December 2010 Issue • Volume 38 • Issue 9

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Announcements

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Call for Papers

Publications

The International Review of Comparative Sociology invites papers for publication. The purpose of this biannual journal is to examine through a comparative lens the issues and problems confronting societies, or their distinct subpopulations, around the world with the goal of providing innovative solutions from a sociological perspective. Research papers from other related disciplines in the social sciences are also encouraged. Send manuscripts to Debarun Majumdar at dm28@txstate.edu. For more information, visit www.soci.txstate.edu/IRCS/Journal.html.

Meetings

2nd Annual Integrating Genetics & Social Science (IGSS) Conference, May 31-June 1, 2011, Boulder, CO. The goal of this conference is to showcase behavioral and molecular genetic studies that enhance demographic and social scientific inquiry or in some way integrate genetics and the social sciences. Researchers from any of the biological or social sciences are encouraged to participate. For more information, visit www.colorado.edu/ibs/CUPC/conferences/IGSS_2011/.

18th Conference on the Small City and Regional Community, April 6-7, 2011, University Center, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Theme: "Environmental Sustainability and Economic Development: Problems & Prospects." This interdisciplinary and multi-level conference presented by the Center for the Small City and the Wisconsin Institute for Sustainable Technology is soliciting papers, roundtables, demonstrations, and other presentations related to environmental sustainability in the small city and town. Proposals from academic researchers, applied professionals, government employees, as well as nonprofit and private sector leaders are encouraged. Deadline: February 1, 2011. Contact: Robert P. Wolensky, Center for the Small City, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI 54481; (715) 346-2708; rwolensk@uwsp.edu; or Ed Miller, Center for the Small City, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI 54481; (715) 346-3130; emiller@uwsp.edu.

29th Annual Southeastern Undergraduate Sociology Symposium (SEUSS), February 25-26, 2011, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA. Theme: "Complex Inequalities: The Need for Pragmatism in Research and Education." Topics in any area of sociology are welcome. Students are given an opportunity to develop important professional skills and establish social networks with students and faculty at other southeastern schools. Those students who submit full papers will also be eligible for an Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research. Deadline: January 21, 2011. For more information, visit www.sociology.emory.edu/SEUSS/.

Eastern Community College Social Science Association (ECCSSA) 37th Annual Conference, March 31-April 2, 2011, Erie Community College, City Campus, Erie, PA. Theme: "The National and Global Impacts of Economic Collapse: Perspectives from the Social Sciences." This conference will give professionals in many fields, the opportunity to address our responsibilities and roles in our current positions. ECCSSA is calling for dialogue about the particular transitions and challenges faced in the current economic climate by higher education institutions and the communities they serve. Urgent focus also is requested for models and proposals relative to the conveyance of knowledge and information on human preparedness, essential skills development for survival, and the major transformations that will likely occur over the next decade. Student submission of papers and other presentations including posters, paper and digital portfolios, websites, and models are encouraged. Student projects may be developed independently, in conjunction with a class assignment, or under instructor supervision. Deadline: December 15, 2010. For more information, visit www.eccssa.org.

Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) 61st Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2011. Theme: "Service Sociology." SSSP is an interdisciplinary community of scholars, practitioners, advocates, and students interested in the application of critical, scientific, and humanistic perspectives to the study of vital social problems. If you are involved at scholarship or action in pursuit of a just society nationally or internationally, you belong in the SSSP meeting. You will meet others engaged in research to find the causes and consequences of social problems, as well as others seeking to apply existing scholarship to the formulation of social policies. Deadline: January 31, 2011. Contact: mccormack_karen@wheatonma.edu or sssp@utk.edu; www.sssp1.org.

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Meetings

February 4-5, 2011. The Science and Democracy World Forum (SDWF), Dakar. Theme: "On The Road To Dakar..." The Science and Democracy World Forum (SDWF) is an initiative launched in 2007 as an answer to the lack of dialogue between scientific institutions and social actors on science and society issues at a global level. For more information, visit www.sdwf-fmsd.org/spip.php?page=sommaire&lang=en.

February 25-26, 2011. 29th Annual Southeastern Undergraduate Sociology Symposium (SEUSS), Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA. Theme: "Complex Inequalities: The Need for Pragmatism in Research and Education." For more information, visit www.sociology.emory.edu/SEUSS/.

March 24-27, 2011. Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) Annual Meeting, St Louis, MO, Theme: "The Dynamics of Inequality." Contact: Mary Zimmerman and Pooya Naderi at mss2011@ku.edu; www.theMSS.org.

March 31-April 2, 2011. Eastern Community College Social Science Association (ECCSSA) 2011-37th Annual Conference, Erie Community College, City Campus. Theme: "The National and Global Impacts of Economic Collapse: Perspectives from the Social Sciences." For more information, visit www.eccssa.org.

April 6-7, 2011. 18th Conference on the Small City and Regional Community, University Center, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Theme: "Environmental Sustainability and Economic Development: Problems & Prospects." Contact: Robert P. Wolensky, Center for the Small City, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI 54481; (715) 346-2708; rwolensk@uwsp.edu; or Ed Miller, Center for the Small City, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI 54481; (715) 346-3130; emiller@uwsp.edu.

April 12-16, 2011. Association of American Geographers (AAG) 2011 Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA. The AAG Annual Meeting is an interdisciplinary forum open to anyone with an interest in geography and related disciplines. A scientific and educational society, AAG is a growing worldwide network of leading scholars, researchers, professionals, and students. AAG facilitates interdisciplinary networking and collaboration through annual meetings, international workshops, specialty conferences, publications, and research programs. For more information, visit www.aag.org.

April 28-30, 2011. Elites Take Over the City (18th-21st Centuries): What Can Research Do About It? Transdisciplinary Symposium, Brussels. This symposium aims to confront empirical research, its work methods and ethical commitments, when it takes on the study of elites in the city. In French and English. Contact: Giulietta.Laki@ulb.ac.be (+32 (0)2.650.49.27); web1.ulb.ac.be/arc/elites/EN_ARC_call.pdf.

May 19-20, 2011. 1st Global Conference on Transparency Research, Rutgers University-Newark. The purpose of the conference is to bring together scholars from a wide range of fields who study issues of governmental transparency. Contact: Jyldyz Kasymova at transparency.conference@gmail.com; spaa.newark.rutgers.edu/home/conferences/1stgctr.html.

May 31-June 1, 2011. 2nd Annual Integrating Genetics & Social Science (IGSS) Conference, Boulder, CO. The goal of this conference is to showcase behavioral and molecular genetic studies that enhance demographic and social scientific inquiry or in some way integrate genetics and the social sciences. For more information, visit www.colorado.edu/ibs/CUPC/conferences/IGSS_2011/.

June 16-19, 2011. Fifth International Conference on Charlotte Perkins Gilman, University of Montana-Missoula. Theme: "Gilman Goes West." Contact: gilmanconference@umontana.edu; (406) 289-0683; www.cas.umt.edu/gilman/.

August 12-14, 2011. Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) 61st Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL. Theme: "Service Sociology." Contact: mccormack_karen@wheatonma.edu or sssp@utk.edu; www.sssp1.org.

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Funding

The Advertising Educational Foundation’s Visiting Professor Program (VPP) is a two-week fellowship for professors teaching liberal arts, advertising, marketing, and communications. Preference is given to professors with little or no industry experience. Through the VPP, professors are exposed to the day-to-day operations of an advertising agency, or marketing or media company. Additionally, the VPP provides a forum for the exchange of ideas between academia and industry. The program is offered only to professors teaching in the United States. The host companies pay housing and per diem. Professors pay travel and out-of-pocket expenses. Deadline: January 31. Contact: Sharon Hudson, 220 East 42nd Street, Suite 3300, New York, NY 10017; (212) 986-8060; fax (212) 986-8061; www.aef.com.

The American Research Center in Sofia (ARCS), Bulgaria, offers three programs with accompanying fellowships for the academic year 2011-12: a fall term program (September-November 2011) focusing on the history and archaeology of Bulgaria and neighboring countries, from prehistory to the present day; a spring term program (February-April 2012) focusing on the history of religion in Bulgaria and neighboring countries; and a nine-month program (September 2011-May 2012), which incorporates both fall and spring term programs. The programs combine a formal academic curriculum with independent research. ARCS lectures and seminars; organizes related study trips; facilitates opportunities for taking Bulgarian and other Balkan language classes; and provides logistical support and access to local libraries, museums, and other educational institutions. Contact: Denver Graninger, American Research Center in Sofia, 75 Vasil Petleshkov St., Sofia 1510, Bulgaria; (+359 2) 947 9498; fax (+359 2) 840 1962; graninger.arcs@gmail.com; www.einaudi.cornell.edu/arcs/.

The Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation seeks to expand and improve evidence-based scientific knowledge on the relationship between cultural values, economic development, and the quality of governance. This is a call for proposals for social science research projects that contribute to this generic purpose. Deadline: January 5, 2011. For more information, visit www.ffms.pt/_docs/candidaturas-para-estudo-en-objectivos-setembro-2010-a.pdf.

The Institute for Legal Studies of the University of Wisconsin Law School will appoint a post-doctoral fellow for the 2011-12 academic year. Applications are invited from scholars who are in the early (pre-tenure) stage of their career or whose careers have been interrupted or delayed. Eligibility is limited to humanities or social science scholars who work in the law and society tradition. Advanced ABD graduate students may apply, but the PhD must be completed before beginning the fellowship. The stipend will be $25,000, plus a research allowance of $5,000 and benefits that include health insurance. At the Institute, the Fellow will be able to devote most of his or her time to research and writing with a critical audience to support that work. Fellows are expected in Madison, WI, to organize and lead a colloquium for graduate students, and to participate in the intellectual life of the Institute. For more information, visit law.wisc.edu/ils/lawandsocietyfellowship.html.

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Dissertation Fellowship support advanced doctoral candidates in a variety of fields, including education and the social sciences. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation will award two $25,000 fellowships in 2011 with plans to expand in the coming years. The dissertation fellowships were created to advance understanding of the factors and contexts that help low-income students to overcome personal adversity and challenging socioeconomic circumstances to excel academically. The purpose is to inform programs and interventions that will help more low-income students identified as high achieving in their primary and secondary school years to sustain their achievement levels through college and beyond. Graduate study may be in a diverse range of academic disciplines. Deadline: February 4, 2011. For more information, visit www.jkcf.org/scholarships/
graduate-scholarships/jack-kent-cooke-dissertation-fellowship-award/
.

The Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies invites suitable candidates to apply for up to four postdoctoral fellowships and one Central and East European postdoctoral fellowship in economic sociology and political economy. Applicants must hold a PhD degree in political science, sociology, organization studies, or related fields. Degrees must be received by June 2011. For more information, visit www.mpifg.de/forschung/postdoc_program_en.asp.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) Early Independence Award Program. The NIH Common Fund announces the highly selective NIH Director’s Early Independence Award Program to provide a mechanism for exceptional, early career scientists who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents to omit traditional post-doctoral training and move into independent academic positions at U.S. institutions directly upon completion of their graduate degrees (PhD, MD, or equivalent). The NIH expects to issue 10 awards through this program in fall 2011. Early Independence Awards are targeted to exceptional junior investigators with the intellect, scientific creativity, drive, and maturity to flourish independently without the need for traditional post-doctoral training. Early Independence Award projects will receive up to $250,000 in direct costs each year for up to five years. Junior scientists may identify a host institution and contact them directly to negotiate a position. Alternatively, institutions may actively recruit exceptional junior scientists to apply for these positions. Letters of Intent due: December 21. Deadline: January 21, 2011. Contact: earlyindependence@mail.nih.gov; commonfund.nih.gov/earlyindependence.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program supports highly qualified individuals who propose to undertake broad studies of America’s most challenging policy issues in health and health care. Grants of up to $335,000 each are awarded to educational and other nonprofit institutions to support investigators from a variety of disciplines for innovative research projects that have national policy relevance. Applications must be submitted by an educational institution or nonprofit organization that is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) located in the United States or its territories, with which the proposed investigator is affiliated. We welcome applications from investigators in the health, social and behavioral sciences, as well as other fields. Deadline: January 19, 2011. Contact: (848) 932-3817; depdir@ifh.rutgers.edu; www.investigatorawards.org.

Rutgers University’s School of Management and Labor Relations. Fellowships for the study of employee stock ownership, profit sharing, broad-based stock options, and broadened ownership of capital in the corporation/society. Fifteen $25,000, $12,500, or $5,000 fellowships will be offered by Rutgers University’s School of Management and Labor Relations to doctoral candidates, recent PhD graduates, and scholars in the social sciences. Fellows may be in residence at their own university or visit Rutgers. Deadline: January 31, 2011. Contact: Joseph Blasi at beysterfellowships@smlr.rutgers.edu; www.smlr.rutgers.edu/BeysterKelsoSmileyRutgersFellowships.pdf.

The Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP) is recruiting applications for the 2011 Racial/Ethnic Minority Graduate Scholarship. Persons identified as either Black/African American, Hispanic/ Latino, Asian/Asian-American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, or American Indian or Alaska Native accepted into an accredited doctoral program in any one of the social or behavioral sciences are invited to apply for the $12,000 Racial/Ethnic Minority Graduate Scholarship. Deadline: February 1, 2011. All applicants must be a current member and a citizen or permanent resident of the United States when applying. Contact: Michelle A. Harris at michelle.harris@nau.edu; www.sssp1.org.

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Competitions

The Allan Schnaiberg Outstanding Publication Award from the ASA Section on Environment, Technology and Society. This award is given for noteworthy publications in the field of environmental sociology. This year the committee will consider single articles of special noteworthiness in the field of environmental sociology published within the period between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Members of the section are encouraged to submit nominations. Self-nominations are welcome. Deadline: April 1, 2011. Send three copies of the work along with a nomination letter to Lori Hunter at Lori.Hunter@colorado.edu.

The Marvin E. Olsen Study Paper Award Competition from the ASA Section on Environment, Technology and Society. The Marvin E. Olsen Student Paper Award recognizes outstanding papers presented by graduate students at the ASA Annual Meeting. Recipients will receive a modest monetary award to help defray expenses associated with attending the meeting. Nominees are limited to graduate students who are presenting at the Annual Meeting. Members, including potential recipients, are encouraged to submit nominations. Deadline: April 1, 2011. Contact: Lori Hunter at Lori.Hunter@colorado.edu.

The Midwest Sociological Society’s 2011 Student Paper Competition is open to all students who are members of MSS. Graduate and undergraduate papers are judged in separate divisions with prizes in each division. Deadline: January 8, 2011. For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

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In the News

Richard Alba and Philip Kasinitz, both of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, were quoted in an October 18 am New York article about mixed race marriages in New York City.

Chardie Baird, Kansas State University, was quoted and John Reynolds, Florida State University, was mentioned in an October 6 UPI article about their study in the American Sociological Review, which found that there is no harm in encouraging all students to pursue college.

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, Duke University, and Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, were quoted in an October 20 New York Times article centered around race-related comments Sharron Angle, the Republican candidate for Senate in Nevada, made during her eventually unsuccessful campaign.

Christopher Browning, Ohio State University, and Joanne Savage, American University, were quoted in an October 17 Columbus Dispatch article about crime in mixed-use neighborhoods.

Katherine K. Chen, City College of New York and the Graduate Center-CUNY, was quoted in an October 20 Los Angeles Times article about Burning Man, an annual arts-and-fire festival.

Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University, Rose Kreider, U.S. Census Bureau, Wendy Manning, Bowling Green State University, Mark Regnerus, University of Texas-Austin, and Pamela Smock, University of Michigan, were quoted in an October 6 Newsweek.com article, titled "Does ‘Living in Sin’ Still Lead to Divorce?"

Coye Cheshire, University of California-Berkeley, and Zeynep Tufekci, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, were quoted in an October 17 New York Times article about online social networking and how it compares to people’s offline social lives.

Margaret M. Chin, Hunter College and Graduate Center-CUNY, was quoted in an October 8 NPR article and was interviewed on NPR’s "All Things Considered" about Asian American long-term unemployment.

Dalton Conley, New York University, wrote an October 24 article for The Chronicle of Higher Education that looks at the 1970s and several books written about the decade. The article mentions Andrew Cherlin, John Hopkins University, and William Julius Wilson, Harvard University.

Jennifer Cross, Colorado State University, was quoted in an October 1 Coloradoan article on her study about energy usage at local high schools.

John Dale, George Mason University, was quoted in a November 4 Bangkok Post/Agence France Presse article about the significance of general elections in Burma (Myanmar) for U.S. foreign policy toward Burma.

Mathieu Deflem, University of South Carolina-Columbia, was quoted in October 29 New York Times and MTV.com articles and a November 2 BBC article about a course he is going to teach called "Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame."

Kevin Dougherty, Baylor University, was quoted and Christopher P. Scheitle, Pennsylvania State University, was mentioned in an October 4 post on The Journal News blog, "Blogging Religiously," about their study, which found that American churches generally remain segregated. The study was also the subject of an October 4 post on the Orlando Sentinel "The Religion World" blog, an October 6 post on CNN.com’s "Belief Blog," and an October 8 post on The Washington Post "Under God" blog.

Francesco Duina, Bates College, was quoted in an October 9 Sun Journal article about America’s obsession with winning, which is the subject of his new book.

Morten Ender, West Point, the United States Military Academy, was quoted in an October 12 USA Today article, "Americans Seek New Ways to Contribute to War Efforts." The story features a disconnected cadre of Americans—many with no military connections—who have created novel ways to raise funds, bring awareness, or show support to the war efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq or directly assist soldiers, veterans, or military families.

Amitai Etzioni, George Washington University, wrote an October 4 column for CNN.com, titled "Are Americans Ready for the New Normal?"

Scott L. Feld, Purdue University, was mentioned and Jeremy Brooke Straughn, Purdue University, was quoted in an October 23 Lafayette-West Lafayette Journal & Courier article about their study, which found that the diversity of religious beliefs in the United States is increasing.

Gary Fine, Northwestern University, was quoted in an October 8 Chicago Tribune column, titled "Don’t Be Home for Christmas."

Frank Furedi, University of Kent, was quoted in an October 5 Reuters article about how British parents are becoming more relaxed when it comes to drinking, drugs, and sexuality.

Mark Granovetter, Stanford University, Doug McAdam, Stanford University, and Aldon D. Morris, Northwestern University, were mentioned in an October 4 New Yorker article about social activism and social media. Granovetter and McAdam were mentioned in an October 19 TheAtlantic.com column written in response to The New Yorker story.

Andrew Greeley and Tom Smith, both of the National Opinion Research Center, were quoted in an October 20 Chicago Tribune article about Greeley’s new study on the faith of Chicago Catholics. Greeley and his study were also the subject of an October 21 NBCChicago.com article.

Jennifer Johnson-Hanks, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted in a November Contra Costa Times article about how she and her husband left Berkeley for the University of Texas-Austin only to return to the university. The article also appeared in the Mercury News on November 2.

Shamus Rahman Khan, Columbia University, Michèle Lamont, Harvard University, Michael Lindsay, Rice University, and Sudhir Venkatesh, Columbia University, were quoted in an October 16 New York Times article titled, "Scrutinizing the Elite, Whether They Like It or Not."

Peter J. Kivisto, Augustana College, was quoted in an October 15 Inside Higher Ed article, which explores changes his college is making in the face of the economic downturn.

Michèle Lamont, Harvard University, Douglas Massey, Princeton University, Robert Sampson, Harvard University, Mario Luis Small, University of Chicago, and William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, were quoted in an October 18 New York Times article on the culture of poverty. The American Sociological Association, Kathryn Edin, Harvard University, and Maria Kefalas, St. Joseph’s University, were mentioned in the article. The New York Times article was the subject of an October 18 post on the Atlantic Wire.

Jerry L. Lembcke, College of the Holy Cross, was quoted in an October 13 Worcester Telegram & Gazette article about his new book, about the anti-war actress Jane Fonda.

Harry Levine, Queens College, City University of New York, was quoted in an October 23 New York Times column about marijuana arrests.

Donald MacKenzie, University of Edinburgh, was quoted and Charles Perrow, Yale University, was mentioned in an October 22 Forbes.com article about the financial markets.

Michael Macy, Cornell University, was interviewed on the public radio program "Innovation Trail" on October 12 for a segment on the controversy surrounding the construction of wind turbines in central New York. Macy was invited to discuss how his research on opinion dynamics and polarization might shed light on the sources and possible resolution of this controversy.

Kyriakos Markides, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas, was quoted in an October 16 Wall Street Journal article regarding new CDC data that supports his decades-long longitudinal study on Hispanic aging.

Douglas Massey, Princeton University, was mentioned in an October 4 Reuters article about his study in the American Sociological Review, which found that the foreclosure crisis had significant racial dimensions. The article appeared in media outlets including FOXBusiness.com on October 4 and the New York Daily News on October 6. The study was also the subject of CBSNews.com and Newsweek.com articles on October 4 and October 16, respectively. Additionally, Massey and Gregory D. Squires, The George Washington University, co-authored a November 1 Huffington Post column, "Segregation: The Invisible Elephant in the Foreclosure Debate."

Omar M. McRoberts, University of Chicago, wrote an October 21 column for CNN.com, titled "FDR’s Lessons for Obama on Power of the Black Church."

Shannon M. Monnat, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was interviewed on KXNT News Radio on September 29 about the U.S. Census Bureau’s new poverty report and the economic well-being of Nevada residents.

Ted Mouw, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was quoted in an October 19 News & Observer article about the opening of a new U.S. Census Bureau facility.

Zachary Neal, Michigan State University, was interviewed by Talk Lansing Radio on August 31, Michigan NPR Radio on September 3, and CBS Interactive’s smartplanet.com on September 21 about his work on the importance of intercity networks for urban economies. He also wrote a September 8 column for newgeography.com on this topic.

Anthony Paik, University of Iowa, was quoted in an October 31 Washington Post article about his new study, which suggests that delaying sex leads to more satisfying relationships.

C.J. Pascoe, Colorado College, was quoted in an October 2 NPR article and was interviewed on NPR’s "All Things Considered" about public humiliation and its connection to new technology such as the Internet.

Becky Pettit, University of Washington, was interviewed on NPR’s "Tell Me More" on October 18 about the long-term affects of incarceration.

Julie Phillips, Rutgers University, was quoted and Ellen Idler, Emory University, was mentioned in an October 4 CNN.com article, about the rising suicide rates for middle-aged Americans.

Tony Pogorelc, Catholic University of America, was interviewed and took questions from the radio audience of "The Drew Mariani Show" on Relevant Radio on September 9. The topic of the show was the controversy surrounding the Florida minister’s threat to burn copies of the Quran on 9/11.

Jack Nusan Porter was interviewed October 6 by Channel 7 of Boston and the Boston Herald regarding the quadruple shootings in Mattapan (Boston). He also appeared on the Tom Sheff Show of NewTV, Newton Cable TV, on October 7 where he discussed why there has been a recent increase in homicides and other delinquent acts in the wealthy suburb of Newton, MA.

Andrea Press, University of Virginia, was quoted in an October 4 CNN.com article titled, "In a wired world, children unable to escape cyberbullying."

Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University, was mentioned in an October 10 New York Times article about his new book American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us. He was also interviewed in an October 29 Chicago Tribune article about his book and co-authored an October 17 column in the Los Angeles Times titled, "Walking Away from Church."

James B. Rule, Center for the Study of Law and Society, University of California-Berkeley, was mentioned in an October 4 post on the New York Times blog "Bucks," which explored how to stop rogue automatic bill payments.

Sharon Sassler, Cornell University, Christine Whelan, University of Pittsburgh, Bradford Wilcox, University of Virginia, were quoted in an October 7 CNN.com article, titled "College-educated More Likely to Marry, Study Says."

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in an October 4 MyNorthwest.com article about a new survey on Americans’ sexual behavior. Quotes for the article came from an October 4 interview on KIRO Radio’s Dave Ross Show.

Andrés Villarreal, University of Texas-Austin, was quoted in an October 6 UPI article about his study in the American Sociological Review, which found that skin color is linked to social inequality in contemporary Mexico.

William Julius Wilson, Harvard University, was mentioned in an October 1 Huffington Post article, about whether Wilson should be teaching a class based on the television show The Wire.

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Awards

Anisi Daniels-Smith and Jessica Leveto received the first Lewis-Benson Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching from the Department of Sociology at Kent State University. The award is named after Jerry M. Lewis and Denzel Benson, both recipients of the Kent State University Alumni Association’s Distinguished Teaching in 1983 and 1998, respectively.

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Transitions

Scott Fitzgerald, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, was promoted to Associate Professor of Sociology.

Rosemary Hopcroft, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, was promoted to Professor of Sociology.

Stephanie Moller, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, was promoted to Associate Professor of Sociology.

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People

Howard Aldrich, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, participated in an October 4 White House Women’s Entrepreneurship Conference in Washington, DC.

Andy Chen, Princeton University, and Camilo A. Romero, University of California-Berkeley, were welcomed into the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans Class of 2010.

Mary Jo Deegan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, was invited to deliver the first honored Jane Addams Lecture on Social Entrepreneurship on November 18, 2010, at a conference sponsored by the University of Uppsala and the Nobel Museum in Sweden. Deegan’s topic will be "Jane Addams, Her Neighbors, and the Hull-House School of Sociology: On Race, Class, Gender, and Peace, 1889-1935."

Jill Quadagno, Florida State University, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, on of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Joachim J. Savelsberg, University of Minnesota, received funding from the National Science Foundation, Law and Social Science Program. He also received a Collaborative Residential Fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center.

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New Books

Ron Arons, WANTED! U.S. Criminal Records (Criminal Research Press, 2010).

Mohammed Bamyeh, University of Pittsburgh, Anarchy as Order: The History and Future of Civic Humanity (Roman & Littlefield, 2010).

Steven J. Gold, Michigan State University, The Store in the Hood: A Century of Ethnic Business and Conflict (Rowman & Littlefield, 2010).

J. David Knottnerus, Oklahoma State University, Ritual as a Missing Link: Sociology, Structural Ritualization Theory and Research (Paradigm Publishers, 2010).

Jack Nusan Porter, Happy Days Revisited: Growing Up Jewish in Ike’s America (The Spencer Press/Lightening Source, 2010).

Lisiunia A. Romanienko, Technology University of Graz Austria, Body Piercing and Identity: A Comparative Perspective-New York, New Orleans, and Wroclaw (Palgrave MacMillan, 2011).

Joachim J. Savelsberg, University of Minnesota, Crime and Human Rights: Criminology of Genocide and Atrocities (SAGE, 2010).

Kim Scipes, Purdue University North Central, AFL-CIO’s Secret War against Developing Country Workers: Solidarity or Sabotage? (Lexington Books, 2010).

Neil J. Smelser, University of California-Berkeley, The Faces of Terrorism: Social and Psychological Dimensions (Princeton University Press, 2010).

Alberto Testa, Brunel University, and Gary Armstrong, Football, Fascism and Fandom: The UltraS of Italian Football (A&C Black Publishers, 2010).

Monica K. Varner, Rogers State University, and J. David Knottnerus, Oklahoma State University, American Golf and the Development of Civility: Rituals of Etiquette in the World of Golf (LAP Lambert Academic Publishing, 2010).

Viviana A. Zelizer, Princeton University, Economic Lives: How Culture Shapes the Economy (Princeton University Press, 2010).

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Other Organizations

The Midwest Sociological Society (MSS) seeks an individual with a distinguished scholarly record and editorial experience to be the next editor of The Sociological Quarterly (TSQ). Since 1960, the journal’s contributors, peer-reviewers, advisory editors, and readers have made it one of the leading generalist journals in the field. Editing TSQ is a unique, rewarding professional responsibility that brings visibility and distinction to a department and university. The editor solicits, reviews, and makes decisions about all manuscript submissions. The editorial office employs a web-based submission and peer review system, ScholarOne Manuscripts. The new editor will be expected to open an editorial office by March 1, 2012, and will edit volumes published in 2013 through 2016. The MSS provides generous support to the editorial office. The review process begins February 1, 2011. Finalists should plan to be interviewed during the MSS Annual Meeting, March 24-27, 2011, in St. Louis. Contact MSS at (608)787-8551; MidwestSS@centurytel.net; www.TheMSS.org.

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Summer Programs

Hurst Summer Institute in Legal History at Wisconsin. June 2011. The Hurst Summer Institute in Legal History is a biennial event sponsored by the Institute for Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin Law School in conjunction with the American Society for Legal History (ASLH). The fellows travel to Madison for two weeks in June to participate in daily seminars, meet other legal historians, and analyze and discuss each others work. The purpose of the Hurst Summer Institute is to advance the approach to legal scholarship fostered by J. Willard Hurst in his teaching, mentoring, and scholarship. The institute develops teaching skills by deepening the understanding of legal history and developing methods for incorporating it into the law school and undergraduate history curriculum. It provides junior faculty a unique opportunity to work closely over an extended period of time with distinguished senior faculty and thus continue the tradition of excellence in research, teaching, and mentoring others. Deadline: January 1, 2011. For more information, visit law.wisc.edu/ils/hurst_institute.htm.

Summer 2011 International Faculty Development Seminars. Themes and locations for the summer of 2011 International Faculty Development Seminars: Contemporary Senegal through Literature and the Arts, Landscapes and Culture: Human Geography in East Africa (Tanzania & Kenya), The Environment, Conservation and Industry: A Fragile Coexistence (Australia), Ruin and Revival: History, Modern Memory, and Identity (Germany & Poland), Truth and Reconciliation: Ongoing Conflict Resolution in Northern Ireland, Russia: Window to the West or Gateway to the East? (Russia & Tatarstan), Global Energy Issues: Promises and Threats (Sweden), Lessons in Sustainability (Costa Rica & Nicaragua), and Salvador da Bahia: Identity, Race, and Culture in the Afro-Brazilian Heartland (Brazil). For more information about the above seminars, visit www.ciee.org/IFDS/index.html. Funding assistance is available for faculty seminars. The Ping Faculty Development Fellowship awards in the amount of $1,000-1,500 are available for 10-15 International Faculty Development Seminar participants per year. Contact: Teri Coviello at tcoviello@ciee.org, or Kate Shalvoy at kshalvoy@ciee.org.

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