December 2008 Issue • Volume 36 • Issue 9

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Announcements

Related Links:

Call for Papers:

Publications

Journal for the Study of Radicalism (JSR) announces a call for articles and reviews on the topic of countercultures, including the hippie movement and its antecedents, communalism, artistic countercultural forms, psychological theory and the origins of the counterculture, antinomianism, "free love" and radical views of sexuality, and entheogens, psychedelics, or hallucinogens. JSR accepts articles on global topics and is interested in publishing articles and reviews on a wide range of related subjects and themes. While each issue of the journal has a thematic focus, we also publish articles and book reviews not specifically dedicated to the theme. Submissions should be 20-30 pages in length and conform to the Chicago Manual of Style. Include a one-paragraph abstract. Contact: jsr@msu.edu; www.radicalismjournal.net; www.msupress.msu.edu/journals/jsr. Deadline: March 1, 2009.

Nature and Culture, a journal exploring the relationships of human activity with the natural world, invites submissions for a special issue on the viability of adaptive technologies in an era of global environmental change. Contributions covering alternate energy sources that address the viability of different energy systems are encouraged. Papers that focus on the issue of the sustainability of alternate energy systems are also welcome. Completed manuscripts are due June 1, 2009, via email and should be formatted in accordance with Nature and Culture guidelines. Contact: Melanie Heyde, Nature and Culture, Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany; 49 (341) 235 1746; fax: 49 (341) 235 1836; nature.culture@ufz.de; www.berghahnbooks.com/journals/nc.

Social Thought and Research (STAR) is an annual publication edited by graduate students at the University of Kansas. The journal seeks to publish current issues in sociological studies as well as interdisciplinary research. This year, the journal invites papers that explore the themes of crime, punishment, and inequality. Submissions that focus on the relationship between economic inequality and incarceration, as well as other topic areas are also welcome. Deadline: May 1, 2008. Contact: starjournal@ku.edu; web.ku.edu/~starjrnl/index.html.

Meetings

103rd Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians (OAH), April 7-10, 2010, Washington, DC. Theme: "American Culture, American Democracy." The program committee seeks a wide-ranging program that will highlight the culture and cultures of the United States and how those have shaped the practice of American democracy. We look for proposals that cover the full chronological sweep of the American past, from pre-Columbian years to the 21st century, and the rich thematic diversity that has come to characterize contemporary American history writing and teaching. The program aims to include those teaching at universities, colleges, and community colleges, as well as independent scholars. The call for papers and a link to the proposal system is available at www.oah.org/meetings/2010. Deadline: February 15, 2009.

Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Global Awareness Society International, May 21-24, 2009, Washington, DC. Papers from all disciplines are invited for presentation. The central focus of the conference will address how globalization impacts various peoples and systems of the world. Globalization is broadly defined to include an array of issues that incorporate a global, international, or cross-cultural component. Contact: George Agbango, Department of Political Science, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA 17815; gagbango@bloomu.edu. Put GASI in the subject line. Deadline: March 3, 2009. For more information, visit orgs.bloomu.edu/gasi.

Fifth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, May 20-23, 2009, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign. Theme: "Advancing Human Rights through Qualitative Research." The 2009 Congress will offer scholars the opportunity to form coalitions and engage in debate and dialogue on how qualitative research can be used to bridge gaps in cultural and linguistic understandings. Contributors are invited to experiment with new methodologies, and new presentation formats. For more information, visit www.icqi.org.

North American Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit, Mobilizing Knowledge: Housing is HIV Prevention and Care, June 3-5, 2009, Double Tree Hotel Crystal City, Washington, DC. Theme: "Examining the Evidence: The Impact of Housing on HIV Prevention and Care." The Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit series is an interdisciplinary, interactive forum for the presentation of research findings on the relationship of housing status and HIV prevention and care, coupled with dialogue on public policy implications and strategies among researchers, policy makers, and providers and consumers of HIV housing and services. The conveners invite abstracts presenting the results of scientific research, program evaluation, community-based interventions, and public policy strategies. Both research and policy abstracts are encouraged, and abstracts may be submitted for oral or poster presentations. Abstracts are due January 15, 2009. View the call for abstracts at www.nationalaidshousing.org/PDF/CFA.pdf. Contact: nahc@nationalaidshousing.org.

Science & Technology in Society: An International, Interdisciplinary, Graduate Student Conference, March 28-29, 2009, AAAS Headquarters, Washington, DC. The Conference of Science & Technology in Society provides a professional and interactive venue for graduate students from Science & Technology Policy (STP), Science & Technology Studies (STS), and related fields.The organizing committee’s primary goal is to create a forum that encourages intellectual exchange between STP and STS by assembling panels around similar themes. The agenda will emphasize international perspectives of science and technology. Submit abstracts and contact information (with affiliation) via email to stabstract@gmail.com by December 29, 2008. Information concerning area lodging and registration will be posted on the conference website. A small number of travel grants will be available on a competitive basis. For more information, visit www.stglobal.org.

Sixth Annual Social Theory Forum, April 8-9, 2009, University of Massachusetts-Boston. Theme: "Integration, Globalization and Racialization: Theories and Perspectives on Immigration." This year’s conference will explore the relationship between immigration and the changing cultural, political, and social landscape of the global north. The conference organizers seek papers that use thick descriptions and rigorous analyses of the dynamics of immigration, especially to re-examine some of the guiding assumptions and core propositions of modern social theory. The conference will feature both invited and submitted papers and presentations. Send a one-page abstract or proposals as email attachment (MS Word Format) to Jorge.Capetillo@umb.edu or Glenn.Jacobs@umb.edu. Deadline: January 15, 2009. Contact: Social Theory Forum, Department of Sociology, University of Massachusetts-Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125.

Thirty-First Annual North American Labor History Conference, October 22-24, 2009, Wayne State University. Theme: "Knowledge, Work, and Class." The program committee encourages comparative and interdisciplinary scholarship from a range of national and international contexts, the integration of public historians and community and labor activists into conference sessions, and the use of differing session formats. It encourages sessions that address the theme from perspectives of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Proposals due: March 23, 2009. Contact: Janine Lanza, North American Labor History Conference, Department of History, 3094 Faculty Administration Building, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202; (313) 577-2525; fax: (313) 577-6987; nalhc@wayne.edu.

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Meetings

February 5-8, 2009. Sociologists for Women in Society 2009 Winter Meeting, Savannah, GA. Theme: "Reflecting Back and Moving Forward: Milestone and Mountains on the Road to Equality." For more information, visit www.socwomen.org.

March 6-7, 2009. Critical Demography Association Annual Conference, State University of New York-Albany. Theme: "A Safeplace for Innovative Ideas on the Study of Population." Critical Demographers will share their work and accomplishments, as well as have the opportunity to network. For more information, visit  www.albany.edu/~hdh/criticaldemography/index.html.

March 28-29, 2009. Science & Technology in Society, AAAS Headquarters, Washington, DC. The conference provides a professional and interactive venue for graduate students from Science & Technology Policy (STP), Science & Technology Studies (STS), and related fields. Contact: stabstract@gmail.com; www.stglobal.org.

April 2-5, 2009. Midwest Sociological Society Annual Meeting, Des Moines Marriott Downtown, Des Moines, IA. Theme: "Teaching Sociological Scholarship." For more information, visit www.TheMSS.org.

April 8-9, 2009. Sixth Annual Social Theory Forum, University of Massachusetts-Boston. Theme: "Integration, Globalization and Racialization: Theories and Perspectives on Immigration." This year’s conference will explore the relationship between immigration and the changing cultural, political, and social landscape of the global North. Contact: Social Theory Forum, Department of Sociology, University of Massachusetts-Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125.

April 24, 2009. Women in Politics-Global Perspectives Conference, Ohio State University. Themes include women and democracy, national security, and conflict, women’s global organizing, and women in politics gaining access, changing institutions. For more information, visit www.sociology.osu.edu/wip/index.php.

May 20-23, 2009. Fifth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign. Theme: "Advancing Human Rights Through Qualitative Research." For more information, visit www.icqi.org.

May 21-24, 2009. Global Awareness Society International’s 18th International Interdisciplinary Conference, Grand Hyatt Hotel, Washington, DC. Theme: "Globalization: The Challenge of Prosperity and Inequality." Contact: Ransford Palmer at RPalmer805@aol.com or George Agbango at gagbango@bloomu.edu. For more information, visit orgs.bloomu.edu/gasi.

May 21-24, 2009. Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Global Awareness Society International, Washington, DC. The central focus of the conference will address how globalization impacts various peoples and systems of the world. Globalization is broadly defined to include an array of issues that incorporate a global, international, or cross-cultural component. Contact: George Agbango, Department of Political Science, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA 17815; gagbango@bloomu.edu; orgs.bloomu.edu/gasi.

June 3-5, 2009. North American Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit, Mobilizing Knowledge: Housing is HIV Prevention and Care, Double Tree Hotel Crystal City, Washington, DC. Theme: "Examining the Evidence: The Impact of Housing on HIV Prevention and Care." The Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit series is for the presentation of research findings on the relationship of housing status and HIV prevention and care, coupled with dialogue on public policy implications and strategies. Contact: nahc@nationalaidshousing.org; www.nationalaidshousing.org/PDF/CFA.pdf.

October 22-24, 2009. 31st Annual North American Labor History Conference, Wayne State University. Theme: "Knowledge, Work, and Class." Contact: Janine Lanza, Coordinator, North American Labor History Conference, Department of History, 3094 Faculty Administration Building, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202; (313) 577-2525; fax: 313 577-6987; nalhc@wayne.edu.

November 12-15, 2009. 1989: The Fall of the Berlin Wall, Twenty Years After, Laguna Beach, CA. It is time to ask the big questions: Just what have been the repercussions--politically, socially, culturally and economically of the post-1989 transformations? And why has there been such divergence in outcomes among the affected countries? Contact: Nina Bandelj at nbandelj@uci.edu or Dorothy Solinger at dorjsol@uci.eduwww.democ.uci.edu/.

April 7-10, 2010. 103rd Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians, Washington, DC. Theme: "American Culture, American Democracy." For more information, visit www.oah.org/meetings/2010.

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Funding

2009 NIH Director’s New Innovator Awards. The New Innovator Awards are part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research and supports exceptionally creative scientists who take highly innovative, potentially high-impact approaches to major challenges in biomedical or behavioral research. The awards provide up to $1.5 million in direct costs and are for early career investigators who have not received an NIH regular research (R01) or similar NIH grant. NIH expects to make up to 24 New Innovator Awards. The New Innovator Award competition proposal submission period is from December 15, 2008, to January 15, 2009. For more information, visit nihroadmap.nih.gov/newinnovator.

NIH Transformative R01 Program. The NIH’s new Transformative R01 Program (T-R01s) will allow highly creative, "out-of-the-box" projects to be supported. The T-R01 Program represents a High Risk/High Reward Demonstration Project in which novel approaches to peer review and program management are to be piloted. The application submission period is from December 29, 2008, to January 29, 2009. For more information, visit nihroadmap.nih.gov/T-R01.

Samuel DuBois Cook Postdoctoral Fellowship. The Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in the Social Sciences (REGSS), an affiliate of the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University, announces the establishment of the Samuel DuBois Cook Postdoctoral Fellowship. Scholars interested in the study of race, ethnicity, and the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity, are invited to apply for this one-year fellowship. Postdoctoral fellows teach one course during the year, present their research at one of the center’s monthly research colloquia, and devote the rest of their time to research and writing. For more information, visit portal.ssri.duke.edu/NewsandEvents/Lists/News/DispForm.aspx?ID=72.

Sloan Work-Family Career Development Grant Program. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announces the availability of Work-Family Career Development Grants. This program will award grants to up to five junior faculty members who are investigating important work and family questions. The level of support is $45,000 per grant recipient. More information about these grants, including eligibility requirements, nomination deadlines, and application procedures, can be obtained by visiting: www.sloan.org/assets/files/christensen/2009workfamilycareergrants_callforproposals.pdf. Contact: work-family-grant@sas.upenn.edu.

STPP Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. The Science, Technology, and Public Policy (STPP) Program in the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan seeks to fill one postdoctoral fellow position (for two years in residence) starting fall 2009. STPP Fellows are expected to perform research in some aspect of science and technology policy, teach courses in science and technology policy, help to organize a seminar series, and work with faculty to develop the STPP program. Applicants should be recent recipients of the doctoral degree with demonstrated interest in science and technology policy. Awardees will be expected to be in residence in Ann Arbor, MI, for the time of their award and be an active colleague within UM. Applications due in January. Contact: STPP Fellow Search, Attn: Bonnie Roberts, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan, 735 S. State Street, 4204 Weill Hall, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-3091; (734) 615-6942; fischerb@umich.edu; stpp.fordschool.umich.edu .

The Teagle Foundation announces two new Requests for Proposals that invite four-year colleges and universities, as well as other institutions concerned with undergraduate liberal education, to develop projects that have the potential to advance student learning. Awards for Systematic Improvement in Student Learning: www.teagle.org/grantmaking/rfp/2008_rfp_systematic%20improvement.pdf. Fresh Thinking Working Groups on "Big Questions and the Disciplines:" www.teagle.org/grantmaking/rfp/2008_bqdisciplines.pdf.

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Competitions

2009 Illinois Qualitative Dissertation Award. The 2009 award, co-sponsored with Sage Publications, will be made at the 5th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, May 20-23, 2009. For more information, visit: www.c4qi.org/award.html. Submissions should be sent to: Illinois Qualitative Dissertation Award Committee, The Center for Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Gregory Hall, Room 103 (mc-462), 810 South Wright St, Urbana , IL 61801. Deadline: February 1, 2009.

MSS Student Paper Competition. The Midwest Sociological Society announces its 47th Annual Student Paper Competition in honor of Don Martindale. The competition is open to all student members of the Midwest Sociological Society. Graduate and undergraduate papers are judged in separate divisions with up to three prizes in each division. Prizes consist of a waiver of the MSS Annual Meeting registration fee plus $100, $150, or $250 to be used to defray the costs of attending the meeting. Contact: Jean Van De Linder at (405)744-4613; jean.van_delinder@okstate.edu; www.themss.org/STUDENTpage.html. Deadline: January 8, 2009.

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In the News

Aging and the Life Course

Corey Keyes, Emory University, was quoted in an article about longevity from Prevention magazine, available on MSN’s "Health and Fitness" website on October 30.

Brian Powell, Indiana University, was cited in an October 3 syndicated LifeWhile article about baby boomers and parenting. The article appeared on the websites of radio stations nationwide. Powell conducted research that found that, on average, older parents provide more resources for their children.

Virginia Rutter, Framingham State College, was quoted in a news brief about online dating and seniors in the October 6 Indianapolis Star.

Kay Trimberger, Sonoma State University, was quoted in a New York Times News Service article about the social connectedness of single senior women. The article was published in The San Diego Union-Tribune on October 5.

Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco

Stephen Bahr and John Hoffman, both of Brigham Young University, were quoted in an October 2 Salt Lake Tribune article regarding their research about drug use by religious youth.

H. Wesley Perkins, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, was quoted in the August 11 Daily Progress about a study he co-authored demonstrating marked reductions in negative consequences due to drinking following a social norms intervention. His study was also reported in the Chronicle of Higher Education news blog the same day.

Children and Youth

Mark Regnerus, University of Texas-Austin, Peter Bearman, Columbia University, and Hannah Brückner, Yale University, were cited in the November 3 issue of The New Yorker in an article about evangelical teens and pregnancy.

Amy Schalet, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, authored an opinion piece about teenagers and contraception for the October 9 Washington Post.

Karen Sternheimer, University of Southern California, was quoted in an October 28 article in The Press-Enterprise about the case of a missing teenager.

Community and Urban Sociology

Derek S. Hyra, George Washington University, was quoted in an October 16 New York Times article about displacement in Upper Manhattan. 

Communication and Information Technologies

Andrew Jones, California State University-Fresno, was quoted in a November 1 Fresno Bee article about accessibility and the digital television transition.

Eva Kahana, Case Western Reserve University, was quoted in a September 23 Cleveland Plain-Dealer article about technology and the elderly.

Eric Klinenberg, New York University, was quoted in an October 10 New York Times article about increased news consumption.

Barry Wellman, University of Toronto, had his research on technology and family relationships described within The Washington Post on October 20. He was a co-author of a report published by the Pew Internet and American Life Project that found that the Internet and cell phones may strengthen families.

Crime, Law, and Deviance

Amie Nielsen, University of Miami, was quoted in an October 30 Miami Herald article about increasing property crime in south Florida.

Harland Prechel, Texas A&M University, was a guest on the community radio program Biased Transmission on KEOS-FM in Bryan, TX, on September 3 to discuss his National Science Foundation-funded research, "The Organizational and Political-legal Causes of Corporate Financial Malfeasance."

Mary Romero, Arizona State University, was quoted in the October 5 Arizona Republic in an article about racial profiling. She suggested that Latinos may be targeted as sheriff’s deputies search for illegal immigrants.

Richard Rosenfeld, University of Missouri-St. Louis, was quoted in an October 9 New York Times article about the link between crime and the economy. He was cited on the same topic in an October 21 Reuters article.

Greg Scott, DePaul University, was featured in an October 16 Chicago Public Radio segment about his research on prostitution and drug dealing in Chicago.

Chris Uggen, University of Minnesota, was quoted in an October 16 post about outlaws on The New York Times’ "Freakonomics" blog.

Sociology of Culture

Kathleen Blee, University of Pittsburgh, was quoted in a November 2 article about rural skinheads in The Jackson Sun.

David Grazian, University of Pennsylvania, was quoted in an October 23 New York Times article about the continuing popularity of television shows featuring the escapades of the wealthy, despite the economic downturn.

Laura Hansen, University of Massachusetts-Boston, was quoted in an October 19 Boston Globe article about the disappearing stigma of begging.

Anthony Synnott, Concordia University, was quoted in The New York Times in an October 29 article about increasing interest in the study of ugliness as compared to beauty.

Economic Sociology

Joanne Belknap, University of Colorado-Boulder, was quoted in The Colorado Springs Gazette in an October 31 article about the impact of financial woes on domestic violence rates.

Daniel Bell, Harvard University, was cited in an October 21 Washington Post editorial for his book The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism.

Dalton Conley, New York University, was quoted in an October 18 New York Times article about the social effects of a bad economy.

Dan Cornfield, Vanderbilt University, was quoted in the October 4 Tennesean in an article about poverty.

Wendy Espeland, Northwestern University, authored an opinion piece about the $700 billion financial bailout, published in The Boston Globe on October 9.

David Grusky, Stanford University, was quoted in The Globe and Mail on October 28 in a commentary about today’s economy and materialism.

Christopher Jencks, Harvard University, authored an essay on "Reinventing the American Dream" in the October 17 issue of The Chronicle Review. The essay was adapted from a talk he gave at the 2008 ASA Annual Meeting.

Kevin Leicht, University of Iowa, was quoted in an October 9 LiveScience.com story about the middle class and the American dream. The syndicated article also appeared on the U.S. News & World Report website on October 9.

Sociology of Education

Debra Guckenheimer, Sarah Fenstermaker, and John Mohr, all of University of California-Santa Barbara, and Joseph Castro, University of California-San Francisco, had their research on the attitudes of academic administrators regarding the role of faculty in shared governance featured in an August 4 Inside Higher Ed article and a September editorial in New York Academe.

Mark Oromaner, New York City, was quoted in the August 3 edition of the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle concerning ethical issues facing the Board of Trustees of Monroe Community College.   

Emotions

Yang Yang, University of Chicago, was quoted about her happiness research in "Triage," a blog from The Chicago Tribune. The October 21 post cited Yang’s article in the April American Sociological Review.

Sociology of Family

John P. Robinson, University of Maryland, and Edward O. Laumann, University of Chicago, were quoted in an October 27 post on The New York Times’ "Well" blog regarding infidelity and the scientific study of marriage.

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted about leaving a long-term marriage in an October 21 Toronto Sun article on Madonna’s divorce.

Lisa Strohschein, University of Alberta, was quoted in an October 20 USA Today article regarding research about the strain that children with ADHD place on marriages. Her study did not find higher divorce rates for parents of these children.

International Migration

Douglas Massey, Princeton University, was cited in an October 22 syndicated editorial about immigration that appeared in newspapers nationwide.

Medical Sociology

Troy Duster, New York University, authored an article in the October 10 Chronicle of Higher Education regarding the ethical considerations of brain imaging studies.

Lori Hunter, University of Colorado-Boulder, was interviewed by Earth & Sky, an international radio science program, on October 28 regarding her research on HIV/AIDS and the natural environment in rural South Africa.

Paul Starr, Princeton University, had his book, The Social Transformation of American Medicine, named as one of the five best books on the history of medicine in the October 4 Wall Street Journal.

Organizations, Occupations & Work

Mary Benin, Arizona State University, was quoted about mothers working part time in an October 20 Arizona Republic article.

Elizabeth Bernstein, Barnard College, offered a sociological vantage point on prostitution in the CNBC special, Dirty Money: The Business of High End Prostitution, which aired on November 11. Bernstein is the author of Temporarily Yours: Intimacy, Authenticity, and the Commerce of Sex.

Shelley Correll, Stanford University, was quoted in an October 30 Forbes.com story about working mothers. She discussed the efforts that European countries have taken to increase the workforce participation of mothers.

Alexandra Kalev, University of Arizona, and Frank Dobbin, Harvard University, were cited in an October 5 Virginian-Pilot article for their research on diversity training programs in the workplace. Dobbin was quoted in an article on the same topic within the November issue of T + D magazine.

Kristen Schilt, University of Chicago, was cited in an October 3 Time magazine article about the gender pay gap. Schilt co-authored research about the experiences of transgender people in the labor force. The Associated Press covered the research in an October 19 article that appeared in The Seattle Post-Intelligencer and other newspapers.

Mady Segal, University of Maryland, was quoted in an October 16 National Public Radio segment about the unemployment rates of military spouses.

Political Sociology

Wayne Baker, University of Michigan, was cited in October 26 and November 2 Washington Post articles about voter values. Baker is author of America’s Crisis of Values: Reality and Perception.

David Brady, Duke University, was quoted in an October 23 Associated Press article about religious social activists raising poverty as an election issue. The article was published by USA Today and a number of other media outlets.

Monte Bute, Metropolitan State University, had his op-ed "Can Obama Lose?" about the candidate’s strategy to not use lawn signs published in the October 8 Star Tribune.

Bruce Carruthers, Northwestern University, was quoted in an October 20 Chicago Tribune article discussing the McCain campaign’s claims that Obama is a socialist.

Jonathan Cordero, California Lutheran University, was quoted about the strain on relationships that election seasons can create in a November 2 Ventura County Star article.

Sarah Cowan, University of California-Berkeley, had an Op-Chart article in the November 2 New York Times that highlighted her findings on voter influence in the electoral college. The piece shows a map of the United States with each state sized according to its influence in the presidential election.

Chandler Davidson, Rice University, was quoted in the November/December issue of Mother Jones in an article about vote suppression.

Peter Dreier, Occidental College, has been a regular columnist and commentator during the election season for The Huffington Post and The Nation magazine, writing about political, economic, and social issues.  In The Nation, Dreier discussed the Republican Party’s orchestrated attack on community organizers (September 5), the growing number of elected officials with backgrounds in community organizing (September 8), the dramatic increase in student and youth groups working to register and turnout out young voters (September 15), and the controversy over a plan by the Michigan GOP to keep people who lost their homes to foreclosure from voting (September 22). Dreier’s columns in The Huffington Post addressed Bush’s financial bailout plan (September 23), the backlash against Palin’s attack on community organizing (September 26), McCain’s voting record on veteran’s issues (September 28), the mortgage mess (September 30), a grassroots campaign about housing issues in Los Angeles (October 3), and the Kingston Trio and the Red Scare (October 13).

Reynolds Farley, University of Michigan, was quoted in a November 2 Los Angeles Times article about questions that the presidential election will decide. Farley commented on changing attitudes surrounding race.

Gary Alan Fine, Northwestern University, was quoted in an October 18 Chicago Tribune article about the public’s interest in election politics.

Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College, was quoted in an article about politics and the black church in the November 1 Cleveland Plain-Dealer.

Neil Gross, University of British Columbia, and Solon Simmons, George Mason University, were cited in an October 15 opinion column in USA Today for their research on the political views of university professors.

Carol Joffe, University of California-Davis, commented on the sociological factors associated with an abortion-related proposition in California in an October 27 San Diego Union-Tribune article.

D. Michael Lindsay, Rice University, commented on the political activity of American evangelicals in 2008 for several media outlets including USA Today (August 29), Reuters (August 30), the French daily La Tribune (September 12), The Christian Science Monitor (October 8), and Voice of America (August 29).  He was also quoted about the presidential election and "culture war" in a November 2 Reuters article.

Jeff Manza, New York University, was quoted in an October 14 South Florida Sun Sentinel article about the eligibility of felons to vote in Florida.

Mark Oromaner, New York City, had his letter concerning similarities between candidate Sarah Palin and candidate George W. Bush published in the September 11 edition of AM-New York.

Andrew Perrin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was quoted about race in the presidential election in a November 3 article in The Fayetteville Observer. The article Perrin wrote for the fall Contexts magazine was the subject of a November 3 LiveScience.com article that was published on the Yahoo! News and U.S. News & World Report websites. Perrin was also quoted in an October 30 CNN.com article about the potentially confusing nature of some complicated ballots.

Michael Rosenfeld, Stanford University, was cited in an October 19 article about race and the 2008 presidential election in The News Journal.

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in an October 29 Miami Herald story about navigating political viewpoints in relationships.

Tom Steiger, Indiana State University, was quoted in an October 31 article about the battleground state of Indiana on ABCNews.com.

Robb Willer, University of California-Berkeley, was quoted in an October 28 San Francisco Chronicle article about last-minute political smears in the 2008 presidential election.

Sociology of Religion

Christopher Bader, Baylor University, was quoted in an October 12 National Public Radio broadcast regarding his research on American religious attitudes.

Roger Finke, Pennsylvania State University, was quoted in an October 12 Arizona Republic article about the growing popularity of Latin Mass.

Samuel C. Heilman, Queens College and CUNY-Graduate Center, was quoted in an article in The News & Observer on October 5 regarding a free DVD insert about "Radical Islam’s War Against the West." He is an authority on Orthodox Jewish movements.

D. Michael Lindsay, Rice University, was cited in an October 8 Austin American-Statesman article in the "Of Sacred and Secular" blog. Lindsay offered analysis of a poll of religious youth about their political views, and was quoted in The Dallas Morning News on October 8 on the same topic. Lindsay also was quoted in an October 11 Dallas Morning News article about Rev. Joel Osteen’s decision to charge money for "worship events" in cities around the country. He was quoted in an October 18 Associated Press story about the lack of evangelical representation in journalism. The story appeared on CBSNews.com, in Editor & Publisher, and in a number of newspapers across the country.

Jen’nan Ghazal Read, Duke University, authored an opinion piece in the October 3 News & Observer regarding a free DVD insert in the newspaper that contained anti-Muslim propaganda. She was quoted about misperceptions of Muslim Americans in an October 23 post on The Chicago Tribune’s "The Seeker" blog. Her article on American Muslims in the fall Contexts magazine was reported by LiveScience.com on October 30.

Christian Smith, University of Notre Dame, was cited in an October 4 Deseret News article regarding his research on teens and religion.

Rodney Stark, Baylor University, was cited in an October 28 Vancouver Sun article about science and religion.

Race, Gender, and Class

Abby L. Ferber, University of Colorado-Denver, authored an opinion piece about racism posted on The Huffington Post on October 30.

Rachel E. Luft, University of New Orleans, was quoted in an October 18 Times-Picayune article about the shifting racial landscape in New Orleans.

Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Mary Campbell, University of Iowa, was cited in an October 9 News-Press article for her work on a study of affirmative action and stigma. Campbell was a co-author of the study, published in the December California Law Review.

Eric Grodsky, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and Demetra Kalogrides, University of California-Davis, were cited in an October 9 Inside Higher Ed article about their research on college admissions policies and affirmative action. The research was published in the American Journal of Education.

Orlando Patterson, Harvard University, authored an article about "The New Mainstream" in the November 10 issue of Newsweek. The article examined what a victory for Barack Obama would mean for the problem of race in America.

Ruben Rumbaut, University of California-Irvine, and Alejandros Portes, Princeton University, were cited for their research on the children of immigrants in an article posted on MSNBC.com on October 14. Portes was interviewed in an October 14 segment on NBC’s Nightly News about increasing diversity in America.

Carl Taylor, Michigan State University, was quoted in an October 8 ESPN.com article about the O.J. Simpson verdict. Taylor said that the verdict represented closure for "traditional white America," but not for African Americans.

Sociology of Sex and Gender

Dalton Conley, New York University, was quoted in an October 17 Newsweek.com article about men’s participation in voting.

Barbara Risman, University of Illinois-Chicago, was quoted in an October 8 Reuters article about Sarah Palin’s appearance and whether it would influence votes in the presidential race.

Sociology of Sexualities

Kathleen Bogle, LaSalle University, was cited for her book, Hooking Up, in an October 7 Newsweek article about the "pornification" of America.

Sociological Practice and Public Sociology

Terry Besser, Iowa State University, was quoted in an October 3 Des Moines Register article about the potential for recovery in a local town struck by floods. Besser has studied the effects of natural disasters in Iowa.

James Alan Fox and Jack Levin, both of Northeastern University, were quoted in an October 16 Boston Globe article about the "Immoral Boston" tour that they created. The article referenced that the tour was given during ASA’s 2008 Annual Meeting in Boston.

Teaching and Learning

Chad M. Hanson, Casper College, authored a commentary in the October 31 edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education about the benefits of a community college career.

Andrew Perrin, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, was cited in The News & Observer’s "Campus Notes" blog on October 10 for the blogging project he incorporated into his first-year seminar on "Citizenship and Society in the United States."

Visual Sociology

Karen Cerulo, Rutgers University, was featured in the November 15 edition of the online magazine Glimpse. She was interviewed regarding the ways in which colors and shapes influence the impact of flags and other symbols.

Pepper Schwartz, University of Washington, was quoted in the October 5 USA Weekend regarding the importance of image in dating.

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Awards

Bette Dickerson, American University, received the Alice Paul Award for commitment to women’s equality by the Women and Politics Institute and the Women’s Initiative of American University.

Jon Hendricks, Oregon State University, has been recognized with the Robert W. Kleemeier society-wide research award by the Gerontological Society.

Shirley A. Jackson, Southern Connecticut State University, received an honorable mention from the CSA Sociological Abstracts Discovery Prize. She was also awarded the New England Sociological Association’s Apple Award.

Susan S. Silbey, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, received a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship Award from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. She will use the funds to research and write about trust and surveillance in the cultures of science.

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Transitions

Monica J. Casper was appointed Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Women’s Studies and Director of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies at Arizona State University’s New College.

Billie Gastic has joined the Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs at the McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies at University of Massachusetts-Boston as an Assistant Professor.

Christopher M. Hill was appointed Director of the Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource Center by the Oklahoma Sentencing Commission.

Ibtisam Ibrahim was appointed Assistant Professor of Sociology and Director of the Minor Program in Arab Studies at American University.

Natalia Ruiz-Junco and Chenyang Xiao have both been appointed Assistant Professors of Sociology at American University.

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People

Sally T. Hillsman, American Sociological Association, was elected Chair of the Consortium of Social Science Associations’ (COSSA) Executive Committee.

Gary Sandefur, University of Wisconsin-Madison, was elected to the Consortium of Social Science Associations’ (COSSA) Board.

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New Books

Daniel Béland, University of Calgary, and Brian Gran, Case Western Reserve University, Eds., Public and Private Social Policy: Health and Pension Policies in a New Era (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008).

Becky Brasfield, University of Illinois, Oppression: Cause, Composition, SolutionPublication Information (VDM, 2008).

Monique Diderich, Shawnee State University, Sibling Relationships in Step-Families: A Sociological Study (Mellen Press, 2008).

Amin Ghaziani, Princeton University, The Dividends of Dissent: How Conflict and Culture Work in Lesbian and Gay Marches on Washington (University of Chicago Press, 2008).

Rubén Hernández-León, University of California-Los Angeles, Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to the United States (University of California Press, 2008).

Derek S. Hyra, George Washington University, The New Urban Renewal: The Economic Transformation of Harlem and Bronzeville (University of Chicago Press, 2008).

Linda Kalof, Amy Dan, and Thomas Dietz, all of Michigan State University, Essentials of Social Research (Open University Press/ McGraw-Hill, 2008).

Gerardo Marti, Davidson College, Hollywood Faith: Holiness, Prosperity, and Ambition in a Los Angeles Church (Rutgers University Press, 2008).

Stjepan G. Mestrovic, Texas A&M University, Rules of Engagement? A Social Anatomy of an American War Crime--Operation Iron Triangle, Iraq (Algora, 2008).

Richard Quinney Field Notes (Borderland Books/University of Wisconsin Press, 2008).

T.P. Schwartz-Barcott, Social Research Services, After the Disaster: Re-Creating Community and Well-Being at Buffalo Creek Since the Notorious Coal-Mining Disaster in 1972 (Cambria Press, 2008).

Robert B. Smith, Social Structural Research, Cumulative Social Inquiry: Transforming Novelty into Innovation (Guilford Press,2008).

Barbara Sutton, SUNY-Albany, Sandra Morgen, and Julie Novkov, Eds., Security Disarmed: Critical Perspectives on Gender, Race, and Militarization (Rutgers University Press, 2008).

Jose Zuniga, International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care, Alan Whiteside, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Amin Ghaziani, Princeton University, and John G. Bartlett, Johns Hopkins University, A Decade of HAART: The Development and Global Impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (Oxford University Press, 2008).

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Other Organizations

Human Organization, Editor-In-Chief. The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) announces a search for a new Editor-in-Chief of Human Organization, a journal that has been recognized as a leading scientific publication in applied anthropology since its founding in 1941. It is published four times annually and is directed toward interdisciplinary as well as anthropological audiences. The term for the new editor will begin January 1, 2011. The initial term of service will be three years. The term is renewable for one additional three-year period. The Editor-in-Chief also serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the Society for Applied Anthropology. Candidates for the position should be able to secure release time (where possible) and other institutional support to supplement SfAA resources, constitute an Editorial Board, promote and cultivate the journal, and offer editorial expertise and direction. Provide the Publications Committee early on with a letter of intent, which can help initiate discussion and provide potential applicants with necessary information. Deadline: September 15, 2009. Contact: Society for Applied Anthropology, HO Editor Search, PO Box 2436, Oklahoma City, OK 73101-2436; nesch@uky.edu. We encourage interested individuals to contact current editors David Griffith at griffithd@ecu.edu and Jeff Johnson at johnsonje@ecu.edu.

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Caught in the Web

Memorial Conference Papers and Tilly Fund for Social Science History. The presentations and papers of the Hirschman Prize Ceremony and memorial conference in honor of Charles Tilly are now available online at www.ssrc.org/hirschman/event/2008. At the memorial conference, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the Social Science History Association (SSHA) announced the creation of the Charles Tilly and Louise Tilly Fund for Social Science History www.ssrc.org/donate/tillyfund. Shortly after Tilly’s death, the SSRC launched a web site of "Tributes to Charles Tilly" featuring essays by several of his close colleagues and former students and providing the opportunity to submit tributes. The site includes a page with "Annotated Links to Charles Tilly Resources" providing extensive information about Charles Tilly’s life and work. Furthermore, the SSRC published an interactive version of Tilly’s new article "Memorials to Credit & Blame." Visit the site at www.ssrc.org/essays/tilly.

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New Programs

Animal Studies: Social Science and Humanities Perspectives, Michigan State University. The graduate specialization in Animal Studies: Social Science & Humanities Perspectives is designed for doctoral and master’s students to explore the historical and social dimensions of the human-animal relationship from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students gain basic knowledge in the relationships between humans and other animals, develop an understanding of how humans and other animals are linked together in a vulnerable biosphere, examine the legal, philosophical and historical perspectives on the relationship between humans and other animals, and apply issues of the human-animal relationship to their home disciplines. This specialization is administered by the College of Social Science, with the Department of Sociology as the primary administrative unit. Students from any discipline are welcome. Contact: Linda Kalof, Department of Sociology, lkalof@msu.eduwww.animalstudies.msu.edu.

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Summer Programs

Crime and Justice Summer Research Institute: Broadening Perspectives & Participation. July 6-24, 2009, Ohio State University. Faculty pursuing tenure and career success in research intensive institutions, academics transitioning from teaching to research institutions, and faculty members carrying out research in teaching contexts will be interested in this Summer Research Institute. The institute is designed to promote successful research projects and careers among faculty from underrepresented groups working in areas of crime and criminal justice. Each participant will complete an ongoing project in preparation for journal submission or agency funding review. Participants will gain information that will serve as a tool-kit tailored to successful navigation of the academic setting. The institute will culminate in a research symposium where participants present their completed research before a scholarly audience. Applications must be postmarked by February 6, 2009. Download the application form at cjrc.osu.edu/rdcj-n/summerinstitute. Contact: cjrcinstitute@osu.edu.

Project L/EARN. This program is an intensive, hands-on summer research training internship for undergraduate students from previously under-represented groups in graduate schools and health research. Ten interns are selected annually from colleges and universities nationwide to participate in a ten-week residential internship at Rutgers University. During the summer, they obtain research skills and "hands-on" experience in health research through a combination of coursework on statistics, research methods, research writing, ethics and health topics, and an individual research project under the guidance of a distinguished faculty mentor at Rutgers University’s Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. Faculty mentors represent a diverse array of disciplines, including health economics, medical sociology, medical anthropology, public health, social work, nursing, and health psychology; all head vigorous research programs. Each intern will be matched with a mentor whose work is most closely aligned with his or her particular interests, skills, and background. The internships provide students with a $3,800 stipend, tuition, and room and board. Students also receive three academic credits for the program. Application deadline: February 17, 2009. Contact: Jane Miller or Diane Davis at plearn-info@ifh.rutgers.edu; www.ihhcpar.rutgers.edu/projectlearn.

Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program. The Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware welcomes applications for the Fifth Annual Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program. Ten students from a variety of disciplines will be selected to participate in a nine-week program providing hands-on research training and mentoring in social science aspects of disasters. A stipend and all transportation and lodging expenses are included. Students entering their junior or senior year in fall 2009 and students traditionally underrepresented in graduate schools are encouraged to apply. Students should have declared a social science major and/or completed at least 12 credits in the social sciences. Deadline for application: February 13, 2009. For program details and application, visit  www.udel.edu/DRC/REU. Contact: Brittany Scott at (302) 831-6625; bscott@udel.edu.

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Classifieds

2009 ASA Community Action Research Initiative

Application Deadline is February 1

The ASA encourages applications for the 2009 Community Action Research Initiative (CARI). The purpose of this grant is to encourage sociologists to undertake community action projects that bring social science knowledge, methods, and expertise to bear in addressing community-identified issues and concerns. Grant applications are encouraged from sociologists seeking to work with community organizations, local public interest groups, or community action projects. Funding will run for the duration of the project, whatever the time span might be.

Applications are encouraged from sociologists in academic settings, research institutions, private and non-profit organizations, and government. Advanced graduate students are eligible to apply, but funding cannot be used to support dissertation research. While ASA membership is not a criterion for applying or being selected for this grant, if and when a grant award is made, the recipient must be a current ASA member. ASA membership involves acceptance of and adherence to the ASA Code of Ethics, which is critical to the implementation of the grant project. Grantees must also provide documentation of pertinent IRB approval for the funded project.

For additional information and complete application materials, visit www.asanet.org and click on "Funding". Direct questions or comments to spivack@asanet.org or 202-383-9005.

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