American Sociological Association

Section on Economic Sociology

PhDs on the Market

If you are a PhD Candidate, currently on the job market, specializing in economic sociology, and would like to showcase your work here, please email the economic sociology section webmaster, Dustin Stoltz: dstoltz[at]nd[dot]edu

Alicia D. Eads

ade25@cornell.edu

Department of Sociology

Cornell University

PhD Candidate

CV

www.aliciaeads.com

 

Dissertation description:

In the wake of the housing market collapse and related financial market crisis in the U.S., policymakers intervened aggressively in financial markets but only weakly in housing markets. Why did officials pursue this lopsided policy approach, which exacerbated wealth inequality in the U.S.? My dissertation uses this empirical puzzle to explore theoretical questions regarding how cultural meaning affects policymaking. I use computational text analysis and network analysis to compare the semantic structures of different government agencies’ discourses on crisis events and policies. This reveals different webs of meaning created by proponents of different policies. In a second part of the dissertation, I use event history analysis to analyze the foreclosure prevention policies passed by some U.S. states. I find that cultural meanings of crisis events affect whether states adopted policies independently of other factors such as economic conditions and political party control of state legislatures. In a final part of the dissertation, I examine how convergence or divergence of meaning affect the coordination of policy actions.

 

Lindsey Ibanez

ibanez.7@buckeyemail.osu.edu

Department of Sociology

The Ohio State University

PhD Candidate

CV

www.lindseyibanez.com 

 

Dissertation description:

My dissertation, which is funded by an NSF Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, examines how job-seekers mobilize their personal networks for low-wage work in a context of high poverty, underemployment, and informality. Drawing upon in-depth qualitative interviews with 106 low-wage workers and job-seekers in León, Nicaragua's second-largest city, the dissertation presents four key findings: 1) The low-wage labor market represents a reputation game, due to the instability of employment and the importance of referrals for obtaining work; 2) many network ties, especially vertical ones, go un-mobilized by job-seekers; 3) job-seekers and their network members construct an idealized image of a worthy worker; 4) trust is a necessary but not sufficient condition for obtaining job referrals. This study contributes to existing research on job search an analysis of a low-wage labor market, and it contributes to network studies an analysis of the tie mobilization process. This project reflects my interest in the multidimensionality of social relationships and the consequences of this multidimensionality in economic life.

 

Jacinto Cuvi

jacintocuvi@austin.utexas.edu

Department of Sociology

University of Texas at Austin

PhD Candidate

CV

www.jacintocuvi.com

 

Dissertation description: 

I study the effects of state participation in informal markets. Because informal actors routinely transgress legal norms, informal economies are often conceived as operating beyond the sphere of state regulation. However, informal actors interact with state authorities on a daily basis. Police officers or city officials can enforce norms if they choose to, and escaping or negotiating enforcement is a key part of conducting informal business. Through a case study of street vending in Brazil’s financial and industrial capital, São Paulo, I tease out the dynamics and consequences of state intervention both against peddlers (e.g., a mass-eviction campaign) and in their favor (e.g., a licensing program). I also analyze the impacts of the 2014 soccer World Cup, which created new opportunities but increased repression. More broadly, my dissertation shows that the state structures access to opportunities and resources for the urban poor even at the margins of the formal economy.