American Sociological Association

Section on Animals and Society

Bulletin

PLEASE RECRUIT!

If you know current members in other sections of ASA whose interests intersect with ours, please reach out to them and encourage them to join our section!

NEW MEMBERSHIPS AND RENEWALS: Section Membership Renewals 2016

Anyone who joins ASA before the end of the 2016 calendar year will only receive membership until the end of December as ASA memberships expire at the end of the 2016 calendar year. Therefore, as indicated above, if you have colleagues that are already members of ASA, it will greatly assist us with our numbers if they spend $10 to join our section ($5 for graduate students so graduate students, please encourage your classmates).  Then, all members will need to renew their memberships before the end of the 2016 calendar.  After that there is a couple-of-weeks grace period for you to remain on the listserv, though! When renewing your membership, please be certain to renew your membership in the Animals & Society section.

Our ASA session sections are based on our membership numbers. We are currently conducting a membership drive targeting graduate students.  The magic number is 200.  The more members we have the more paper sessions we are able to run at the ASA annual meetings

Here is the link to join and renew. https://asa.enoah.com/default.aspx

Please renew and encourage your colleagues to join!

SUSAN LUNN BECOMES NEWSLETTER EDITOR

Send your news to Susan Lunn for the next issue.

RECENT AWARD WINNERS AT THE 2016 MEETING 

Award for Distinguished Scholarship: David Grazian, University of Pennsylvania, book title  "American Zoo: A Sociological Safari" 

Jane Goodall Award for Distinguished Graduate Student Scholarship: Andrea Laurent-Simpson, Texas Women’s University, for her unpublished manuscript “Extending Identity Theory: Parenting and Identity Formation in the Context of Human-Animal Relationships”

Clifton Bryant Animals & Society Course Award: Keri Brandt of Fort Lewis College for her class “Animals & Society” 

 

PAST MEMBERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS: 

Amy Fitzgerald Wins Award:  Volume 1 of the Human-Animal Studies e-Newsletter published in January informed members of the Animals and Society Institute that Amy Fitzgerald was recently awarded the Meritorious Service Award for full time faculty at the University of Windsor for her accomplishments in teaching and research. This is pleasing news, so it is repeated here.

ARTICLE CONTRIBUTIONS BY SECTION MEMBERS

"Happy Meals"
Helene M. Lawson, CONTEXTS Volume 13, No. 3 (2014) 8.
Is a hamburger from a happy cow better than one from an unhappy cow? There are differing opinions based on flavor, healthiness, ecology and how well we forget the animal we ate.

RECENT ARTICLES BY SECTION MEMBER

Corey Lee Wrenn,
with R. Johnson, "A Critique of Single-Issue Campaigning and the Importance of Comprehensive Abolitionist Vegan Advocacy" Food, Culture & Society Volume 16, No. 4, 651-668 (2013).
" Nonhuman Animal Rights, Alternative Food Systems, and the Non-Profit Industrial Complex" Phaenex: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture Volume 8, No.2, 209-242 (2013).
"The role of professionalization regarding female exploitation in the Nonhuman Animal rights movement"
Journal of Gender Studies Online only (for profit) (2013) DOI:10.1080/09589236.2013.806248.
"The Abolitionist Approach: Critical Comparisions and Challenges within the Animal Rights Movement"
Interface, Volume 4, No. 2, 438-458 (2012).
Applying Social Movement Theory to Nonhuman Rights Mobilization and the Importance of Faction Hierarchies"
Peace Studies Journal Volume 5, No. 3, 27-44 (2012).
Resisting the Globalization of Speciesism: Vegan Abolitionism as a Site of Consumer-Based Social Change"
Journal for Critical Animal Studies Volume 9, No. 3, 9-27 (2012).

 RECENT ARTICLE BY SECTION MEMBER

"Defining Fish"
Helene M. Lawson
Sociological Viewpoints, Volume 27, No. 1 (2011)
This article examines the how people construct the meanings they give to pet and similar fish they keep in their personal spaces. It is an ethnographic tour of quotidian epistemology. Because fish are intimately common and yet regarded as being on a par with vegetables as far as animal rights are concerned, they are readily transformed by their owners' imaginations.

 RECENT ARTICLE BY SECTION MEMBER:

"Gender Work in a Feminized Profession: The Case of Veterinary Medicine"
Leslie Irvine and Jenny R. Vermilya
Gender & Society, Volume 24, No. 1 (2010)
Veterinary medicine has undergone dramatic, rapid feminization while in many ways remaining gendered masculine. With women constituting approximately half of its practitioners and nearly 80 percent of students, veterinary medicine is the most feminized of the comparable health professions. Nevertheless, the culture of veterinary medicine glorifies stereotypically masculine actions and attitudes. This article examines how women veterinarians understand the gender dynamics within the profession. The authors' analysis reveals that the discursive strategies available to women sustain and justify the status quo, and thus preserve hegemonic masculinity. Women use strategies previously used toward female tokens in non-traditional jobs, such as role encapsulation, and strategies previously used by male tokens in traditionally female jobs, such as distancing from the feminine. Through this discursive "gender work," women help to maintain the institutionalized inequality and the masculine ethic of the profession. Veterinary medicine illustrates the importance of considering organizational context in studies of feminization.

NEW ARTICLE BY A SECTION MEMBER:

Colin Jerolmack, "Humans, animals and play: Theorizing interaction when intersubjectivity is problematic", Sociological Theory (v.27, no.4, 2009).

NEW BOOK in SPANISH on HUMAN ANIMAL RELATIONS

Ana Cristina Ramírez Barreto, De humanos y otros animales, (Editorial Dríada, México).

NEW BOOK

James William (Bill) Gibson's new book on the cultural reenchantment of nature,
A REENCHANTED WORLD; THE QUEST FOR A NEW KINSHIP WITH NATURE, was recently published by Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt. Much of his work discusses important cultural changes concerning wild animals: symbolic, totemic kinship ties between people and animals  are becoming increasing common in film, television, nature writing, disciplines such as conservation biology, and even in newspaper obituaries. Gibson also explores the ways in which animals are now framed as consecrating landscapes(such as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge), the internal problems of reenchantment, and the religious and political attacks waged against it during the Bush era. For reviews and an excerpt see www.jameswilliamgibson.com

NEW TEACHING GUIDE

The journal, Sociology Compass has published a "Teaching and Learning Guide for Animals and Sociology" written by Leslie Irvine. The URL of this article is: www.blackwell- compass.com/subject/sociology/article_view? article_id=soco_tr_bpl204"

 

ARTICLES AND DRAFTS

Post your draft article or a link to your open-access article here, on this bulletin board. Ask for comments from readers if you wish. Have them e-mailed to you. Contact webmaster.

Articles and Drafts by Members