American Sociological Association

Section on Sociology of Population

News 2015 [ARCHIVED]


2015 12 – First Trans-Atlantic IMISCOE PhD Summer School

IMISCOE and Princeton University are proud to announce the first transatlantic IMISCOE PhD Summer school. The PhD Summer school will take place between 7th -13th of August 2016 in Princeton on campus. The application procedure for PhD students from Europe is now closed. The deadline for applicants from the US was extended until the 9th of December 2015. Further information and application procedures are available at:  https://www.imiscoe.org/news/network-news/483-call-for-applications-imiscoe-phd-summer-school-2016-princeton-university.

 

2015 12 – International Sociological Association, RC28 (Social Stratification and Mobility) conference

Theme: Intergenerational Transfer, Human Capital, and Inequality

Dates: May 26-28, 2016

Location: Singapore

Deadline for submission of the abstract: Dec. 10, 2015

 


 

2015 11 – Call for Papers: The Environmental Dimensions of Fertility Decision-Making

Special Issue of Population and Environment

Deadline:  May 30, 2016

For this special issue, we seek a range of empirical papers that examine the reciprocal elements of this association including the potential influences of environmental context on fertility decision-making and the implications of fertility decision-making for local environmental context. We are primarily interested in research examining these processes at the household- or local scales.  Papers should be theoretically sophisticated and methodologically rigorous and may include considerations of gender, social inequalities, environmental security, food security, among other social and environmental processes.

More generally, the research should improve broader understanding and theory regarding the association between population and environment.  We encourage contributions based on quantitative as well as qualitative data, as well as those that focus on policy dimensions.

Population and Environment publishes research articles (both full-length and research briefs), commentary and reviews related to the reciprocal links between population, natural resources, and the

Submission Deadline:  May 30, 2016.  Please submit questions prior to this deadline to Lori Hunter, Editor-in-Chief (Lori.Hunter@colorado.edu).  Submitted manuscripts should be formatted in accordance with Population and Environment guidelines available in the journal or at www.springer.com.

 

2015 11 – ASA 2016 Annual Meeting Call For Papers (Deadline is January 6, 2016, 3:00pm EST.)

http://www.asanet.org/AM2016/callforpapers.cfm

 The ASA Population Section has the following section-sponsored sessions:

1. Demography and Inequality. Session Organizer: Chenoa Flippen, University of Pennsylvania

2. Immigration, Nativity, and Family Dynamics. Session Organizer: Nancy S. Landale, Pennsylvania State University

3. Social Movements, Conflict, and Population Dynamics. Session Organizer: Nathalie Williams, University of Washington

4. Section on Sociology of Population Refereed Roundtables (one-hour). Session Organizer: Anna Zajacova, University of Wyoming

 

2015 11 – ASA 2016 Annual Meeting Population-Related Session Information

The ASA section on the Sociology of Development announces the following population-related session at next summer’s ASA meeting in Seattle. Population Section members are encouraged to submit abstracts for consideration.

Population and Development: Beyond Malthus; Beyond Modernization.

This session examines the interrelationships between population dynamics and national, regional and/or local development. Population change is conceptualized in an inclusive manner, as is development. The goal is to advance social demographic theory and research beyond conventional neo-Malthusian and modernization approaches.

Session Organizer: David L. Brown, Cornell University, dlb17@cornell.edu

 

 

2015 11 - Call for Nominations – Population Section

The Population Section Nominating Committee (Kyle Crowder, Irma Elo, Margot Jackson) is preparing a slate of candidates for next year's section elections.  The following positions are available: Chair-elect, 2 Council members, and a Student Representative on the Council.  Please send nominations, including self-nominations, to Margot Jackson (margotj@brown.edu), the Chair of the Nominating Committee, by November 23, 2015.

 

2015 11 - A New Tool for Using Demographic & Health Survey Data

Check out the new free IPUMS Demographic and Health Surveys at www.idhsdata.org. IPUMS-DHS is a consistently coded and fully documented version of Demographic and Health Survey data It allows users to see at a glance the variables available in each survey, to explore variable-specific documentation highlighting comparability issues (such as different universes or question wording), and to create a customized dataset with only the samples and variables relevant to a research project, in the format (SAS, SPSS, Stata, CSV, or ASCII) chosen by the user.  It facilitates analysis across time and countries, much like IPUMS and other MPC integrated-microdata projects. It includes over 2,000 variables pertaining to women of childbearing age and their children under age 5. The database incorporates 76 samples from the following countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The variables cover a broad range of topics relating to women's and children's health, with recent material added on household decision-making, attitudes toward intimate partner violence, beliefs about child health treatment, access to healthcare, child nutrition, diarrheal and respiratory illnesses and their treatment, and vaccinations. IPUMS-DHS is made possible with funding from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development. It is updated with new surveys, variables, and units of analysis once a year.

 

2015 11 - ASA 2016 Annual Meeting Call For Papers

(Deadline is January 6, 2016, 3:00pm EST)

http://www.asanet.org/AM2016/callforpapers.cfm

 

2015 11 - Call for Papers on the Health of Women and Men

for a Special Issue of Biodemography and Social Biology

Because it is clear that sex differences in health depend on social, behavioral and environmental context as well as biology, and because societies, behaviors, and environment are changing rapidly around the world, we invite the submission of papers that further our understanding of how and why women and men differ in health outcomes.

The desire to focus a journal issue on the Health of Women and Men is timely for a number of reasons.  Recent trends in the health status of American women indicate recent trends are worse than those of peers in other countries, and worse than those for men in the United States. For example, since 1980, U.S. women have lost 1-6 years of life expectancy relative to women in comparably wealthy nations, and 2-3 years of life expectancy relative to American males.  In addition, we have rapidly increasing data resources to study health differentials between women and men and their causes, including change over time and with age.  Comparative analyses of sex differences in international settings as well as studies from individual countries using relatively newly available rich data may lead to better understanding of the biological versus social or environmental factors causing men and women to differ in health. Changes in female/male differentials with age, time or cohort could also lead to increased insight.

Our expectation is that papers will be based on empirical analysis.  Papers should also help clarify our understanding of differences between women and men which generally requires a comparative analysis. Papers from multiple disciplines and methodological approaches are welcome.

Eileen Crimmins

Editor, Biodemography and Social Biology

Submit papers for the Special Issue on the Health of Men and Women by June 1, 2016

Biodemography and Social Biology accepts manuscript submissions electronically via the journal's ScholarOne Manuscripts site located at:

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bdsb

 


2015 10 - Demographers’ Research Cited in Supreme Court Amicus Brief!

Douglas Massey's and Sarah Cowan's research are cited in this Supreme Court amicus brief about population size and voting reapportionment (http://www.scotusblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Evenwel-DNCbrief092515.pdf). The case has population studies at its core and depending on how the court decides, it could transform US politics. You can read more about it in this NY Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/27/us/supreme-court-to-weigh-meaning-of-one-person-one-vote.html?_r=0.

 

2015 10 - Call for Abstracts – 2016 Annual Meeting of the International Sociological Association RC28 (Stratification and Mobility)

The ISA RC28 invites researchers to contribute to its 2016 spring conference to be held in Singapore, May 26-28, 2016. Abstract deadline is Dec 10. RC28's general objectives are to promote high quality research on social stratification and social mobility and the international exchange of scientific information in this field.  The theme of this conference is: "INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSFER, HUMAN CAPITAL, AND INEQUALITY". For more information and to submit an abstract, please visit: http://www.singaporerc28.com/call-for-proposal.html

 

2015 10 - Call for Fellows – Demographic and Health Surveys Program

2016 DHS FELLOWS PROGRAM FOR UNIVERSITY FACULTY FROM GHANA, KENYA, LESOTHO, MALAWI, NAMIBIA, NIGERIA, AND ZAMBIA -

ICF International is now accepting applications for the 2016 round of The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Fellows Program. The DHS Fellows Program, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is designed to increase the capacity of countries to conduct further analysis of DHS data. The primary objectives of the program are:

To teach Fellows to analyze and conduct research with DHS data;

To strengthen skills that Fellows will use to integrate DHS data into their teaching;

To increase the ability of Fellows to build the capacity of others to use DHS data at their home universities

ELIGIBILITY AND REQUIREMENTS

Applications for 2016 are only being accepted from faculty members at universities in Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, and Zambia. All team members must be based full-time at the home university. Applications must be from teams comprised of three faculty members from the same university who teach in departments of demography, public health, economics, sociology, geography, or other social sciences. Individuals who have already participated in a DHS data analysis workshop conducted by ICF International are not eligible. However, individuals who have only participated in a Service Provision Assessment (SPA) or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshop facilitated by ICF International are still eligible to apply.

Teams must include one senior faculty member. All three team members must be available to attend two workshops organized by ICF International (see anticipated timeline below). Each fellow must bring a laptop loaded with Stata and/or SPSS for the duration of each workshop. The language for the program is English. Each team will be expected to jointly complete a publishable-quality manuscript in English on policy-relevant questions that are primarily related to one or more of the following topic areas: HIV/AIDS, sexual behavior, family planning, fertility, reproductive health, maternal and child health, or gender issues. Papers must primarily use data from DHS, SPA, or AIDS Indicator Surveys. Completed manuscripts that meet the required standards will be published by ICF International in their Working Paper series [2]. Fellows will be encouraged to submit their completed papers to peer-reviewed journals for publication.

In addition, each team will be expected to design a plan for building capacity in the use of DHS data for teaching and research to be implemented at their home universities. Teams are required to report back on the implementation of capacity-building activities prior to completion of the program. See more at: http://dhsprogram.com/Who-We-Are/News-Room/2016-DHS-Fellows-Program-accepting-applications-until-December-1-2015.cfm

 

2015 10 - Participate in the Healthy People 2020 Process

Healthy People 2020 is seeking participation in its public comment period, open from Oct. 15-Nov. 13. The public comment period allows participants to comment on proposed new objectives to be added to the topic areas of family planning; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender health; preparedness; and social determinants of health. Participants may also propose new objectives to be included in the 42 existing Healthy People 2020 topic areas. To take part in the public comment period, visit HealthyPeople.gov beginning Oct. 15. Comments will be accepted through 5 p.m. EST on Nov. 13.

When submitting your manuscript, please Indicate that the paper is for the Special Issue on the Health of Women and Men.

Research manuscripts should not exceed 4,500 words in length and 5 tables and figures (excluding references, tables, and figures; however Appendices are included in the length). Brief reports, not exceeding 2,500 words, are also acceptable.

View the full Instructions for Authors here.

http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=hsbi20&page=instructions&#.VgVLAstViko

 


2015 09 – American Community Survey 2014 Planned Release

The 2014 ACS 1-year estimates are planned for release on Thursday, September 17, 2015.

The American Community Survey (ACS) produces statistics on numerous social, economic and housing characteristics, including language, education, the commute to work, employment, mortgage status and rent, as well as income, poverty and health insurance. The 2014 ACS 1-year estimates will be available for the nation, all states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Embargo subscribers will have access to these statistics beginning noon EST Wednesday, September 16 for release at 12:01a.m. Thursday, September 17. Please note that this is a 12-hour embargo.

The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates are planned for release on Thursday, December 10, 2015. The 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates will be available for all geographic areas including census tracts, ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs), and block groups. For the first time, users will be able to compare two non-overlapping 5-year datasets (2005-2009 and 2010-2014). Embargo subscribers will have access to these statistics beginning Tuesday, December 8. Please note that the ACS 3-year estimates have been discontinued. Every community in the nation will continue to receive a detailed statistical portrait of its social, economic, housing and demographic characteristics through 1-year and 5-year ACS products. Please call the U.S. Census Bureau's Customer Services Center on 1 (800) 923-8282 with any questions. 

 

2015 09 – Call for Proposals – Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality New Scholars Grant Competition

The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI), a National Poverty Research Center funded by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, seeks to support research that will expand our knowledge of key trends in poverty and inequality. The CPI anticipates funding up to 3 proposals with a maximum award of $20,000 each. The awards will be made to “New Scholars” (i.e., scholars who have received their Ph.D. no earlier than 2008) who will then work collaboratively with one of the CPI’s Research Groups to carry out the proposed research project. See this PDF for more information about the program and for details about how to apply.

 

2015 09 – Call for Papers – Special Issue on Methodological Innovations in Gerontology: Advances in Psychosocial Research

Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences invites papers for an upcoming joint special issue  on methodological innovations in psychosocial research on aging. Authors are encouraged to apply innovative methods and data resources to both emerging or core questions in social gerontology. Authors also are encouraged to conclude with a brief assessment of the value of the innovative method or data source used; that is, how might innovative methods advance our substantive knowledge above and beyond what we would learn using “traditional” methods? Further details on the mission of the special issue and submission procedures can be found at the following link: http://www.oxfordjournals.org//our_journals/geronb/series%20b_methodological%20innovations%20in%20gerontology%20advances%20in%20psychosocial%20research%20(3).pdf

 

2015 09 – Penn State 23rd Annual National Symposium on Family Issues – Boys and Men in African American Families

The place and potential of Black boys and men in the U.S. was the focus of an initiative launched in the early 1990s by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation’s National Task Force on African American Men and Boys.  The Task Force focused its attention on “African-American men and boys who are not a part of either the recognized economic structure, or the body politic, of the country. Nor are they in community with their own ethnic group . . .”   The Task Force’s influential report, Repairing the breach: Key Ways to Support Family Life, Reclaim Our Streets and Rebuild Civil Society in America’s Communities, (Austin, 1996) noted that the health and development of Black boys and men has emerged within a larger system of forces ranging from macro-level political and economic structures and influences, to those at the community and family levels, and to the individual activities and behaviors of Black males themselves. The report also recognized that violence and disaffection toward and by Black men and boys are symptoms of this larger, multi-layered system of influences. Almost two decades after publication of Repairing the Breach, the 2015 Annual Symposium on Family Issues is aimed at contributing to the continuing dialogue on promoting the potential of Black boys and men-- with a focus on the role of family.  In developing this year’s Symposium, the Penn State team is joined by experts from Duke University and from the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School.  After opening remarks that set the stage for understanding Black male achievement in contemporary U.S. society, sessions will focus on Black males at different points across the life course, including boyhood, adolescence and young adulthood, and adulthood, with speakers and discussants providing perspectives on policy and practice and from academic disciplines ranging from sociology and demography, to public health, and clinical, social, and developmental psychology.  Within each session, presentations will delineate some of the challenges facing Black males in the U.S. and highlight family resources and supports that can foster resilience in the face of challenge. Throughout, we consider how larger social structural forces, as well as the individual behaviors and activities of boys and men, can challenge - or enhance – the impacts of family resilience processes.  Closing remarks will direct attention to the implications of family research for policy and practice. The Symposium’s larger goals are to showcase the current evidence base on family influences and family experiences of Black males within the larger context of U.S. social, economic and political structures and forces, and to provide a roadmap for interdisciplinary and translational research that advances knowledge, policy and practice—pertaining to a group that has been relatively neglected by family scholars. For more information and to register, please visit the link: http://www.pop.psu.edu/event/672/23rd-annual-national-symposium-family-issues-%E2%80%93-boys-and-men-african-american-families

 

2015 09 – Help Us Get another ASA Annual Meeting Session!

As of 9/15/2015, the Population Section of ASA has reached a new high with 538 members!  Thanks to all who have joined us! If we add 62 members by October 1 we’ll get another session at the 2016 meeting, increasing our opportunities to present and hear about population-related research in Seattle next year.

You can help us reach that goal and, more importantly, help your students enjoy the professional benefits of membership in the Population Section by sponsoring your students’ membership in the section.  If you have a student that is already an ASA member, you can give the gift of membership in our section for only $6.  For the price of a good coffee, your student will gain access to our annual reception, Mentors’ Lunch, and other valuable professional opportunities, and will be tied into a strong network of sociologists involved in cutting-edge population research.  For only $12 you can sponsor membership for a colleague.

Visit http://asa.enoah.com/Home/My-ASA/Gift-Section and select “Population, Sociology of” from the list of sections, then click on “To search for or add a new individual, please click here.” Search for, and select, the person you’d like to add to the section and then click “Proceed to Check Out.” Your recipient will be automatically notified of the gift via email.

 

2015 09 – Call for Book Chapter Proposals – The Costs of School Closure: Contexts and Consequences

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

WORKING TITLE: The Costs of School Closure: Context and Consequences

EDITOR: Ebony M. Duncan, Sociologist of Education at Washington University in St. Louis

Abstract Deadline: December 1, 2015

Chapter Deadline:  June 1, 2016

Schools are key social organizations that allocate status and facilitate opportunities for upward social mobility. They are also sites where competing and contradictory public policies perpetuate deleterious educational and social outcomes—especially for underserved groups. In recent years, municipal governments across the United States have closed increasing numbers of public schools—particularly in high poverty, predominately African American neighborhoods. Recent reports on school closings in major cities like Chicago and Philadelphia suggest that the rise in school closings in the last two decades is associated with increasing charter school enrollment, municipal budget deficits, and a host of other political and contextual factors. The causes and consequences of school closings are certainly relevant to immediate neighborhoods, but they are also emblematic of inequities in educational access on a global scale.

The book series, Research on African American Education, is accepting manuscripts for an upcoming title, The Costs of School Closure: Context and Consequences. The editor of The Costs of School Closure seeks original, robust manuscripts on the contexts and consequences of recent primary and secondary school closures in the United States and elsewhere. The purpose of this interdisciplinary volume is to identify how recent school closures are associated with shifts in social, economic, legal, and political contexts, as well as the implications of closures for students, their families, their teachers, and their communities. Key points to consider include: school district characteristics; historical contexts of school closures; changes in education policy; reasons for closure; how social, political, and economic contexts influence closure; and implications of school closures for students, teachers, and neighborhoods (etc.).

SUBMISSIONS

Authors are invited to submit abstracts (up to 250 words) by December 1, 2015. Formal invitations for submission will be extended by February 1, 2016. Accepted manuscripts are due June 1, 2016.

Please submit abstracts to: duncane@wustl.edu  with “School Closure Abstract” in the subject line.

Please direct any inquiries to:  Dr. Ebony M. Duncan at duncane@wustl.edu.

 


 

2015 08 – Call for Proposals – FOA for Small Grants on Research and Methods in Health Statistics from NCHS/CDC

This initiative invites investigator-initiated research grant applications for projects involving the development and testing of statistical and survey methodology relevant to the conduct, analysis and reporting of health surveys and vital records. Existing NCHS data sets alone or in conjunction with other data sets may be used to develop and test new survey methodology, statistical analytical approaches or methods of displaying data. Individual stand-alone projects relevant to the collection, analysis, or display of data are acceptable under this announcement. The R03 mechanism is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. It can be used to support different types of projects including: secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; pilot and feasibility studies; development and testing of statistical and survey methodology; and the development and testing of new survey technology. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=278051. Questions? Contact Virginia Cain at vcain@cdc.gov   

 

2015 08 – New Research Brief from Asia Research Institute Changing Family in Asia Research Cluster

Economic Stress in Asia and Policy Implications

 

2015 08 – Special Issue of the Research in Political Sociology devoted to Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World

Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World. Volume 23, Research in Political Sociology, October 2015. The volume edited by Eunice Rodriquez and Barbara Wejnert, consist of 17 papers first presented at the 1st Annual Conference on Women’s Studies in March 2015, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The volume stemmed from the persistent need to address the key question of whether, after prolonged discussions undertaken for almost half of the century by major world-scale institutions and numerous governments and scholars, gender equality is found in todays’ countries, communities, and families across the world. The volume looks at a broad range of gender equality issues from women’s health and status in families, opportunities at work, girls’ education, health and status of widows in developing countries, girls’ health, to political participation, community involvement and global migration. As the volume concludes, to challenge gender discrimination and to secure world’s prosperity and peace, we urgently need pro-girls and pro-women policies in the contemporary, globally developing world. The issues are address by leading scholars representing various discipline from economics, political science, sociology, health science and family studies; and representing vast domain of countries in Europe, America, Middle East, Australia, Asia and Africa. Ground-breaking material, innovative topics of studies, broad range of methodological approaches, and important policy findings enhances volume’s significance. More information on the volume can be found at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/series/rps.  

 

 

2015 08 – ASA Population Section Day Events with Room Information

See Attached Document

 

2015 08 – Special Issue of the Research in Political Sociology devoted to Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World

Enabling Gender Equality: Future Generations of the Global World. Volume 23, Research in Political Sociology, October 2015. The volume edited by Eunice Rodriquez and Barbara Wejnert, consist of 17 papers first presented at the 1st Annual Conference on Women’s Studies in March 2015, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The volume stemmed from the persistent need to address the key question of whether, after prolonged discussions undertaken for almost half of the century by major world-scale institutions and numerous governments and scholars, gender equality is found in todays’ countries, communities, and families across the world. The volume looks at a broad range of gender equality issues from women’s health and status in families, opportunities at work, girls’ education, health and status of widows in developing countries, girls’ health, to political participation, community involvement and global migration. As the volume concludes, to challenge gender discrimination and to secure world’s prosperity and peace, we urgently need pro-girls and pro-women policies in the contemporary, globally developing world. The issues are address by leading scholars representing various discipline from economics, political science, sociology, health science and family studies; and representing vast domain of countries in Europe, America, Middle East, Australia, Asia and Africa. Ground-breaking material, innovative topics of studies, broad range of methodological approaches, and important policy findings enhances volume’s significance. More information on the volume can be found at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/series/rps.

 

2015 08 – Call for Proposals – FOA for Small Grants on Research and Methods in Health Statistics from NCHS/CDC

This initiative invites investigator-initiated research grant applications for projects involving the development and testing of statistical and survey methodology relevant to the conduct, analysis and reporting of health surveys and vital records. Existing NCHS data sets alone or in conjunction with other data sets may be used to develop and test new survey methodology, statistical analytical approaches or methods of displaying data. Individual stand-alone projects relevant to the collection, analysis, or display of data are acceptable under this announcement. The R03 mechanism is intended to support small research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time with limited resources. It can be used to support different types of projects including: secondary analysis of existing data; small, self-contained research projects; pilot and feasibility studies; development and testing of statistical and survey methodology; and the development and testing of new survey technology. http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=278051. Questions? Contact Virginia Cain at vcain@cdc.gov

 

2015 08 – New Research Brief from Asia Research Institute Changing Family in Asia Research Cluster

 

Economic Stress in Asia and Policy Implications

 

2015 07 – New on the NICHD website: Exploring Population Dynamics

 NICHD’s Population Dynamics Branch supports research on a range of topics, including the factors that make populations rise and fall, such as fertility and mortality. Here’s what branch chief Rebecca Clark had to say http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/resources/spotlight/Pages/072115-pop-dynamics.aspx

 

2015 07 – Webinar – Demography, the Health Care Workforce, and the Impact of Innovation

As more and more baby boomers close in on retirement, the country’s aging population poses new and difficult policy choices. No industry sector is more affected by this demographic shift than the health care field, where increased demand for services could result in shortages of skilled workers. Technology may offer ways to close the gap in skilled labor by boosting productivity. For this webinar, we will examine the demographic trends of the graying of America and its economic implications. We will also look at how these changes affect consumption of goods and services, as well as demand for particular occupations. We will also show how to simulate changes in the demand for labor based on productivity increases due to technological innovations. This presentation will be approximately one hour in length, and we offer it at no charge via the Citrix GotoWebinar web conferencing platform. Advanced registration is required

Register here: http://www.remi.com/events/demography-the-health-care-workforce-and-the-impact-of-innovation

 

2015 07 – Call for Proposals – NCFR Innovations Grants

NCFR will support up to two $10,000 innovation grants over the next year. The grants program is designed to enhance interdisciplinary collaborations around issues of importance to family well-being. To that end, applicants must make a strong case that their proposed activities foster interdisciplinary collaborations, preferably among NCFR members, and support the Global Ends of NCFR. Proposals should explicitly describe how the project promotes collaborations across disciplines including but not limited to: family science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, child development, religious studies, economics, political science, and health. We encourage projects that aim to bridge the areas of research and practice and that build on a strong theoretical framework or advance theory. The call for proposals is intentionally broad to encourage a variety of innovative proposals that meet these objectives. Note, however, that funding will not be granted for supporting conferences or workshops. Proposals must be emailed to Jeanne Strand by 11:59 p.m. CT on Sept. 1, 2015. https://www.ncfr.org/awards/ncfr-innovation-grants

 

2015 07 – Special Issue of the Annals Devoted to Residential Inequality in American Neighborhoods and Communities

Residential Inequality in American Neighborhoods and Communities. Volume 660, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, July 2015. This volume, edited by Barrett Lee, Glenn Firebaugh, John Iceland, and Stephen Matthews, consists of 17 papers first presented at the Penn State Stratification Conference last fall. Motivating the volume is the dogged persistence of residential inequality in the United States. Although many people pursue the American Dream, seeking desirable homes and neighborhoods, their progress has been slowed by rising income disparities, natural disasters, the Great Recession, mortgage foreclosures, and dramatic swings in housing prices. Whether immigrants and their children are able to achieve their residential goals is another current concern. At the same time, longstanding spatial divides along race and class lines have been sustained through discriminatory practices and individuals’ preferences to live near those similar to themselves.

The contributors to the volume, who include leading scholars from multiple disciplines, explore how stratification intersects with the residential landscape. Their research highlights linkages between socioeconomic and ethnoracial statuses and four spatial sorting processes: segregation, housing and locational attainment, residential mobility, and neighborhood change. State-of-the-art substantive work is featured, with many of the papers employing innovative methods or data to speak to issues of both theoretical and policy importance. More information about the volume can be found at http://ann.sagepub.com/.

 

2015 07 – Preview of New ACS Website

A preview version of the U.S. Census Bureau's newly designed website for the American Community Survey (ACS) is now available. The website has a look and feel and contains terminology consistent withcensus.gov, allowing users to quickly find information thanks to an easy to understand hierarchical structure. We hope that you will enjoy browsing our new site and find more options and information each time.

While you get used to our new website, please use the links below to find the new versions of some of our most popular pages.

ACS Homepage

About the Survey

Respond to the Survey

Data Releases

Data

Guidance for Data Users

Geography & ACS

Technical Documentation

(Once you locate your favorite page, press CTRL+D to create a new bookmark. Please plan to update your bookmarks soon, as the current live site will be unavailable after June 23.)

 

2015 07 –Special Issue of the Annals Devoted to Residential Inequality in American Neighborhoods and Communities

This special issue is edited by Barrett Lee, Glenn Firebaugh, John Iceland, and Stephen Matthews and features papers written by several Pop section members. http://ann.sagepub.com/content/current

 

2015 07 – Call for Applications – Work and Family Researchers Network 2016 Early Career Work and Family Fellowship

The Work and Family Researchers Network (WFRN) is seeking applicants for 20

16 Early Career Work and Family Fellowships. The goal of the program is to help promising young scholars establish career successes, as well as connect them to the WFRN community. Fifteen scholars will be selected for the program. Fellows receive a one-year membership in the WFRN, conference registration, and $500 to help defer expenses to attend the 2016 WFRN Conference (to be held June 23-25, 2016 in Washington, D.C.). At the conference, special events will be targeted to serve the interests of fellows, including networking opportunities with senior scholars and teaching/research workshops. In addition, fellows will be connected with one another in periodic encounters beyond the conference, intended to facilitate collaboration and peer-mentorship. To be eligible, candidates must have received their doctorate in 2013 or later and have yet to progress into tenured or secure senior-level positions. Eligibility is not restricted on the basis of national location. Information about the program and application materials can be found here. The deadline for receipt of applications is September 15, 2015. Questions about the program can be addressed to Stephen Sweet, the program director, at ssweet@ithaca.edu.

 


2015 06 – FREE WORKSHOP – Introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) workshop. Dr. Georgiana Bostean, Assistant Professor at Chapman University, will be leading a free two-day, hands-on introduction to GIS (using ArcMap) workshop at the University of Melbourne, July 23-24, 2015.

TOPICS TO BE COVERED INCLUDE:

·         EXAMPLES OF GIS USES IN VARIOUS DISCIPLINES

·         BASICS OF GIS

·         GETTING STARTED IN ARCMAP

·         USING US CENSUS DATA IN GIS

For information, contact Dr. Leah Ruppanner of the University of Melbourne (leah.ruppanner@unimelb.edu.au).

 

2015 06 – Call for Proposals – Population Association of America Initiatives Committee

The Initiatives Committee (IC) of the Population Association of America (PAA) is soliciting proposals from PAA standing committees and members for activities that promote the strategic goals of the Association. Funding for this effort comes from PAA member contributions to the PAA Fund. The IC is charged with soliciting and evaluating proposals from PAA Committees and/or the PAA membership which are aimed at:

  • Increasing the PAA’s effective public profile
  • Increasing PAA diversity along multiple dimensions
  • Cultivating sustained engagement among PAA’s early career membership
  • Holding workshops or conferences at the annual meeting or at other times which would benefit a significant fraction of the membership
  • Supporting other types of activities which would be of value to the PAA in other ways

The IC will present to the Board at its fall meeting a ranking of the proposals it has received, using its own judgment on which proposals have the highest merit. Requests will be considered that continue ongoing activities not funded in the PAA operating budget or that propose new activities. Proposed activities must benefit the organization/membership broadly – not a select group of people, and activities should provide a benefit in the near term, rather than requiring sustained funding over the long term. The size of awards will vary depending on the needs and goals of the proposal. For member proposals, priority will be given to initiatives for which matching funds are available or are being sought by the applicant. As a general guideline, the range of awards will be $2,000 to $15,000. The PAA Board has allocated approximately $50,000 from the PAA Fund for this initiative for 2015 awards. For information on how to apply, please see the attached PDF announcement.

 

2015 06 – Call for Applications – Workshop and Training on Formal Demography

The Berkeley Population Center and the Center on Economics and Demography of Aging are pleased to announce a summer workshop and conference on formal demography, to take place August 16-21. The special emphasis topic will be economic demography.  It will feature 3 days of training in formal demographic methods for advanced graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, assistant professors and other early career researchers.  This portion will be followed by a two-day conference of presentations on applications of these methods to be presented by a panel of senior researchers from Cal as well as others invited from around the country.  Out of town trainees will be provided lodging and limited reimbursement for travel expenses.  For more information about the program, applying and formal demography, visit the program website,

http://popcenter.berkeley.edu/events/formaldemog.shtml. Applications that wish to be considered with travel funds are due June 1, 2015. We will accept applications through June 30, 2015. For any questions, please write to Dr. Leora Lawton, Executive Director, Berkeley Population Center, popcenter@demog.berkeley.edu

 

2015 06 – Call for Applications – Social Science Research Council Abe Fellowship

Now Accepting Applications - Deadline: Sept. 1, 5PM (EST)

Please note the new research agenda for 2015!

OVERVIEW

The Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP) announce the annual Abe Fellowship competition. The Abe Fellowship is designed to encourage international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The Abe Fellowship Program seeks to foster the development of a new generation of researchers who are interested in policy-relevant topics of long-range importance and who are willing to become key members of a bilateral and global research network built around such topics. Click here for information on our most recent Abe Fellows.

The goal of the Abe Fellowship Program is to encourage international multidisciplinary research on topics of pressing global concern. The program seeks to foster the development of a new generation of researchers who are interested in policy-relevant topics of long-range importance and who are willing to become key members of a bilateral and global research network built around such topics. It strives especially to promote a new level of intellectual cooperation between the Japanese and American academic and professional communities committed to and trained for advancing global understanding and problem solving. Here is a link if you’d like to learn more: http://www.ssrc.org/programs/abe-fellowship-program/

RESEARCH AGENDA

Applicants are invited to submit proposals for research in the social sciences and related fields relevant to any of the following four themes:

  • Threats to Personal, Societal, and International Security
  • Social, Scientific, and Cultural Trends and Transformations
  • Growth and Sustainable Development
  • Governance, Empowerment, and Participation

Research projects should be policy relevant, contemporary, and comparative or transnational.

FELLOWSHIP TERMS

Terms of the fellowship are flexible and are designed to meet the needs of Japanese and American researchers at different stages in their careers.

The program provides Abe Fellows with a minimum of 3 and maximum of 12 months of full-time support over a 24-month period.

Part-time residence abroad in the United States or Japan is required.

ELIGIBILITY

Applicants must:

  • be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or Japan. (Nationals of other countries MUST demonstrate a serious, long-term affiliation with research communities in the United States or Japan.)
  • hold a PhD or the terminal degree in their field, or equivalent professional experience at the time of application.

Applications from researchers in professions other than academia are encouraged.

CONTACT

For further information and to apply, go to:

http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/abe-fellowship/

Contact SSRC staff at abe@ssrc.org.

2015 06 – Congratulations to Jessica Ulrich-Schad, Purdue University

Jessica is the 2015 winner of the Rural Sociological Society Population Research Interest Group Graduate Student Paper Award for her paper: “Recreational Amenities, Rural Migration Patterns, and the Great Recession”. The competition was open to current graduate students and recent graduates who received their degrees no earlier than May 2014 and who submitted a paper in the areas of rural demography and population studies.  The winner of the award receives a cash prize to defray part of the cost of attending the 2015 RSS meeting. Congrats, Jessica!

2015 06 – Information about Population Section Day at ASA Annual Meeting

Join Us for the Population Day at ASA - Saturday, August 22, 2015

Section on Sociology of Population Roundtables - 8:30 to 9:30am

Table 01. Health and Education among Hispanics

Table 02. Predictors of Fertility in Low Fertility Contexts

Table 03. Making the Most of a Multidisciplinary Postdoctoral Experience

Table 04. How to Prepare Yourself for the Job Market

Table 05. Demographic and Socioeconomic Associations with Physical and Mental Health

Table 06. Life Course Events and Health in China

Table 07. Abortion, Pregnancy and Childbearing Preferences

Table 08. Health Outcomes in Less Developed Countries

Table 09. Family and Population Studies in Asia

Table 10. Strategies for Demographers at Colleges and Universities without a Population Research Center

Section on Sociology of Population Business Meeting - 9:30 to 10:10am

Section on Sociology of Population Paper Sessions

LGBT Health Disparities - 10:30am to 12:10pm

Spatial Stratification - 2:30 to 4:10pm

Race/Ethnicity and Population Dynamics - 4:30 to 6:10pm

Joint Reception: Section on the Sociology of the Family and Section on Sociology of Population - 6:30 to 8:30pm

Population Section Mentor/Mentee Lunch – 12:00pm

On August 22 at noon the section will host a mentor/mentee lunch at the Terzo Piano restaurant located on the third floor of the Modern Wing at the Art Institute of Chicago.  Terzo Piano is about a 10 minute walk from the conference hotels.  As the “semi-private” room in the restaurant can comfortably accommodate up to 30 people, we would like to host 15 mentees whose meals will be picked up by 15 mentors.  The lunch--possibly costing $67.00 per mentor--is a light lunch with refreshments.  Those interested in attending the event should contact Peter Brandon (pbrandon@albany.edu), Kathleen Cagney (kacagney@uchicago.edu), or James Raymo (jraymo@ssc.wisc.edu).  Mentors can pay Peter on the day.  The section is delighted to host this networking lunch. 

 Population Section Reception - 6:30pm-8:30pm

Population Section Reception held jointly with the Family Section

Saturday, August 22, 2015 6:30pm-8:30pm

Location:      The Gage: Theodore Ascher Room and Bar

24 South Michigan Avenue - located between Madison and       Monroe Streets.

http://www.opentable.com/rest_profile_privatedining.aspx?rid=10315

Thematic Session - Counting the LGBT Population in Federal Statistical Systems

 

The Pop Section chair also organized the following invited thematic session that will be on Sunday, August 23, 10:30am to 12:10pm

Thematic Session - Counting the LGBT Population in Federal Statistical Systems. For further detail, see http://www.asanet.org/AM2015/am_2015.cfm

 

2015 06 – Special Journal Issues of Interest

Yeung, W.J. and Cheung, A. (2015) Guest Editors. Living Alone: One Person Households in Asia, A special collection in Demographic Research, V.32. 2015.

Yeung, W. J. and Jones G. (2014) Guest Editors. Marriage in Asia, A special issue in Journal of Family Issues, 35(12).

 

2015 06 – ASA Population Section Election Results

Chair-Elect (1-year term begins in 2015):

John Iceland, Penn State University

Secretary/Treasurer (3-year term begins in 2015):

Philip Cohen, University of Maryland

Council Members (3-year term begins in 2015:

Margot Jackson, Brown University

Anna Zajacova, University of Wyoming

Student Member (2-year term begins in 2015)

Raeven Faye Chandler, Penn State University

 

2015 06 – Call for Applications – The Data Sharing for Demographic Research Project, Meeting

The Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR) project, funded by NICHD, is seeking interested PHD candidates and/or post-docs to attend the upcoming meeting in August in DC with NICHD to discuss data sharing. The purpose of the meeting is to bring together a group of researchers to discuss topics that continue to be of great interest in the demography and population science communities (e.g. genomic data, deductive disclosure risk, data harmonization, big data) and to reach consensus in terms of program activities that could be developed by the DSDR project which would make a relevant and positive contribution in these areas. Please see DSDR's website for more information about the project (www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/DSDR/) or contact Dr. Mary McEniry at mmceniry@umich.edu.  All travel expenses will be covered for attendees.

 

2015 06 – Call for Applications – Workshop and Training on Formal Demography

The Berkeley Population Center and the Center on Economics and Demography of Aging are pleased to announce a summer workshop and conference on formal demography, to take place August 16-21. The special emphasis topic will be economic demography.  It will feature 3 days of training in formal demographic methods for advanced graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, assistant professors and other early career researchers.  This portion will be followed by a two-day conference of presentations on applications of these methods to be presented by a panel of senior researchers from Cal as well as others invited from around the country.  Out of town trainees will be provided lodging and limited reimbursement for travel expenses.  For more information about the program, applying and formal demography, visit the program website,

http://popcenter.berkeley.edu/events/formaldemog.shtml. Applications that wish to be considered with travel funds are due June 1, 2015. We will accept applications through June 30, 2015. For any questions, please write to Dr. Leora Lawton, Executive Director, Berkeley Population Center, popcenter@demog.berkeley.edu

 

2015 06 – Call for Applications – Editor of Journal of Marriage and Family

The National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) is seeking nominations and applications for the position of editor of the Journal of Marriage and Family (JMF). The term of the current editor, R. Kelly Raley, University of Texas at Austin, will be completed with the publication of the December 2016 issue.

The four-year term of the new editor will begin with the publication of the February 2017 issue. Editorial responsibilities, however, will begin to transfer to the new editor beginning January 2016. The JMF search committee anticipates selecting the new editor at the annual NCFR conference in November 2015 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Nominees and applicants must be members of NCFR. The search committee will begin reviewing nominations and applications on September 1, 2015.

The search committee members include: Alan J. Hawkins, chair (Brigham Young University), Marilyn Coleman (University of Missouri), Frank Fincham, (Florida State University), Daphne Hernandez (University of Houston), David R. Johnson (Penn State University), and Kei Nomaguchi (Bowling Green State University).

For a detailed description of the editor’s responsibilities, please email Jeanne Strand at NCFR office at jeannestrand@ncfr.org.

Nominations and applications, including a letter of application and a curriculum vitae, should be emailed to Jeanne Strand at jeannestrand@ncfr.org or mailed to her at:

Search Committee for Editor of Journal of Marriage and Family

National Council on Family Relations

1201 West River Parkway, Suite 200

Minneapolis, MN, USA 55454

Phone 888-781-9331

Fax: 763-781-9348

 

2015 06 – Request for Pilot Proposals from the Network on Life Course Health Dynamics and Disparities

The Network on Life Course Health Dynamics and Disparities invites interested investigators to submit pilot proposals for research that address racial/ethnic disparities in US population health and mortality. Projects will begin in summer of 2015 and must be completed by June 30th, 2016. See attached announcement for more information. Deadline is June 12.

 

2015 06 – Call for Abstracts, Social Observatories Coordinating Network Conference on New Data Linkages

The Social Observatories Coordinating Network (https://socialobservatories.org) is planning to hold a conference in the Washington DC area in March 2016. The conference will highlight research programs that demonstrate novel linkages between at least two distinct data sources, types, or modalities and which answer an important social scientific question. Examples of novel data linkages include—but are by no means limited to—new combinations of survey and administrative data; psychometrics and air quality; community indicators and individual observational data; social analytics and voting data; and social media and economic indicators. Papers must relate empirical results from a study that addresses a specific research question (i.e. mere description of data resources is not sufficient). Themes are equally open. Of particular interest are social mobility; social change and adaptation; social inequality; and other key social and behavioral science topics. Paper drafts will be presented at a conference on March 24-25, 2016. Revised papers will be submitted for an edited volume of a journal. Selected participants will have conference expenses paid and will receive a modest honorarium upon the successful acceptance of their article. Interested researchers should submit a 3-5 page paper prospectus or abstract to Sandra Hofferth at hofferth@umd.edu by August 20, 2015. Submitters will be notified by October 15, 2015.

Click here for Flyer

2015 06 – Call for Papers, Alp-Pop 2016

Alp-Pop brings together scholars interested in population issues across several disciplines, including demography, economics, epidemiology, political science, sociology, and psychology. The conference emphasizes empirical rigor and innovation over a given topic or geographical area, and meets the challenges of interdisciplinary and international audiences. We welcome submissions on all population issues (e.g., population and health, migration, families and the welfare state, population and economic development/institutions, well-being, etc.). We particularly encourage submissions that take a life-course perspective and/or address social inequalities. Submissions of original papers or extended abstracts are invited by August 15, 2015, and submitters will be notified of acceptance within a couple of weeks. Submissions and inquiries should be addressed via e-mail to: alp.pop@unibocconi.it. The confirmed Ski-note speakers for the 2016 Conference are Daniel Hamermesh (Royal Holloway—University of London and University of Texas at Austin) and Elizabeth Thomson (SUDA, Stockholm University and University of Wisconsin–Madison). Alp-Pop scholars confer both formally and informally. A traditional conference program (paper and poster presentations) mixes with group activities in a world-class winter resort. The conference location, Hotel du Golf, is very close to the ski slopes of Villars and was chosen strategically for its proximity to both Geneva and Torino/Milano. If there is demand, we will also aim to organize childcare. Please indicate in your application if you intend to bring children along to the conference, as well as their ages.

Organizing committee: Arnstein Aassve (Bocconi University), Laura Bernardi (University of Laussanne), Michele Pellizzari (University of Geneva), and Domenico Tabasso (University of Geneva). Alp-Pop is organized by the Carlo F. Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy at Bocconi University and the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research LIVES: Overcoming vulnerability: Life course perspectives.

 

2015 06 – Penn State’s 23rd Annual Symposium on Family Issues, Oct 26-27, 2015

BOYS AND MEN IN AMERICAN FAMILIES: The 2015 Symposium is aimed at contributing to the continuing dialogue on promoting the potential of Black boys and men, with a focus on the role of family. The annual Symposium gathers distinguished researchers, young scholars and students, policy makers, and health and human service providers.

Featured Topics:

  • Challenges facing Black males in the U.S. across the lifecourse
  • The role of families in the wel

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