Philadelphia Daily News about the investigation of child abuse concerns within a Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints community in Texas.

Kenneth Land, Duke University, had his research on child well-being covered in the April 24 issue of The Washington Post. Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, was also quoted in the article. The syndicated article also appeared in the Denver Post on April 24.

Annette Lareau, University of Maryland-College Park, had her book Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life cited in a May 11 Washington Post "Reading List" article about books on parenting.

Robert Putnam, Harvard University, had his research cited in a May 4 editorial in Tulsa World about social capital and youth civic engagement.

Karen Sternheimer, University of Southern California, was quoted in an April 26 Agence France-Presse (AFP) article about the phenomenon of Miley Cyrus. Sternheimer asserts that Cyrus is the latest embodiment of young female stars packaged for parents as much as for children. The article appeared on Yahoo! News.

Carl Taylor, Michigan State University, was quoted in an April 28 article in The Chicago Tribune about urban violence’s impact on children. Taylor has studied violence and children in urban communities for more than 20 years.

Julia Wrigley, City University of New York, was quoted in an April 13 article about online child care reports in The Washington Post. Wrigley has studied child care fatalities.

Collective Behavior and Social Movements

Rachel Einwohner, Purdue University, was quoted in a May 13 Associated Press article about protests and other behaviors spurred by higher gas prices. The article was published on ABCNews.com, CNN.com, and in other news outlets including The Chicago Sun-Times.

Mary Grigsby, University of Missouri, and Juliet B. Schor, Boston College, were quoted in a May 17 New York Times article about the modern simplicity movement. Grisby is the author of Buying Time and Getting By: The Voluntary Simplicity Movement. Schor is the author of The Overspent American.

Community and Urban Sociology

Ray Oldenburg, University of West Florida, had his book, The Great, Good Place, referenced in a May 16 Chicago Sun-Times article on the sense of community created on social networking website Facebook.

Greg Squires, George Washington University, was quoted in a May 16 USA Today article about cities filing lawsuits against banks over home foreclosures. The article was republished on ABCNews.com.

Communication and Information Technologies

Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern University, was quoted in a May 2 article in The Washington Post about online social networking profiles.

Mark Thomas Kennedy, University of Southern California, was quoted concerning his research on establishing credibility for emerging markets published in the February issue of the American Sociological Review in a May 13 column on BusinessWeek.com.

Lisa Slattery Rashotte, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, was quoted in a May 23 LiveScience.com article on the origins and popularity of the thumbs-up gesture. The article appeared on the AOL News website on May 23.

Richard Sennett, London School of Economics and Political Science, was the subject of a May 23 Chronicle of Higher Education article in which Sennett’s research and writing is discussed. Mark Granovetter, Stanford University, was also mentioned in the article for his research on social networks.

Crime, Law and Deviance

Todd Gitlin, Columbia University, was quoted in a May 7 Associated Press story about police infiltration into the drug culture at San Diego State University.

Jon Hussey, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was cited in an April 16 editorial in The Charlotte Observer and The Raleigh News & Observer on campus gun violence co-written by UNC Chancellor James Moeser and Duke University President Richard Brodhead. The cited research, which examined the link between child neglect and future aggression, was also featured in an April 23 article in The Washington Post.

David Jacobs, Ohio State University, had his research on death row and race included in a May 8 segment on The Tom Joyner Morning Show, airing on radio stations nationwide.

Akil Kokayi Khalfani, Essex County College, was interviewed about prisoner re-entry in New Jersey on WBAI News April 9.

Jack Levin, Northeastern University, was quoted in an April 29 ABCNews.com article about the Smiley Face Killer, and appeared on the May 1 episode of CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360 on the same topic. He discussed celebratory rioting in the May 3 Montreal Gazette and was quoted in the May 6 Wall Street Journal about the causes of the growing rate of violent crime in some cities. He was quoted in the Metrowest Daily News on May 7 about a "person of interest" being investigated in a string of prostitute slayings, and in the May 11 Wisconsin State Journal about concealing information from the public during police investigations. He appeared on a May 9 episode of TruTV’s In Session to discuss anti-Semitic hate crime in Seattle, and a May 11 program on the BBC about the Charles Manson murders.

Michael Norris, Wright State University, commented on the tenuous relationship between crime and the economy in articles from April 21 in The Columbus Dispatch, The Akron Beacon Journal, and Associated Press.

Geraint Osborne, University of Alberta, had his research on marijuana use in Canada detailed in a Canwest News Service article on May 15. The article was published in a number of Canadian newspapers.

Greg Scott, DePaul University, was quoted in an April 25 Chicago Tribune article about forecasted spikes in violence and the city’s gangs.

Sociology of Culture

Nicholas Christakis, Harvard University, and Sherry Turkle, MIT, are quoted in an April 27 article about friendship in the Facebook and MySpace era in The Washington Post.

Jean Elson, University of New Hampshire, and Steven Martin, University of Maryland-College Park, were quoted in the June issue of Women’s Health magazine in an article about modern relationships in comparison with those of previous generations.

David Grusky, Stanford University, was quoted in an April 29 Associated Press story about "Yawns" (Young and Wealthy but Normal), a subset of young people who are socially aware and interested more in charity than consumption. The article was published in USA Today on May 3 and in a number of regional newspapers around the country.

Karen Bettez Halnon, Penn State University, was quoted about the mainstream acceptance of tattoos in a May 23 article from The Economist.

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in a June 3 USA Today article about Internet dating and older singles. Schwartz also appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America on April 2 to discuss her "compatibility index" for predicting winners on the network’s Dancing with the Stars program.

Economic Sociology

Jeanne Fleming, Money magazine, had her research cited in an April 27 New York Times story about generational differences in willingness to discuss salary information.

Gary Green, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was quoted in a June 3 Associated Press story about the impact of General Motors plant closures on communities. The article was published in The Chicago Tribune, Akron Beacon Journal, The Orlando Sentinel, as well as in other media outlets around the country.

Robert Manning, Rochester Institute of Technology, was interviewed on National Public Radio’s To the Point program on May 27. He spoke about credit cards during a May 30 Marketplace report, also on NPR. Manning, the author of Credit Card Nation, was interviewed for a March 27 segment about consumer credit on ABC’s Good Morning America and appeared on FOX Morning News on March 10 and Lou Dobbs Tonight on February 23.

John Walton, University of California- Davis, was quoted in an April 7 news report from the United Nation’s Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN).

Sociology of Education

Cornelius Riordan, Providence College, was included in a May 16 article about single-sex schools in The Sacramento Bee. Riordan cited growth in single-sex education since about 1990.

Joseph Soares, Wake Forest University, was quoted in a May 27 InsideHigherEd.com article about his university’s decision to end its SAT requirement. Soares is the author of The Power of Privilege: Yale and America’s Elite College, which argues that the SAT was used to keep certain socioeconomic and minority groups out of colleges.

Environment and Technology

Nicholas Christakis, Harvard University, was quoted in an April 29 Columbia News Service article about Facebook, the social networ king website, and young people who chose to remove themselves from the site.

Dalton Conley, New York University, had his research cited in an April 24 article in Canada’s National Post about house size. Conley’s research indicates that people who live in homes where the number of rooms is fewer than the number of inhabitants suffer from increased irritability, withdrawal, weariness, and poor physical and mental health.

Riley Dunlap, Oklahoma State University, was quoted in a May 12 story in The Philadelphia Inquirer on the growth of local groups and national networks of middle- and upper-middle-class mothers promoting ecological lifestyles. He noted that this was an important extension of women’s leadership roles in local environmental justice groups within blue collar and minority communities.

Eszter Hargittai, Northwestern University, was interviewed in a question and answer column about her research on the technology skills of young adults in the May 2 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Bob Leighninger, Arizona State University, was quoted in an April 27 Associated Press story about the legacy of the New Deal. Leighninger is the author of two books on New Deal buildings. The article appeared in The Jackson Clarion-Ledger on May 5.

Rich Ling, Telenor, had his book New Tech, New Ties reviewed in the April 21 issue of The Wall Street Journal and was interviewed in a question and answer column in the April 25 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Sociology of Family

Deborah Carr, Rutgers University, had her research included as the subject of a Detroit Free Press article on May 6. Carr investigated the relationships between mothers and daughters and co-authored Making Up with Mom: Why Mothers and Daughters Disagree about Kids, Careers, and Casseroles and What to Do About It. The book was also cited in Newsweek, USA Today, The Miami Herald, and various local newspapers and radio stations.

Douglas Downey, Ohio State University, was quoted in the June 2 issue of Newsweek regarding his research on only-children.

Paula England and Elizabeth McClintock, both of Stanford University, had their research on older men and marriage profiled in a syndicated San Jose Mercury News story on May 7 that ran in newspapers across the country. The study found that the older a man is when he marries after 40, the more likely that his wife will be significantly younger.

Lingxin Hao, Johns Hopkins University, was quoted in an April 23 Baltimore Examiner article about her research on parental disciplinary action and its effects on sibling behavior.

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in a LifeWire story about women who "mother" their husbands, published on CNN.com on April 30. Schwartz also was quoted in a May 4 Los Angeles Times Magazine article about the romantic relationships of politicians.

Pamela Smock, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, was quoted in an April 15 Associated Press story about the cost of divorce and out-of-wedlock childbearing to United States taxpayers. The article appears in news outlets around the country, including TIME magazine’s website, AOL.com, and CNN.com.

Stephen Sweet, Ithaca College, was quoted in an April 16 article on TheStreet.com about the financial impact of marriage.

International Migration

Stephen Klineberg, Rice University, and Robert Sampson, Harvard University, were cited in front-page commentary in the April 28 edition of the Houston Chronicle. The article cited data from Klineberg’s "Houston Area Survey" and Sampson’s research on crime and immigration.

Mary Waters, Harvard University, was quoted in a May 18 New York Times article about the study, "Inheriting the City: The Children of Immigrants Come of Age," which looked at adult children of immigrants to the New York region. Waters co-authored the study with Philip Kasinitz, City University of New York Graduate Center; Jennifer Holdaway, Social Science Research Council; and John Mollenkopf, a political scientist.

Latino/Latina Sociology

Stephen C. Lilley, North Carolina State University, was quoted in a May 1 article about the growth of the Hispanic population in North Carolina within The News & Observer.

Enrico Marcelli, San Diego State University, had his research linking money transfers and sports clubs cited in The San Diego Union-Tribune on May 18. Marcelli found that Mexican members of sports clubs in Los Angeles were more likely to transfer money home through banks than non-members.

Medical Sociology

Sarah Burgard, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, was quoted about her research on the impact of workplace problems on sleep in news reports by HealthDay News and United Press International on April 17. The story appeared on FOXNews.com, Forbes.com, and various other online news sites.

Nicholas Christakis, Harvard University, was quoted in a May 21 Associated Press article about his research showing the impact of social networks on smoking cessation. The May 25 Washington Post, May 29 The New York Times, and other major newspapers also covered the research. Christakis was interviewed about the research in a May 23 Morning Edition segment on National Public Radio and The Wall Street Journal covered the research on May 23.

Ming Wen, University of Utah, Chris Browning, Ohio State University, and Kate Cagney, University of Chicago, had their study on neighborhood effects and physical activity profiled in The New York Times on March 25. Cagney was also interviewed by Chicago Public Radio on March 25 about the role of neighborhoods in regular exercise.

Organizations, Occupations & Work

Jennifer Glass, University of Iowa, was quoted in the Iowa City Press-Citizen in an April 23 article about pay gaps at the university.

Vincent Roscigno, Ohio State University, was quoted in an April 13 Chicago Tribune article about his research, which found that older workers are most likely to experience discrimination when they approach 50 and 60 years of age.

Julie Stewart, University of Utah, was quoted in an April 21 article in The Salt Lake Tribune about the challenges faced by female professors who want to have families.

Peace, War & Social Conflict

Andrew Lindner, Pennsylvania State University, had his research from Contexts magazine on the Iraq War media embedding program profiled in news stories posted on The Huffington Post and Editor & Publisher websites on May 14.

Kim Scipes, Purdue University North Central, had her article on the testimony of Iraqi war veterans published in the April issue of Substance and on ZNet Commentaries on the zcommunications.org website.

Political Economy of the World System

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, had his editorial urging Israel to pursue diversity published in The Guardian on April 30.

Political Sociology

Patricia Hill Collins, University of Maryland-College Park, was quoted in a June 2 Washington Post article about the Democratic presidential candidates and race and gender.

Larry Diamond, Stanford University, was cited for his catchphrase "democratic recession" in a May 27 article about democracy around the world in The Christian Science Monitor.

Peter Dreier, Occidental College, authored a May 1 Huffington Post article, "Top Clinton Aide Uses Former Right-Wing Foes to Attack Obama," which generated more than one thousand comments and was covered by MSNBC’s Countdown, TIME, Salon.com, Slate, The Politico, DailyKos, and American Prospect, among others. Dreier’s other recent articles on The Huffington Post include: "Labor’s Self-Inflicted Wounds Threaten the Progressive Movement" on April 17, "HUD Secretary Alphonso Jackson’s Resignation: A Window Into Bush Administration’s Corruption, Indifference, and Incompetence" on April 2, "The Mortgage Mess and the Economic Meltdown: What McCain (and the Rest of Us) Should Learn from the Keating Scandal" on March 25, "Does Obama Really Have a Race Problem?" on March 20, and "If McCain’s a Moderate, I’m the Easter Bunny" on February 10.

Ho-fung Hung, Indiana University-Bloomington, was interviewed and quoted in an April 16 Yahoo!Sports article concerning whether the recent unrest and suppression in Tibet would trigger an international boycott of the upcoming Beijing Olympics.

Jerome Karabel, University of California-Berkeley, authored an opinion piece in the April 15 Los Angeles Times. The column asserted that the new generation attracted to politics by Barack Obama could easily become alienated.

William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, was quoted in an article about rifts in the Democratic Party in The New York Times on April 27.

Sociology of Religion

Mark Chaves, Duke University, was quoted about the number of women pastors ordained this year by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in a May 24 article in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

William D’Antonio, The Catholic University of America, was quoted in an April 21 USA Today article about the pontiff’s personality and had his book, American Catholics Today: New Realities of Their Faith and Their Church, cited in an article in The Wall Street Journal on April 18. He was also quoted in an April 14 article in the Los Angeles Daily News about challenges faced by the Roman Catholic Church in the United States.

Dean Hoge, The Catholic University of America, was quoted in an April 14 New York Times article about the marketing of priesthood, given the decline in priests in the Roman Catholic Church. Hoge discussed his studies of recently ordained priests.

Michael Hout, University of California-Berkeley, had his research cited in a May 19 USA Today "On Religion" column about liberal Protestant denominations. Hout examined reasons for the declining membership of mainline Protestant churches.

D. Michael Lindsay, Rice University, wrote an opinion piece about evangelicals in the academy that appeared in the May 9 issue of The Chronicle Review. Lindsay’s research was also featured in the May 14 edition of U.S. News & World Report and in a May 27 Reuters article that appeared in a variety of outlets, including The Kuwait Times and The Brunei Times. Lindsay appeared on the Arab language network, Al Jazeera, to discuss religion and the U.S. presidency on April 16.

Lisa Keister, Duke University, had her research summarized in an April 2 Religion News Service article that appeared in USA Today (April 23), The Salt Lake Tribune (April 5), and The Plain Dealer (April 3), among others. Keister’s article, "Conservative Protestants and Wealth: How Religion Perpetuates Asset Poverty," was published in the American Journal of Sociology.

Paul Sullins, The Catholic University of America, was quoted in an April 25 article on the decline of Catholic education in Rochester, NY, in the city’s Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. He was also quoted in a Newsday article from April 15 about the increase in older men entering the priesthood.

Jonathan Turner, University of California-Riverside; Mark Leone, University of Maryland; and Martha Bradley, University of Utah; were quoted in an ABC News segment on April 23 about genetic issues surrounding polygamy within the West Texas Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Sociological Practice

Shelley Clark and Jody Heymann, both of McGill University, were quoted about the contributions of social science research to slowing the spread of AIDS among children in southern Africa in the spring issue of McGill Headway.

Steve Picou, University of South Alabama, and Ronald Kessler, Harvard University, were quoted in a February 28 article in the Biloxi Sun Herald about applying lessons learned from the Exxon Valdez oil spill to the Gulf Coast’s recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

Race, Gender and Class

Jason Kaufman, Harvard University, was quoted about American elites in an article from the May 25 New York Times about the presidential candidates and their efforts to escape the elitist label.

Akil Kokayi Khalfani, Essex County College, was interviewed about his book The Hidden Debate and the state of black New Jersey by Comcast Cablevision for broadcast on April 21 and 25.

Zine Magubane, Boston College, was interviewed on a June 3 National Public Radio News & Notes segment about racial tensions at the University of the Free State in South Africa.

Michael J. Rosenfeld, Stanford University, was cited in a May 7 Chicago Tribune column about Mildred and Richard Loving, the interracial couple behind the landmark Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia. The syndicated column also appeared in The Dallas Morning News (May 7), The Baltimore Sun (May 8), and other newspapers around the country.

Wendy Roth, University of British Columbia, was interviewed on April 2 about the release of ethnic diversity data from the 2006 Canadian census. Interviews appeared on CBC Radio One and CKNW radio, Global National TV, CTV, and Fairchild TV.

Darron Smith, Utah Valley State College, was quoted in a June 1 Washington Post article about race relations in Utah. Smith is the co-editor of Black and Mormon.

Rationality and Society

Thomas Beamish, University of California-Davis, was quoted in a June 3 Wall Street Journal article about the California fire season. Beamish commented about the "assumption of optimism" mindset that many California homeowners adopt to convince themselves that they will not be affected by a fire.

Sociology of Sexualities

Kathleen Bogle, LaSalle University, was quoted in an April 25 UWire article about the "hook-up culture" on college campuses. Bogle is the author of Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus. The article was published in campus newspapers including The Review (University of Delaware) and The Minaret (University of Tampa).

Becki Ross, University of British Columbia, was a featured guest on CBC Radio One on April 30. She spoke about the history of the striptease industry in Vancouver.

Martha Shockey-Eckles, Saint Louis University, and Ronald Weitzer, George Washington University, were quoted in a May 23 CQ Researcher report, "Prostitution Debate."

Sally Ward, University of New Hampshire, was quoted in an article from the May 8 edition of InsideHigherEd.com about the report Ward co-authored with other UNH researchers, "The Context of Unwanted Sexual Experiences."

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Transitions

Scott Eliason has accepted a position as Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Arizona-Tucson.

Robert Getso has accepted a position in education services with the U.S. Navy.

Kristy Holtfreter will join the faculty of the School of Criminology & Criminal Justice at Arizona State University in August of 2008.

Robyn Stryker has accepted a position as Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Arizona-Tucson.

Miles Taylor has joined the sociology faculty at Florida State University.

Catherine (Kay) Valentine, Nazareth College, has been named Professor Emerita.

Steve Vallas has accepted the position of Chair in the Sociology Department at Northeastern University.

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People

Patti Adler, University of Colorado, and Peter Adler, University of Denver, delivered the keynote opening address at the international conference on "Reflections on the Epistemologies and Methodologies of Participant Observation Research," sponsored by the Doctoral Schools of Social Sciences of the French Community of Belgium and the Ministry of Research of Belgium on May 13, 2008.

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, moderated an event on the George Washington University campus on April 14, titled "Israel at 60: Borders, Identity, and the Search for Security." The event featured Aaron David Miller and Ambassador Samuel Lewis.

Herbert Gans was honored at the Center for Urban Research and Policy, Columbia University, with a one day conference on March 13, titled "Urban Kaleidoscope: New Directions in Sociology in Honor of Herbert J. Gans."

Michael Jindra, Spring Arbor University, was quoted several times in the book Fame Junkies by Jake Halpern on the relationship between religion and popular culture.

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Members’ New Books

David C. Bell, Indiana University Purdue-University Indianapolis, Constructing Social Theory (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008).

David L. Brown and Nina Glasgow, both of Cornell University, Rural Retirement Migration (Springer, 2008).

Steven M. Buechler, Minnesota State University-Mankato, Critical Sociology (Paradigm Publishers, 2008).

Wendy Chapkis and Richard J. Webb, Dying to Get High: Marijuana as Medicine (New York University Press, 2008).

Kelly H. Chong, Deliverance and Submission: Evangelical Women and the Negotiation of Patriarchy in South Korea (Harvard University Press, 2008).

John Dombrink, University of California-Irvine, and Daniel Hillyard, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America (New York University Press, 2007).

Sharon Erickson Nepstad, University of Southern Maine, Religion and War Resistance in the Plowshares Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, Security First (Yale University Press, 2007).

Herbert J. Gans, Imagining America in 2033: How the Country Put Itself Together after Bush (University of Michigan Press, 2008).

Pyong Gap Min, City University of New York-Queens College and the Graduate Center, Ethnic Solidarity for Economic Survival: Korean Greengrocers in New York City (Russell Sage Foundation, April 2008).

Charis E. Kubrin, George Washington University, Thomas D. Stucky, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and Marvin D. Krohn, University of Florida, Researching Theories of Crime and Deviance (Oxford University Press 2008).

Kelly A. Joyce, College of William and Mary, Magnetic Appeal: MRI and the Myth of Transparency (Cornell University Press, 2008).

Jack Levin, Northeastern University, Serial Killers and Sadistic Murderers: Up Close and Personal (Prometheus Books, 2008).

Kelly Moore, Disrupting Science: Social Movements, American Scientist, and the Politics of the Military, 1945-1975 (Princeton University Press, 2008).

William Marsiglio, University of Florida, Men on a Mission: Valuing Youth Work in Our Communities (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

Susan M. Ross, Lycoming College, and Michael Musheno, San Francisco State University, Deployed: How Reservists Bear the Burden of Iraq (University of Michigan Press, 2008).

Howard Schuman, University of Michigan, Method and Meaning in Polls & Surveys (Harvard University Press, 2008).

Nelson Arnaldo Vera Hernandez, Manual de Trabajo para curso de Tecnicas de Investigacion Social (Publicaciones Puertorriqueñas, 2008).

Amanda Udis-Kessler, Colorado College, Queer Inclusion in the United Methodist Church (Routledge, 2008).

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New Publications

Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal announces the publication of its inaugural issue. Spaces for Difference: An Interdisciplinary Journal seeks to publish research that expands our understanding of issues relating to race and racism, gender and sexuality, social activism, and intersectionalities. Articles freely available at repositories.cdlib.org/ucsb_ed/spaces. Contact: spacesfordifference@sa.ucsb.edu.

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Caught in the Web

Children, Youth and Environments Special Issue on Children and Disasters. A new issue of the journal Children, Youth and Environments explores the vulnerability and resilience of children in disasters. The issue contains a unique collection of 20 papers from around the world, which examine children’s reactions to drought, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcanic eruptions, climate change, and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Some of the contributions also consider the experiences of children who live in a constant state of disaster as a result of chronic poverty, violence, or unsafe living conditions. With disaster risk on the rise worldwide, this special issue highlights the critical importance of focusing scholarly and applied attention on the special vulnerabilities of children, while also working to understand how children can contribute to disaster preparedness, response, and recovery initiatives. Children, Youth and Environments is an online journal published by the University of Colorado-Boulder. Visit www.colorado.edu/journals/cye/ for a full listing of papers and other resources that appear in the special issue. Contact: Lori Peek, Children, Youth and Environments Special Issue Guest Editor, Department of Sociology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1784; (970) 491-6777; Lori.Peek@colostate.edu; lamar.colostate.edu/~loripeek/

"Cognitive Strategies to Justify or Accommodate Torture" by Ken Pope is now available free online at kspope.com/torvic/torture-abst.php. This chapter looks at the nature and scope of torture, defines some of the most common forms of torture, and discusses the growing recognition of the ways in which the torture directed at women has tended to be minimized or overlooked. Contact: Ken Pope at ken@kenpope.com.

The Conference Board has published two reports based on a survey conducted on workforce readiness. Both of these reports are downloadable for no fee from our website. The first report, "Are They Really Ready to Work?" is available at www.conference-board.org/publications/describe.cfm?id=1494. The second report, "New Graduates’ Workforce Readiness: The Mid-Market Perspective," is available at www.conference-board.org/publications.

The Immanent Frame Blog. In just six months, The Immanent Frame, the SSRC’s blog on secularism, religion, and the public sphere, has garnered more than 100 contributions from over 70 leading thinkers. To view the blog, visit www.ssrc.org/blogs/immanent_frame/.

Understanding Cultural and Ethnic Influences on Mental Health: Data from the NSAL, NLAAS and the CPES. The NIMH Mental Health Disparities Team announces the second presentation in the Mental Health Disparities Speaker Series. Margarita Alegria, James S. Jackson, and David T. Takeuchi will present findings from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Studies. This collaborative effort, which includes the National Survey of American Lives and the National Latino and Asian American Study as well as the National Comorbidity Survey - Replication (NCS-R), provides data on the distributions, correlates, and risk factors of mental disorders among African American, Latino, and Asian American racial and ethnic subgroups. The video is available at videocast.nih.gov/Summary.asp?File=14003.

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